Jump to content

  • Quick Navigation
Photo
- - - - -

Do Standards Improve Business ?


  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
29 replies to this topic

#26 Franco

Franco

    Grade - PIFSQN

  • IFSQN Principal
  • 752 posts
  • 11 thanks
1
Neutral

  • Italy
    Italy

Posted 19 April 2005 - 07:57 AM

Hi Saferpakers,

just another couple of readings.

James Wilson Thesis

Does ISO 9000 certification pay ?

Rgds. Franco


Edited by Franco, 19 April 2005 - 07:58 AM.

  • 0
An ancient Chinese proverb teaches that the person who waits for a roast duck to fly into their mouth must wait a very long time.

#27 Simon

Simon

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Admin
  • 11,423 posts
  • 1043 thanks
227
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Manchester
  • Interests:Life, Family, Running, Cycling, Manager of a Football Team, Work, Watching Sport, The Internet, Food, Real Ale and Sleeping...

Posted 19 April 2005 - 10:03 AM

Thanks for the interesting documents Franco :( - the day documents can be put onto a chip that you can download directly to your brain through a nose socket won't be a day too soon for me. :thumbup:

The best I can tell from quickly scanning the first document is that they can't tell if there is a direct / accurate / consistent correlation between ISO 9001 Certification, MBNQA etc. and increased profits. Too many other variables that impact I guess.

I wonder if Rover had ISO 9001 Certification?

The ISO document concludes (in the last paragraph):

'Altogether, this leads us to a seemingly contradictory conclusion: the decision to seek ISO 9000 certification did lead to substantial performance improvements, but is difficult to justify in advance using a traditional cost-benefit analysis, implying that it has to be based, to some extent, on faith.' :rolleyes:

Are you convinced?

Regards,
Simon


  • 0

Best Regards,

Simon Timperley
IFSQN Administrator
 
hand-pointing-down.gif

Need food safety advice?
Relax, you've come to the right place…

The IFSQN is a helpful network of volunteers providing answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts on food safety management systems and a wide range of food safety topics.

 
We could make a huge list of rules, terms and conditions, but you probably wouldn’t read them.

All that we ask is that you observe the following:


1. No spam, profanity, pornography, trolling or personal attacks

2. Topics and posts should be “on topic” and related to site content
3. No (unpaid) advertising
4. You may have one account on the board at any one time
5. Enjoy your stay!


#28 Franco

Franco

    Grade - PIFSQN

  • IFSQN Principal
  • 752 posts
  • 11 thanks
1
Neutral

  • Italy
    Italy

Posted 20 April 2005 - 01:47 PM

Are you convinced?


I am convinced that ISO 9001 is not a standard.
Neither I do believe in current audit practice, it's not objective since it's not based on statistics and the pass / fail result is a poor one with respect to the complexity of an organization.
Hence I conclude that classification into ISO-registered and ISO not-registred goes somehow on a random basis even if all these studies are based on the assumption that there's a clear cut.
Altough I very much appreciate the effort, the results are not reliable IMHO.
Performing the analysis on EFQM or MBQA companies could be much more significant, but there are few samples, so what else ? :uhm:

FAITH ;)
  • 0
An ancient Chinese proverb teaches that the person who waits for a roast duck to fly into their mouth must wait a very long time.

#29 Jim Wade

Jim Wade

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 123 posts
  • 0 thanks
1
Neutral
  • Location:UK
  • Interests:All aspects of continual improvement

Posted 20 April 2005 - 11:44 PM

I am convinced that ISO 9001 is not a standard.


I agree, Franco.

When you apply a standard, the result is something which (given allowable variations) is the same as anything else to which you apply the standard.

In the case of management systems, we want each to be unique (to reflect the unique needs and aspirations of the organisation and its stakeholders). A standard for such things is undesirable and unhelpful.

ISO 9001 is not a standard. It's a model.

rgds Jim
  • 0

#30 Franco

Franco

    Grade - PIFSQN

  • IFSQN Principal
  • 752 posts
  • 11 thanks
1
Neutral

  • Italy
    Italy

Posted 21 April 2005 - 07:04 AM

ISO 9001 is not a standard. It's a model.


Hi Jim,
thank you for contributing to discussion. :beer:
Missed you for a while :(
Rgds. Franco
  • 0
An ancient Chinese proverb teaches that the person who waits for a roast duck to fly into their mouth must wait a very long time.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users