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Milk Use in Greenhouses to Prevent Plant Pathogens

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sheeplewolf

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Posted 23 November 2022 - 09:49 PM

Hi Guys! I am a student at Michigan State University, and I came across a very interesting article and wanted to know your opinion on it.

 

Can applying milk to tools or plants be effective in reducing virus transmission? - MSU Extension

 

What is the food safety opinion on this? It seems like to prevent plant pathogens this is very effective. But, is there not risk from 1) an allergen perspective and 2) a human pathogen perspective? I would think that milk is a good food source for potential pathogenic bacteria which could replicate in the solution (if you dip tools, or hands in it) and if it contacted the edible portion of the crop.

 

Thanks for everyone's thoughts!


Edited by Charles.C, 29 November 2022 - 10:35 PM.
original,non-functional, link replaced


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G M

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Posted 29 November 2022 - 10:37 PM

...

What is the food safety opinion on this? It seems like to prevent plant pathogens this is very effective. But, is there not risk from 1) an allergen perspective and 2) a human pathogen perspective? I would think that milk is a good food source for potential pathogenic bacteria which could replicate in the solution (if you dip tools, or hands in it) and if it contacted the edible portion of the crop.

 

Thanks for everyone's thoughts!

 

Yes, it is a cross contamination risk -- lots of human pathogens will happily grow in milk and the allergenic proteins will linger too.

 

I didn't follow through to the original research, but it looked like it was done with ornamentals, not food crops.



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kingstudruler1

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Posted 30 November 2022 - 10:23 PM

I guess i agree with GM.    

 

 

However, I can't seem to get past why any would do this?    Why use something that is marginally effective when there are proven solutions/virocides?


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G M

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Posted 30 November 2022 - 10:32 PM

...   Why use something that is marginally effective when there are proven solutions/virocides?

 

'All natural' or some kind of identity claim like that would be my guess.



sheeplewolf

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Posted 01 December 2022 - 12:54 AM

I believe that some virocides are not permitted (or just not an approved use) on gloved hands per EPA label. Hence, other options are considered.

 

I think depending on the plant pathogen, very few things work against some of the hardier viruses. What kinds of virocides have you guys seen be used in GH production? I've only seen what is used in fields, and typically it is 15-25 PPM hypochlorous acid, and they check with test strip and with pH strip.



kingstudruler1

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Posted 02 December 2022 - 06:28 PM

there are many sanitizers / disinfectants that are effective against viruses on hands, tools and surfaces.   there are some mentioned in the article.   

 

If you are talking about application to plants, your correct are choices are going to much more limited. 

 

https://ag.umass.edu...ting-greenhouse


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sheeplewolf

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Posted 03 December 2022 - 01:40 AM

The label also dictates frequently/how something can legally be used, for example, if it can be used as a tool dip, gloved hand dip, etc.

I am also curious if the products mentioned are effective against very resistant viruses.



Charles.C

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Posted Today, 06:30 AM

The label also dictates frequently/how something can legally be used, for example, if it can be used as a tool dip, gloved hand dip, etc.

I am also curious if the products mentioned are effective against very resistant viruses.

Hi sheeplewolf,

 

Is this a Student Project by any chance ?


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C




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