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Sample transportation using dry ice!?


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#1 Renatus

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Posted 08 November 2017 - 08:32 AM

Hi all,

 

I have a client who for some reason decided to use dry ice in a shipping container for shipping frozen poultry samples for microbiological analyses. Samples are shipped overnight by a courier company. Initially,  the client has been using ice bricks and gel pack but they think their recent positive results are due to their packaging conditions. This was the reason that they decided to introduce the use of dry ice but they did not consult us.

 

When the samples arrive at the lab they are still in frozen conditions. However, my concern is the packaging conditions might be damaging some cells, therefore, affecting the final microbial results.

 

Can I have your opinion on the use of dry ice for sample transportation for microbial testing!!?


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#2 Charles.C

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Posted 08 November 2017 - 10:24 AM

Hi all,

 

I have a client who for some reason decided to use dry ice in a shipping container for shipping frozen poultry samples for microbiological analyses. Samples are shipped overnight by a courier company. Initially,  the client has been using ice bricks and gel pack but they think their recent positive results are due to their packaging conditions. This was the reason that they decided to introduce the use of dry ice but they did not consult us.

 

When the samples arrive at the lab they are still in frozen conditions. However, my concern is the packaging conditions might be damaging some cells, therefore, affecting the final microbial results.

 

Can I have your opinion on the use of dry ice for sample transportation for microbial testing!!?

 

Hi Renatus,

 

Afaik and IMEX (seafood) dry ice has been used for several decades for shipping frozen goods for subsequent BCP evaluation.

I assume the samples are in a sealed packaging and do not come into direct contact with dry ice blocks.

 

I looked up approx. 10 random references from Google.

 

8/10 had no objections, eg these links -

 

https://www.ams.usda...logical-testing

http://www.inspectio...5/1353610619804

https://www.fda.gov/...s/ucm070875.htm

------------------------------------------------------------------

One accepted but with a caveat -

If sample must be shipped to the laboratory, follow procedures above and pack frozen sample in contact with dry ice to maintain temperature as low as possible during shipment. Pack sample in a container such as a paint can or Nalgene bottles which are impervious to CO gas, because absorption of CO2 by the sample could lower the pH and diminish the viability of C. perfringens. Store sample at -70 to -90°F on receipt and keep at this temperature until examined, preferably within a few days.

 

https://www.fda.gov/...s/ucm070878.htm

(Also see this vaguely related link -

http://www.rapidmicr...ped-on-dry-ice/

------------------------------------------------------------------

One accepted generally but not for micro. analysis. No explanation given, ie  -

 

Note:   Dry ice should not be used when shipping samples for microbiological analysis as the dry ice could alter the results.

 

(Canadian Food Inspection Agency) (Possibly the previous caveat was the reason).


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#3 Leila Burin

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Posted 15 November 2017 - 01:13 PM

Hello, indeed it affects the Campy result. Check the COMMISSION REGULATION (EU) 2017/1495

of 23 August 2017

amending Regulation (EC) No 2073/2005 as regards Campylobacter in broiler carcases

 

"When testing against the process hygiene criteria set out in Row 2.1.5 and Row 2.1.9 of Chapter 2 for Salmonella and Campylobacter in poultry carcases in slaughterhouses and the tests for Salmonella and Campylobacter are carried out in the same laboratory, neck skins from a minimum of 15 poultry carcases shall be sampled at random after chilling during each sampling session. Before examination, the neck skin samples from at least three poultry carcases from the same flock of origin shall be pooled into one sample of 26 g. Thus, the neck skin samples form 5 × 26 g final samples (26 g are needed to perform analyses for Salmonella and Campylobacter from one sample in parallel). The samples shall be kept after sampling and transported to the laboratory at a temperature not lower than 1 °C and not higher than 8 °C and the time between the sampling and the testing for Campylobacter shall be of less than 48 hours in order to ensure maintenance of sample integrity. Samples that have reached a temperature of 0 °C shall not be used to verify compliance with the Campylobacter criterion. "

 

best regards,

Leila


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#4 Charles.C

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Posted 16 November 2017 - 03:44 AM

Hello, indeed it affects the Campy result. Check the COMMISSION REGULATION (EU) 2017/1495

of 23 August 2017

amending Regulation (EC) No 2073/2005 as regards Campylobacter in broiler carcases

 

"When testing against the process hygiene criteria set out in Row 2.1.5 and Row 2.1.9 of Chapter 2 for Salmonella and Campylobacter in poultry carcases in slaughterhouses and the tests for Salmonella and Campylobacter are carried out in the same laboratory, neck skins from a minimum of 15 poultry carcases shall be sampled at random after chilling during each sampling session. Before examination, the neck skin samples from at least three poultry carcases from the same flock of origin shall be pooled into one sample of 26 g. Thus, the neck skin samples form 5 × 26 g final samples (26 g are needed to perform analyses for Salmonella and Campylobacter from one sample in parallel). The samples shall be kept after sampling and transported to the laboratory at a temperature not lower than 1 °C and not higher than 8 °C and the time between the sampling and the testing for Campylobacter shall be of less than 48 hours in order to ensure maintenance of sample integrity. Samples that have reached a temperature of 0 °C shall not be used to verify compliance with the Campylobacter criterion. "

 

best regards,

Leila

 

Hi Leila,

 

Thks for above.

 

I note that the overall Regulation implementation date is from 1st January 2018.

 

I deduce this directive is targeted at (local) sampling/evaluating farms and slaughterhouses. Nature of the OP's product samples is unknown but the relevance of the EU directive's comments could potentially include samples other than skin.

 

Reason for "changes" to existing Camp. procedures is apparently due an observed significant reduction in Camp. on freezing, eg these 2014 articles -

 

http://www.huffingto..._n_6183520.html

http://thehygienedoc...chicken-answer/

 

 

I note as you mention this is specific to Campylobacter only. And to carcass skin samples. Positive detection level of broiler carcases apparently averaged 76% in EU in 2008. Whether, in this context, the existing transport requirements for Camp. (and others?) are already as per new  directive is unmentioned.

 

I also note the 48 hrs criterion. Not so simple if international features involved.


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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#5 Renatus

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Posted 16 November 2017 - 07:10 AM

Hello, indeed it affects the Campy result. Check the COMMISSION REGULATION (EU) 2017/1495

of 23 August 2017

amending Regulation (EC) No 2073/2005 as regards Campylobacter in broiler carcases

 

"When testing against the process hygiene criteria set out in Row 2.1.5 and Row 2.1.9 of Chapter 2 for Salmonella and Campylobacter in poultry carcases in slaughterhouses and the tests for Salmonella and Campylobacter are carried out in the same laboratory, neck skins from a minimum of 15 poultry carcases shall be sampled at random after chilling during each sampling session. Before examination, the neck skin samples from at least three poultry carcases from the same flock of origin shall be pooled into one sample of 26 g. Thus, the neck skin samples form 5 × 26 g final samples (26 g are needed to perform analyses for Salmonella and Campylobacter from one sample in parallel). The samples shall be kept after sampling and transported to the laboratory at a temperature not lower than 1 °C and not higher than 8 °C and the time between the sampling and the testing for Campylobacter shall be of less than 48 hours in order to ensure maintenance of sample integrity. Samples that have reached a temperature of 0 °C shall not be used to verify compliance with the Campylobacter criterion. "

 

best regards,

Leila

 

Hi Leila,

 

Thks for above.

 

I note that the overall Regulation implementation date is from 1st January 2018.

 

I deduce this directive is targeted at (local) sampling/evaluating farms and slaughterhouses. Nature of the OP's product samples is unknown but the relevance of the EU directive's comments could potentially include samples other than skin.

 

Reason for "changes" to existing Camp. procedures is apparently due an observed significant reduction in Camp. on freezing, eg these 2014 articles -

 

http://www.huffingto..._n_6183520.html

http://thehygienedoc...chicken-answer/

 

 

I note as you mention this is specific to Campylobacter only. And to carcass skin samples. Positive detection level of broiler carcases apparently averaged 76% in EU in 2008. Whether, in this context, the existing transport requirements for Camp. (and others?) are already as per new  directive is unmentioned.

 

I also note the 48 hrs criterion. Not so simple if international features involved.

Thank you for your advice and introducing me to this regulation!

 

But what if you are sampling from frozen chicken samples!?


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