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Cleaning Procedures for a Glucose and Oil Store


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#1 Salamony

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Posted 31 March 2009 - 08:59 PM

Hi:
I am working at ice cream factory, we have a hot room there which consider as a dry clean area, but there we store glucose and oil and sometimes the floor get sticky with oil and glucose drops that we cannot clean them dry.
can some one advice about cleaning procedures to this area? :helpplease:



#2 Charles.C

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Posted 01 April 2009 - 05:11 AM

Dear Salamony,

Just for a starter, what is yr current cleaning procedure ?

What kind of oil ?

Air-conditioning sounds like one obvious alternative except for the oil, cost problem ? ( maybe this is a common problem, no direct experience ice-cream myself)

Better Ventilation ?

Any ice-cream makers here ? :smile:

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#3 Saviour

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Posted 01 April 2009 - 07:54 AM

Dear Salamony

Do U have any arrangement for spillage control? e.g. placement of tray etc under liquids i.e. glucose & oil etc. If not , you need to do that.
Always use tray under open /used container while & after taking out oil/glucose or any other liquid. I have seen some industry practice to keep drums tilted/horizontal for easy operation that leads to spillage when the container are open for use hence resulting spillage on floor.

I do expect youn have palletization system for Raw material storage. Not daily but you may go for hot moping with/with out soap solution on weekly basis or when every spillage is observed.

Regards
Monika



#4 Salamony

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Posted 01 April 2009 - 03:24 PM

tHANX 4 ur fast replay, :thumbup:
we have weekly cleaning for this area with water and foam but we were under international auditing and they considered it as dry area and its not allowed to use water, but really i dunno how to take spoilage away. so am asking if some1 can provide me with cleaning procedures to similar place.

N.B the area not for handling its 4 storage but as u know glucose is so heavy and always have pump leakage which lead to spoilage.



#5 AS NUR

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 12:24 AM

how about..

keep cleaning your room .. IMO just put close drainage line at the drop of oil or glucose.. and dont forget the pipe must be cover with heating system, you can use water heating system, and the end of pipe you put bucket to colect your glucose or oil.. I am sure that can make your room clean.. and if possible you can re - use the material in bucket as long as its clean and safe... :thumbup:

rgds

AS Nur



#6 Charles.C

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 03:34 AM

Dear Salamony,

I can understand yr problem. Any system which involves pumping oils/ liquids from A to B is almost impossible to prevent some leakage IMEX. Pre-packaged systems minimise this by having very well sealed linking/transfer stages but you invariably get “some” spillage I think. One, “relatively” dry, efficient option is commercial mobile suction cleaning units similar to airports but they still need to put down a localised layer of detergent first. Quite expensive though.
I don’t understand how this can be classified as a 100% dry area. Maybe I’m missing something, never seen an ice-cream line :smile: .

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#7 GMO

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 08:00 AM

I don't think anywhere which pumps glucose can be 100% dry, however, I would keep it as dry as possible. IMEX, if you have a lot of moisture in the air with sugars, they have a tendancy to be hygroscopic (ie absorb the water from the air). That'll generally mean it gets sticky, dirty and may make things difficult to pump.

IMO the best way to go would be to have removable catch trays which are removed and changed for clean dry ones daily, then a monthly deep clean where I'd remove all the stock (if that's possible in your system), perhaps cleaning with steam as mimimum water is used. I have used HFCS and glucose syrup in the past and not had leaks but we weren't using pallecons or drums, we were using full tankers! i think it is worth reviewing why you're getting the leaks If you're pumping out of the bottom of a pallecon, you could consider pumping out of the top then the connection isn't exposed.



#8 Salamony

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 10:06 AM

Thaxs for all. all of you have added smth to me. really thank u



#9 Saviour

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 10:49 AM

Good Idea GMO

Really u are a good writer. Actually you explain things the way it should be..

M impressed.

Regards



#10 MDG

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Posted 16 April 2009 - 10:12 AM

For Glucose you can use hot water of around 55°C and for oil 1% solutionmof caustic soda (Sodium hydroxide) is useful.

:rolleyes:






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