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HACCP Question related to wooden pallets

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Zolita

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Posted 08 March 2011 - 10:37 AM

Hi All
Your input would be appreciated. I consult to a bakery implementing GMPs in order to get to HACCP accreditation. They would like to have flour delivered to the bakery dry store on wooden pallets and stored on wooden pallets in the dry store. I have advised against this for obvious reasons. They however say that the company that delivers the bakery is HACCP compliant and other HACCP compliant bakeries accept wooden pallets. So they too want to do this. I have said that the pallets are probably identified as a CCP and the correct preventative measures taken in the other organisations. This would require us to do the same, so rather no wooden pallets - but they don't agree.

Any ideas or suggestions or am I being impossible.

Any feedback would be appreciated

Zolita



GMO

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Posted 08 March 2011 - 12:07 PM

I don't agree either. Sure, it's not ideal but it's common practice to use wooden pallets in the food industry for ingredients and it's too costly to do otherwise IME. You can do several things to control the risk:

1. Only accept and use unbroken chep type (blue) pallets.
2. Have a layer card or similar between the pallet and the sacks.
3. Transfer to another area not containing wood for decanting.
4. All part used bags to be decanted fully into a sealable food container.
5. Pallet quality to be checked as part of auditing including including ensuring no open food bags (especially in racking).
6. No wood allowed in open product areas

You could compile all of the above into a wood policy.



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Zolita

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Posted 08 March 2011 - 12:12 PM

Thank you that does make it much more feasable. Get right to it!!

Hi All
Your input would be appreciated. I consult to a bakery implementing GMPs in order to get to HACCP accreditation. They would like to have flour delivered to the bakery dry store on wooden pallets and stored on wooden pallets in the dry store. I have advised against this for obvious reasons. They however say that the company that delivers the bakery is HACCP compliant and other HACCP compliant bakeries accept wooden pallets. So they too want to do this. I have said that the pallets are probably identified as a CCP and the correct preventative measures taken in the other organisations. This would require us to do the same, so rather no wooden pallets - but they don't agree.

Any ideas or suggestions or am I being impossible.

Any feedback would be appreciated

Zolita



GMO

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Posted 08 March 2011 - 01:30 PM

Glad to have helped. I think this would form a logical prerequsite for wood control if the factory agrees.



MQA

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 02:19 AM

As a consultant, I am surprised you are unaware of this already? :unsure: Is this your first client in the bakery industry?

Here's some info from the SQF standard. It's great info in developing your own Wood Policy.

Wood pallets are part of the food industry and are not expected to be banned from processing environments. Depending on the type of facility and the products being produced, the types of controls for the management of pallets can vary from one facility to another. At a minimum, all general processing facilities should have a pallet management program in place where pallets undergo inspection for broken slats or wood pieces protruding which could pose a risk to pallets. Also, if pallets are stored for prolonged periods outdoor, then the pallets may need to be cleaned and inspected for vermin prior to entry into the processing facility. For high risk operations and wet processing environments, the use of clean slip sheets or plastic pallets should be utilized to help to minimize the risk of foreign material or microbiological contamination to the products.

Check it out here on page 85.

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Foodworker

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 10:11 AM

It seems to be a current theory that plastic pallets are the panacea to all foreign body problems.

The important thing is that the pallet should be in good condition whatever it is made of. I have seen a lot of broken plastic pallets as well as wooden ones.

Plastic pallets can be washed which is an advantage, but the washing can also lead to other problems. It is very difficult to dry plastic pallets, particulary with some designs where there are intricate strengthening mouldings or hollow sections. This can actually increase the micro risk in some cases.


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Carlos Leoncini

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Posted 19 March 2011 - 11:01 PM

Hi All. A wooden pallet could hardly be CCP because a CCP is a critical step of a process where you a apply critical control. A wooden pallet is just raw material. You will have to study the whole process (or processes) where wooden pallets are used. Understand the hazards and risks (apply haccp), and just then go back to the original question. This analysis could sound dogmantic but misunderstanding the meaning of words and haccp concepts is the best way to assure failure, as I have seen so many times in so many different organizations.



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Posted 20 March 2011 - 05:27 AM

I don't agree either. Sure, it's not ideal but it's common practice to use wooden pallets in the food industry for ingredients and it's too costly to do otherwise IME. You can do several things to control the risk:

1. Only accept and use unbroken chep type (blue) pallets.
2. Have a layer card or similar between the pallet and the sacks.
3. Transfer to another area not containing wood for decanting.
4. All part used bags to be decanted fully into a sealable food container.
5. Pallet quality to be checked as part of auditing including including ensuring no open food bags (especially in racking).
6. No wood allowed in open product areas

You could compile all of the above into a wood policy.


Sound advice.

From experience stacking can be a problem area especially if the bottom of the pallets are not checked. I would avoid double stacking where possible & if not use layer boards.


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Posted 03 August 2011 - 11:43 AM

I'm sorry, but I don't understand the meaning of word "decanting" concerning this situation... :helpplease: Can you explain it, please.
I'm soryy, my English is not very well.

I don't agree either. Sure, it's not ideal but it's common practice to use wooden pallets in the food industry for ingredients and it's too costly to do otherwise IME. You can do several things to control the risk:

1. Only accept and use unbroken chep type (blue) pallets.
2. Have a layer card or similar between the pallet and the sacks.
3. Transfer to another area not containing wood for decanting.
4. All part used bags to be decanted fully into a sealable food container.
5. Pallet quality to be checked as part of auditing including including ensuring no open food bags (especially in racking).
6. No wood allowed in open product areas

You could compile all of the above into a wood policy.



MQA

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Posted 04 September 2011 - 04:10 AM

I'm sorry, but I don't understand the meaning of word "decanting" concerning this situation... :helpplease: Can you explain it, please.
I'm soryy, my English is not very well.


4. All part used bags to be decanted fully into a sealable food container.

Empty / pour the part used bags into a sealable food container.

Edited by JAKMQA, 04 September 2011 - 04:11 AM.


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foodsafetyboy

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Posted 04 September 2011 - 07:40 AM

As a consultant, I am surprised you are unaware of this already? :unsure: Is this your first client in the bakery industry?

Here's some info from the SQF standard. It's great info in developing your own Wood Policy.

Wood pallets are part of the food industry and are not expected to be banned from processing environments. Depending on the type of facility and the products being produced, the types of controls for the management of pallets can vary from one facility to another. At a minimum, all general processing facilities should have a pallet management program in place where pallets undergo inspection for broken slats or wood pieces protruding which could pose a risk to pallets. Also, if pallets are stored for prolonged periods outdoor, then the pallets may need to be cleaned and inspected for vermin prior to entry into the processing facility. For high risk operations and wet processing environments, the use of clean slip sheets or plastic pallets should be utilized to help to minimize the risk of foreign material or microbiological contamination to the products.

Check it out here on page 85.



This information is really helpful, thank very much Sir.
Wooden pallets can be used as long as it can be properly cleaned and disinfected and if itwas clearly proved that its use will not be a source of contamination




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