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What does 'ERD' mean to you?


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Ptinid

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 04:03 PM

I've just had a very positive discussion with a senior director of a food manufacturing who is 'into' pest control, has done a lot on pest management in his business and who is a pretty switched on guy all round.

I was surprised to find that the acronym ERD meant nothing to him. I know that acronyms abound in all industries, and this is in no way a criticism of this chap, but it got me wondering how many people outside our industry know about it and use it.

E - exclusion. Keep them out. Proofing, barriers, incoming goods control.

R - restriction. Control the environment to make it inimical to pests. This is where good hygiene SOPs come in, but also the appreciation of 'kill zones' in a process, the absence of dead spots and areas where debris (and pests) can build up.

D- Destruction. Removing the pests in the most efficient and safe manner. May be poison baits, splrays, fly killers, heat, CO2, etc.

The point is that the acronym works in the order in which these should be applied. If pests are kept out, that is better than having to control them once they are in through environmental means, which is in turn better than having to apply methods to eradicate them

Is this concept known as a specific item in the food industry generally? Does it have a different name? I know that the relative importance of exclusion and restriction is clear in AIB specs.

I'd welcome any comments and feedback.


Edited by Ptinid, 02 December 2010 - 08:16 AM.


Charles.C

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Posted 01 December 2010 - 04:43 PM

Dear ptinid,

Can you provide an appropriate link ?

I think somebody's been having you on (or vice-versa) ? :smile:

http://www.uksmallbu...CompanyID=52608

Rgds / Charles.C


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Ptinid

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Posted 02 December 2010 - 08:15 AM

Not at all Charles.

ERD is a principle of pest control that my colleagues and I have used and taught for years (far too many years if feels like). This has probably originated with the late respected John Bull from Rentokil, but I'd guess most pest controllers would recognize the accronym and the principles.

Certainly NOT a business plug - I had never come across this company before your link)

See this link - again not to my company, but mentions the npta and their guidance on Exclusion Restriction Destruction.

http://www.rcsenviro...PestControl.asp

Do your comments mean that you don't recognise this?



Mike Green

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Posted 02 December 2010 - 08:57 AM

I've just had a very positive discussion with a senior director of a food manufacturing who is 'into' pest control, has done a lot on pest management in his business and who is a pretty switched on guy all round.

I was surprised to find that the acronym ERD meant nothing to him. I know that acronyms abound in all industries, and this is in no way a criticism of this chap, but it got me wondering how many people outside our industry know about it and use it.

E - exclusion. Keep them out. Proofing, barriers, incoming goods control.

R - restriction. Control the environment to make it inimical to pests. This is where good hygiene SOPs come in, but also the appreciation of 'kill zones' in a process, the absence of dead spots and areas where debris (and pests) can build up.

D- Destruction. Removing the pests in the most efficient and safe manner. May be poison baits, splrays, fly killers, heat, CO2, etc.

The point is that the acronym works in the order in which these should be applied. If pests are kept out, that is better than having to control them once they are in through environmental means, which is in turn better than having to apply methods to eradicate them

Is this concept known as a specific item in the food industry generally? Does it have a different name? I know that the relative importance of exclusion and restriction is clear in AIB specs.

I'd welcome any comments and feedback.


I think everyone is familiar with the principles-but to be honest the only occurrence of the accronym I've personally seen is via the CIEH (god love 'em!)-doc attached

Attached Files


Edited by Mike Green, 02 December 2010 - 08:58 AM.

I may sound like a complete idiot...but actually there are a couple of bits missing

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Charles.C

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Posted 02 December 2010 - 12:59 PM

Dear ptinid,

Do your comments mean that you don't recognise this?


If by "this" you meant ERD, I'm afraid i didn't, and nor did Sir Google whom i first consulted via "ERD pest" to minimise the likelihood of instant correction. :smile:
(the only simultaneous hit on both words as stated was to 2 Hungarian names associated with Greataupair.com (seemingly [?] not quite what I expected :biggrin: )

I honestly don't think i hv ever seen it utilised in any Food Hygiene textbooks ?

Admittedly, I'd never heard of npta either except for a recent thread on this forum. perhaps it doesn't exist outside of EC ?

On the other hand, if you say Rentokil, the bulbs light up.

Regardless, i shall definitely not forget it now thanks to yr quick summary :clap:

(didn't know CO2 was used as a fumigant, in my previous experience CH3Br was the standard, dangerous stuff)

@ Mike - great attachment. The rat (mouse?) looks so cute without the teeth showing. (for other readers ERD = section 10, this time not so cute a picture!)

Rgds / Charles.C

PS was there a "ERD" in yr link somewhere, couldn't find it. I noted was a Scottish outfit, regional popularity perhaps?)

Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


MRios

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 10:19 PM

Never heard of the acronym either, but I certainly am familiar and apply these principles.
CH3Br is being banned completely in my country next year, for food facilities, but still will be used for fumigating wood. Now the whole point of using CH3Br was the disinfecting effect it had, especially in hard to reach places. In flour mills, where you have "dry" cleaning procedures, it was our first choice.
Does CO2 have the same disinfecting effect? What other alternatives are there. I´ve also heard of thermal means, but our facilities are not sufficientely air tight, so I´m not sure it would be effective.



Ptinid

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Posted 15 December 2010 - 05:03 PM

Never heard of the acronym either, but I certainly am familiar and apply these principles.
CH3Br is being banned completely in my country next year, for food facilities, but still will be used for fumigating wood. Now the whole point of using CH3Br was the disinfecting effect it had, especially in hard to reach places. In flour mills, where you have "dry" cleaning procedures, it was our first choice.
Does CO2 have the same disinfecting effect? What other alternatives are there. I´ve also heard of thermal means, but our facilities are not sufficientely air tight, so I´m not sure it would be effective.


Thanks for your feedback, guys. Since we use the acronym a lot, it was useful to understand that it is our own jargon, rather than a 'universal' acronym. Now to your specific questions.

CO2 as a fumigant is useless for mills, as it requires exacting temperature and concentration standards to be effective. It is ideally used as a small commodity or single bit of kit fumigant in my view.

Heat can be effective in mills for, again, small pieces of kit, elevators, scroll, screens etc., but it does have limitations. The major one is not the need for air-tightness - in fact it should not be air tight. You want the heat to transfer to the item being treated and the best way to encourage heat transfer is by controlling the airflow where you want it to go. By far the biggest problem with heat is the need to clean properly first. Deposits of flour only a few centimeters thick will insulate well enough to allow many stored product pests to survive. If cleaned first, however, the heat will kill eggs and larvae living in the small spaces that otherwise cannot be cleaned. Elevator legs are a classic example of this. Second problem is that of 'heat sinks'. A bit of kit bolted onto a concrete floor will probably never reach the required temperatures in the spaced between the machine and the concrete. That can, however, be overcome by use of insecticide and good denso-mastic sealers to fully seal these joints.

Whole building head treatment is possible, but the experience is that it has such severe limitations that it is not successful.

Having said all that, many of the same limitations were there for CH3Br - just not well recognised. Ultimately, most whole building CH3Br fumigations actually failed - or else they would not have had to be repeated every 6 or 12 months! And they failed because of the flour left in systems and in the fabric of buildings. Some failures were due to gas loss, but I firmly believe most wa due to the misguided belief that the gas penetrated everywhere. It will not penetrate flour deposits in the limited time most mills had available under gas.

Final fumigant choice is Sulphuryl Fluroide SO2F2. The most common trade names are Vikane nd Profume. Highly toxic, difficult to handle, and limited approvals, if any, in many countries. I have no personal experience of this, having been out of fumigation for a number of years now.

I am a firm believer in good, effective hygiene systems to control pests, rather than reliance on 'quick fixes' that ultimately only mask the real problems

.....and on that controversial note, I'll sneak off! :whistle:


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Posted 21 December 2010 - 05:15 AM

Thanks for the knowledge sharing.





Charles.C

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Posted 21 December 2010 - 07:21 AM

Dear Ptinid,

Missed yr reply first time round. :thumbup:

Appreciate yr experienced input.

I agree with yr comments on fumigation. i had some experience with ship-board fumigation and the destination result unfortunately often displayed the limitations.

Rgds / Charles.C


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Charles.C


Caddyshack

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Posted 21 December 2010 - 11:55 AM

Never heard of ERD in Pest Control terms sorry??!!






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