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Don

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Posted 17 September 2003 - 01:01 PM

We are a manufacturer of corrugated casing trying to achieve Catergory A certification to the BRC/IOP Technical Standard. With the layout of our older facility the issue of changing of protective clothing prior to starting work is giving rise to some discussion. Our company will be issuing protective clothing in the form of overalls and t-shirts. What is the accepted interpretation of the standard regarding employees wearing the protective clothing to and from work?

Thanks

Don



Simon

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Posted 17 September 2003 - 02:17 PM

Hi again Don,

AAAAAAAAARRRRGGGGGGGHHHHHHH! That's better, don't worry I've not gone completely mad it's just that I've recently had great turmoil with overalls, lockers, changing, laundering, wearing to and from home etc.

At least now I have some experience to share, which is good.

From your post I take it you are:

1. Providing suitable protective clothing (overalls and t-shirts), which is OK
2. Allowing employees to take them home to wash them, which is OK

For Category 'A' this is OK as there are no requirements that apply to you regarding employees wearing clothing to and from work.

The only issue then is how are you going to manage or police (2)? You will need 'appropriate guidelines' and to provide 'adequate controls' as per 7.7.3 of the standard.

Hmm! Well you will need at least:

- to set a frequency that clothing should be changed / cleaned
- chemicals to avoid / or provide a method (do's & don'ts)
- you will also have to have some sort of checking procedure (this should be pretty easy, visual / smell)

I'm winging it a bit here but hopefully it's a start Don.

Can anyone else help?

Simon


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Paul W

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Posted 29 January 2004 - 04:09 PM

It's worth reviewing section 3.2.



Simon

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Posted 29 January 2004 - 04:48 PM

It is good point. BTW welcome to the forum Paul.

Cheers,
Simon


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Edwina Chicken Currie

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Posted 10 June 2004 - 09:25 AM

Within the guidelines, good practice would include ensuring ‘incompatible' garments are washed separately. No, I don't mean segregating ‘whites' and ‘delicates'…. The cat's blanket, or the cousin's abattoir apron, must not be washed in the same load.
:bug:
Whilst I don't believe the BRC/IoP standard is specific, IMHO clean garments should be protected to prevent post wash contamination… should persons wear garments in a car where the dog roams freely??



Charles Chew

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Posted 10 June 2004 - 02:37 PM

Hi,

Being more involved with HACCP and while BRC/IOP does apply the same principles,good hygiene practices should be applied. What Fiona referred to as "risk" is essentially the potential of "cross-contaminations".

If clothes are washed and worn from home and the workers are not involved in "high risk areas" - thats generally fine.

However, if they are working in high risk areas where direct food contact products are made, then, overalls and protective clothings should be supplied at the facility. Good Hygiene Practices also means that the protective clothings should never be worn out of the facility including headgear or hairnet.

Cheers
Charles Chew


Cheers,
Charles Chew
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Simon

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Posted 11 June 2004 - 01:43 PM

Hi Fiona, Welcome back!

In the BRC/IOP 'self care' of protective clothing is allowed for Category A, whilst category B (higher level) the requirement in 7.7.4 states:

"Controlled laundering of clothing shall be carried out.'

The Recommendation on Good Practice states:

"An approved contracted and audited laundry should be used.'

Maybe this recommendation will become a requirement in the next issue, with the caveat that a suitable in-house laundry is also acceptable.

Just to say for category B suppliers the garments cannot be worn to and from home.

Regards,
Simon


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Edwina Chicken Currie

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Posted 11 June 2004 - 02:02 PM

If clothes are washed and worn from home and the workers are not involved in "high risk areas" - thats generally fine.

I will assume "high risk areas" corresponds to the BRC/IoP description for Category B materials.
I recognise that BRC/IoP allows self care of ppe for facilities making category A materials, however my comments relate to the requirement for "adequate controls and appropriate guidelines" (Section 7.7.3).

As the primary purpose of ppe is not to stop the handlers clothes from getting dirty, but to protect the item (of packaging being made/supplied) from contamination surely it (the ppe) must not become a vector of contamination?????


Simon

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Posted 14 June 2004 - 08:59 PM

Hi Fiona,

I think I missed that you were talking about Category A (7.7.3), where self care is permitted provided there are adequate controls and guidelines. Very difficult to manage - I mean what checks can the company carry out? Daily smelling of overalls, audit with magnifying glass. I can picture the operator sat at home eating a prawn curry with Whisky her pet terrier on her knee. Not good...I believe it does present a risk!

Anyone got a self-care programme in operation?
If so, how does it work?

Regards,
Simon


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