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#1 rellie

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Posted 20 April 2011 - 08:41 AM

Hi all.

I am currently reviewing our Foreign Matter Policy and am wondering if anyone would have a sample procedure I could have a look at.

Thanks :helpplease:



#2 Charles.C

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Posted 20 April 2011 - 11:18 AM

Dear rellie,

Welcome to the forum ! :welcome:

Foreign Matter


A little background might help ? :smile: Product ? Process ?

Rgds / Charles.C

Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#3 Dr Ajay Shah

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Posted 20 April 2011 - 12:00 PM

Hi Rellie,

Can you please enlighten us with the type of products that you are manufacturing and the process involved and am sure you will get members to respond to your query.

Regards

Ajay


Dr Ajay Shah.,
BSc (Hons), MSc, PhD, PGCE(FE)
Managing Director & Principal Consultant
AAS Food Technology Pty Ltd
www.aasfood.com


#4 rellie

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Posted 20 April 2011 - 11:13 PM

Hi.

It is a milk manufacturing facility. The main sources of foreign matter are wood, glass and metal.

Thanks



#5 Zeeshan

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Posted 21 April 2011 - 06:54 AM

Hi all.

I am currently reviewing our Foreign Matter Policy and am wondering if anyone would have a sample procedure I could have a look at.

Thanks :helpplease:


Attached are the sample policy and a relevant format to be used in case of accidental contamination.

Attached File  Glass, Wood & Metal poilcy.pdf   35.5KB   2014 downloads

Attached File  Physical Contamination Incident Report.pdf   81.16KB   1732 downloads

Hope it helps!

Regards:
M.Zeeshan

#6 MQA

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 09:40 AM

I think more information should be provided in the policies.

If you don't specify the type of elements not permitted, they may be overlooked. For example, also consider for wood clipboards and utensils.

The policy should include:

  • Specifically what is not permitted
  • Method of control
  • Corrective Actions
I like the Incident Report form though. :biggrin:

... helping you achieve food safety & quality assurance...

Melbourne Quality Assurance | Australia
www.melbourneqa.com | janette@melbourneqa.com
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#7 Charles.C

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Posted 24 April 2011 - 06:32 AM

Dear Jakmqa,

I would hv thought it rather depends on how general you like a policy to be ? :smile:

The details are perhaps more effectively presented in the associated procedure "a la" ISO, but maybe not as per BRC ?

Additionally, the more you include, the likelier the chance of a pre-emptive auditorial strike maybe ? :smile:

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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#8 MQA

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Posted 13 June 2011 - 12:38 AM

My support of more information comes from physical contamination customer complaints over the years. I think staff should specifically be told (trained) what type of elements are excluded and permitted.

Yes, we know wood, glass, plastic, or some metals are not permitted but sometimes, we can "forget" that yes, wooden clipboards are also not permitted. Being specific eliminates the forgetfulness or "I didn't think of that" or "oops".


For example:

  • Wooden pallets. Permitted within the premises but not within the process areas
  • Clipboards should not be wooden or plastic
  • Some equipment have glass dials
  • Ensure all pens supplied do not have detachable lids
  • Eliminating "band-aid" solutions of string, tape, cardboard on plant and equipment
  • Ensuring no staples or paperclips on paperwork by the production desk


... helping you achieve food safety & quality assurance...

Melbourne Quality Assurance | Australia
www.melbourneqa.com | janette@melbourneqa.com
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#9 zoloo

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Posted 01 July 2011 - 03:11 AM

Dear,

How to control product label in the frame of ISO 22000 requirements.

Regards ,


Zoloo, from Mongolia



#10 Tony-C

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Posted 01 July 2011 - 08:40 AM

My support of more information comes from physical contamination customer complaints over the years.


Complaint information and examples can be useful in briefing & training staff regarding foreign body control.

:huh: I haven't seen a wooden/board clipboard for around 20 years - something like this and pens can easily be covered of in policy: "Only company issue clipboards & detectable pens permitted in production areas"

Edited by Tony-C, 01 July 2011 - 08:41 AM.


#11 ultramar2010

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 08:09 PM

I have something that could be usuful:

 

 

 

  1. Introduction

Companyhas established, documented and implemented a foreign body detection policy for the site, which is maintained in order to meet the requirements of the Food Safety Quality Management System and ensure the safe production of products.

 

  1. Policy

Glass and Brittle Plastic:

Companyis committed to reduce, and where possible eliminate, the potential of Glass, Brittle and Hard Plastic, Ceramics and Similar Materials contamination in the products, which are being processed or handled at the company’s processing and storage areas.

Companywill take all possible precautions to prevent such contamination. As a consequence, the aim of this policy is to introduce preventive measures and good manufacturing practices to ensure that risks of such contamination are minimized.

Companyhas not permitted the use of glass, plastic and ceramic items in processing and storage areas. Glass windows are not used within production and storage areas. Lighting fixtures installed within production and storage areas have appropriate shelter in case of accidental breakage of lightening source.

 

Wood:

In areas where a risk assessment has identified the potential for product contamination from wood, the use of wood will be excluded. Where the use of wood cannot be avoided, and the risk is managed, the condition of wood is regularly checked to ensure it is in good condition and clean.

 

Metal:

The use of sharp metal implements, including knives, cutting blades on equipment, needles and wires will be controlled. This includes suitable controls both into and out of the plant and warehouse, and safe disposal.

Snap-off blade knives are not permitted in processing and storage areas.

Procedures will be developed and implemented that non-production equipment and maintenance tools would not be left in a position that allows them to contaminate the product.

 

  1. Scope

The scope of the Foreign Body Detection Policy only applies to machine product items. Some hand packed items are subject to manual inspection.

 

  1. Legal definition

A physical hazard in food is any extraneous object or foreign matter that may cause illness or injury to the consumer.

  • Foreign objects smaller than 7 mm rarely cause trauma or serious injury except in special high-risk groups, such as infants, surgery patients and the elderly.
  • Glass is the most frequently reported foreign material in food to cause illness or injury.
  • FDA Health Hazard Evaluation Board conclusions in cases of foreign materials (1972–1997) found that 56 percent of objects 1–6 mm in size might pose a limited acute hazard. For objects greater than 6 mm, only 2.9 percent were judged to present no hazard.

 

  1. Types of Physical Hazards

The type of foreign objects in food affects the technology needed to detect it:

  1. Glass: Sharp glass contamination often occurs during filling processes in glass containers if a container is accidentally broken. Another source, but less frequent, is light bulbs broken during building maintenance.
  2. Metal: Sharp metal objects may include screws and equipment splinters, blades, broken veterinary needles, fragments and clippings of prior processing procedures.
  3. Plastics: Soft and hard plastics may come from packaging material of an intermediary production phase.
  4. Wood: Wood splinters may have their origin at the farm or may come from handling wooden pallets.
  5. Stones: Small stones are more common in crops like peas or beans contaminated during harvest.

 

  1. Metal Detection

Based on risk assessment the Food Safety Team has confirmed that metal detection is a crucial control measure to some processes to prevent any metal which may come in contact with the product (loose nuts and bolts etc.) from being sent out to the customer. Metal in product will affect the company’s reputation and may seriously injure the consumer if swallowed. A sensitivity and timing check is carried out before starting production and every hour throughout production to ensure the metal detector continues to work effectively. This procedure describes the testing procedure of metal detectors.

  • Ferrous is both magnetic and conductive so easily detected.
  • Non-ferrous is non-magnetic but a good or excellent conductor so relatively easily detected.
  • Stainless steel is the most difficult contaminant to detect as it is usually non-magnetic and a poor conductor. Stainless steel comes in various grades, some of which are magnetic varying to totally non magnetic. Their conductivity also varies, but is generally low. Both of these factors contribute to poor detectability.

The test sticks used are:

3.0 mm ferrous test stick

3.0 mm non-ferrous test stick

4.0 mm stainless steel stick

The QC technician and the production operator are responsible for carrying out metal detection checks every hour. The metal detection checks are audited every month by the Quality Assurance Manager.

Monthly inspections, maintenance and calibration are done by the equipment manufacturer, authorized factory representative or trained contractor. 

 

  1. Test
  1. Place the wand or stick on the on the tubular plastic holder. In the same direction that the conveyor runs.
  2. Pass the wand and the tubular holder through the metal detector and verify if the system is activated.
  3. Repeat the same process with the rest of sticks.
  4. Record the test on to the Micro-Baggers Metal Detector Log or Tunnel Heater Metal Detector Log.

 

  1. Rejected Products
  1. Rejected packs must be investigated.
  2. Pass the rejected products through the detector positioned in the same way as they were when they originally went through the search head.
  3. Then pass the same products through the search head twice more, each time positioned in different ways.
  4. If at any stage the products are rejected again, it is essential to find the contaminant and identify it, and take any necessary action to ensure similar contamination does not recur.
  5. Fill out the Incident Report.
  6. In case of false positives due to high moisture in the sample, record the number of rejected packs per shift in the comments section, form QMR025.

 

  1. If the metal detector fails to reject the testing wands
  1. Stop the line and notify immediately to the supervisor.
  2. Isolate all products produced since the last satisfactory test and re-screen them, using another detector functioning to the same standard as the original system on test, or the same detector after being recalibrated.
  3. If the product cannot be rechecked, it will be put on hold to be metal detected later.
  4. Additionally, all products produced since the last clear metal detection check must be placed on hold and rechecked.  The details must be recorded on to the Micro-Baggers Metal Detector Log or Tunnel Heater Metal Detector Log.
  5. The stock may be transferred to the warehouse if there are stored, but must be retained in a segregated area.
  6. The pallets must be clearly labeled with “do not use” tape and the notation NOT METAL DETECTED written on the Pallet Label.
  7. As product from each pallet is prepared for passing through the detector, the existing pallet label must be removed and the pallet number, product and best before code information, transferred to a new label.
  8. When the complete pallet has been passed through the detector the operator must sign the new label and enter the date and time.  The completed label is then attached to the pallet.
  9. A master list of pallets must be completed indicating sequential pallet numbers, product description, date inspected (metal detection check) and signed by supervisory management.
  10. Any product failing the metal detection check must be isolated and retained for inspection by the QA Manager.

 

  1. Metal Detector Operation and Training
  1. Only authorized personnel are permitted to operate the Metal Detector when they have fully completed their training.
  2. Only authorized and trained engineers are permitted to adjust metal detector settings.
  3. Records of training are fully documented and held in the Training Program Log.


#12 fgjuadi

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 09:11 PM

 

I have something that could be usuful:

 

Holy cow, that is useful! 


.--. .- -. - ... / --- .--. - .. --- -. .- .-..

#13 luna_blue

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 04:36 AM

 

I have something that could be usuful:

 

 

This is really good. Thanks.



#14 Charles.C

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 10:05 AM

Dear ultramar,

 

Thank you for the useful Procedure.

 

I would offer a few comments / queries

 

(a)The "Policy" appears to be similar to  that attached in Post #5

 

(b) Adding  a policy statement relating to prevent/eliminate metal contamination of the finished product might be useful (ie similar to that for glass etc).

 

© The "scope" appears to additionally relate to glass, brittle plastic ....metal contaminants

 

(d) "Legal definition" - i assume this procedure was intended for USA. i don't recall seeing any FDA usage of the term "legal". can you provide a link ?

 

(e) The wand "test" procedure, eg "tubular holder", seems obscure / unorthodox, eg no product effect / detector geometry allowed for ?.

 

(f) The value of test wands seems unusually generous unless some specific product dimension / machine aperture is limiting., eg compare wand data to that in  -

http://www.ifsqn.com...indpost&p=72265

 

Thanks again,

 

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#15 dandy0215

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Posted 26 September 2014 - 03:35 PM

Could anyone help me with a preventive measure for wood contamination.  A little info: customer found wood in a combo of meat, in the middle of the combo.  I've conducted an investigation into how this could have happened and am coming up empty handed.  Is retraining of our Foreign Material SOP & responsibilities regarding inspection, monitoring, & discovery sufficient? Thank you in advance.



#16 LalangBird

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Posted 11 July 2015 - 08:56 AM

 

I have something that could be usuful:

 

 

 

  1. Introduction

Companyhas established, documented and implemented a foreign body detection policy for the site, which is maintained in order to meet the requirements of the Food Safety Quality Management System and ensure the safe production of products.

 

  1. Policy

Glass and Brittle Plastic:

Companyis committed to reduce, and where possible eliminate, the potential of Glass, Brittle and Hard Plastic, Ceramics and Similar Materials contamination in the products, which are being processed or handled at the company’s processing and storage areas.

Companywill take all possible precautions to prevent such contamination. As a consequence, the aim of this policy is to introduce preventive measures and good manufacturing practices to ensure that risks of such contamination are minimized.

Companyhas not permitted the use of glass, plastic and ceramic items in processing and storage areas. Glass windows are not used within production and storage areas. Lighting fixtures installed within production and storage areas have appropriate shelter in case of accidental breakage of lightening source.

 

Wood:

In areas where a risk assessment has identified the potential for product contamination from wood, the use of wood will be excluded. Where the use of wood cannot be avoided, and the risk is managed, the condition of wood is regularly checked to ensure it is in good condition and clean.

 

Metal:

The use of sharp metal implements, including knives, cutting blades on equipment, needles and wires will be controlled. This includes suitable controls both into and out of the plant and warehouse, and safe disposal.

Snap-off blade knives are not permitted in processing and storage areas.

Procedures will be developed and implemented that non-production equipment and maintenance tools would not be left in a position that allows them to contaminate the product.

 

  1. Scope

The scope of the Foreign Body Detection Policy only applies to machine product items. Some hand packed items are subject to manual inspection.

 

  1. Legal definition

A physical hazard in food is any extraneous object or foreign matter that may cause illness or injury to the consumer.

  • Foreign objects smaller than 7 mm rarely cause trauma or serious injury except in special high-risk groups, such as infants, surgery patients and the elderly.
  • Glass is the most frequently reported foreign material in food to cause illness or injury.
  • FDA Health Hazard Evaluation Board conclusions in cases of foreign materials (1972–1997) found that 56 percent of objects 1–6 mm in size might pose a limited acute hazard. For objects greater than 6 mm, only 2.9 percent were judged to present no hazard.

 

  1. Types of Physical Hazards

The type of foreign objects in food affects the technology needed to detect it:

  1. Glass: Sharp glass contamination often occurs during filling processes in glass containers if a container is accidentally broken. Another source, but less frequent, is light bulbs broken during building maintenance.
  2. Metal: Sharp metal objects may include screws and equipment splinters, blades, broken veterinary needles, fragments and clippings of prior processing procedures.
  3. Plastics: Soft and hard plastics may come from packaging material of an intermediary production phase.
  4. Wood: Wood splinters may have their origin at the farm or may come from handling wooden pallets.
  5. Stones: Small stones are more common in crops like peas or beans contaminated during harvest.

 

  1. Metal Detection

Based on risk assessment the Food Safety Team has confirmed that metal detection is a crucial control measure to some processes to prevent any metal which may come in contact with the product (loose nuts and bolts etc.) from being sent out to the customer. Metal in product will affect the company’s reputation and may seriously injure the consumer if swallowed. A sensitivity and timing check is carried out before starting production and every hour throughout production to ensure the metal detector continues to work effectively. This procedure describes the testing procedure of metal detectors.

  • Ferrous is both magnetic and conductive so easily detected.
  • Non-ferrous is non-magnetic but a good or excellent conductor so relatively easily detected.
  • Stainless steel is the most difficult contaminant to detect as it is usually non-magnetic and a poor conductor. Stainless steel comes in various grades, some of which are magnetic varying to totally non magnetic. Their conductivity also varies, but is generally low. Both of these factors contribute to poor detectability.

The test sticks used are:

3.0 mm ferrous test stick

3.0 mm non-ferrous test stick

4.0 mm stainless steel stick

The QC technician and the production operator are responsible for carrying out metal detection checks every hour. The metal detection checks are audited every month by the Quality Assurance Manager.

Monthly inspections, maintenance and calibration are done by the equipment manufacturer, authorized factory representative or trained contractor. 

 

  1. Test
  1. Place the wand or stick on the on the tubular plastic holder. In the same direction that the conveyor runs.
  2. Pass the wand and the tubular holder through the metal detector and verify if the system is activated.
  3. Repeat the same process with the rest of sticks.
  4. Record the test on to the Micro-Baggers Metal Detector Log or Tunnel Heater Metal Detector Log.

 

  1. Rejected Products
  1. Rejected packs must be investigated.
  2. Pass the rejected products through the detector positioned in the same way as they were when they originally went through the search head.
  3. Then pass the same products through the search head twice more, each time positioned in different ways.
  4. If at any stage the products are rejected again, it is essential to find the contaminant and identify it, and take any necessary action to ensure similar contamination does not recur.
  5. Fill out the Incident Report.
  6. In case of false positives due to high moisture in the sample, record the number of rejected packs per shift in the comments section, form QMR025.

 

  1. If the metal detector fails to reject the testing wands
  1. Stop the line and notify immediately to the supervisor.
  2. Isolate all products produced since the last satisfactory test and re-screen them, using another detector functioning to the same standard as the original system on test, or the same detector after being recalibrated.
  3. If the product cannot be rechecked, it will be put on hold to be metal detected later.
  4. Additionally, all products produced since the last clear metal detection check must be placed on hold and rechecked.  The details must be recorded on to the Micro-Baggers Metal Detector Log or Tunnel Heater Metal Detector Log.
  5. The stock may be transferred to the warehouse if there are stored, but must be retained in a segregated area.
  6. The pallets must be clearly labeled with “do not use” tape and the notation NOT METAL DETECTED written on the Pallet Label.
  7. As product from each pallet is prepared for passing through the detector, the existing pallet label must be removed and the pallet number, product and best before code information, transferred to a new label.
  8. When the complete pallet has been passed through the detector the operator must sign the new label and enter the date and time.  The completed label is then attached to the pallet.
  9. A master list of pallets must be completed indicating sequential pallet numbers, product description, date inspected (metal detection check) and signed by supervisory management.
  10. Any product failing the metal detection check must be isolated and retained for inspection by the QA Manager.

 

  1. Metal Detector Operation and Training
  1. Only authorized personnel are permitted to operate the Metal Detector when they have fully completed their training.
  2. Only authorized and trained engineers are permitted to adjust metal detector settings.
  3. Records of training are fully documented and held in the Training Program Log.

 

thanks for this useful guide. really helped me a lot :D



#17 Wasila

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Posted 25 April 2018 - 09:05 AM

 

I have something that could be usuful:

 

 

 

  1. Introduction

Companyhas established, documented and implemented a foreign body detection policy for the site, which is maintained in order to meet the requirements of the Food Safety Quality Management System and ensure the safe production of products.

 

  1. Policy

Glass and Brittle Plastic:

Companyis committed to reduce, and where possible eliminate, the potential of Glass, Brittle and Hard Plastic, Ceramics and Similar Materials contamination in the products, which are being processed or handled at the company’s processing and storage areas.

Companywill take all possible precautions to prevent such contamination. As a consequence, the aim of this policy is to introduce preventive measures and good manufacturing practices to ensure that risks of such contamination are minimized.

Companyhas not permitted the use of glass, plastic and ceramic items in processing and storage areas. Glass windows are not used within production and storage areas. Lighting fixtures installed within production and storage areas have appropriate shelter in case of accidental breakage of lightening source.

 

Wood:

In areas where a risk assessment has identified the potential for product contamination from wood, the use of wood will be excluded. Where the use of wood cannot be avoided, and the risk is managed, the condition of wood is regularly checked to ensure it is in good condition and clean.

 

Metal:

The use of sharp metal implements, including knives, cutting blades on equipment, needles and wires will be controlled. This includes suitable controls both into and out of the plant and warehouse, and safe disposal.

Snap-off blade knives are not permitted in processing and storage areas.

Procedures will be developed and implemented that non-production equipment and maintenance tools would not be left in a position that allows them to contaminate the product.

 

  1. Scope

The scope of the Foreign Body Detection Policy only applies to machine product items. Some hand packed items are subject to manual inspection.

 

  1. Legal definition

A physical hazard in food is any extraneous object or foreign matter that may cause illness or injury to the consumer.

  • Foreign objects smaller than 7 mm rarely cause trauma or serious injury except in special high-risk groups, such as infants, surgery patients and the elderly.
  • Glass is the most frequently reported foreign material in food to cause illness or injury.
  • FDA Health Hazard Evaluation Board conclusions in cases of foreign materials (1972–1997) found that 56 percent of objects 1–6 mm in size might pose a limited acute hazard. For objects greater than 6 mm, only 2.9 percent were judged to present no hazard.

 

  1. Types of Physical Hazards

The type of foreign objects in food affects the technology needed to detect it:

  1. Glass: Sharp glass contamination often occurs during filling processes in glass containers if a container is accidentally broken. Another source, but less frequent, is light bulbs broken during building maintenance.
  2. Metal: Sharp metal objects may include screws and equipment splinters, blades, broken veterinary needles, fragments and clippings of prior processing procedures.
  3. Plastics: Soft and hard plastics may come from packaging material of an intermediary production phase.
  4. Wood: Wood splinters may have their origin at the farm or may come from handling wooden pallets.
  5. Stones: Small stones are more common in crops like peas or beans contaminated during harvest.

 

  1. Metal Detection

Based on risk assessment the Food Safety Team has confirmed that metal detection is a crucial control measure to some processes to prevent any metal which may come in contact with the product (loose nuts and bolts etc.) from being sent out to the customer. Metal in product will affect the company’s reputation and may seriously injure the consumer if swallowed. A sensitivity and timing check is carried out before starting production and every hour throughout production to ensure the metal detector continues to work effectively. This procedure describes the testing procedure of metal detectors.

  • Ferrous is both magnetic and conductive so easily detected.
  • Non-ferrous is non-magnetic but a good or excellent conductor so relatively easily detected.
  • Stainless steel is the most difficult contaminant to detect as it is usually non-magnetic and a poor conductor. Stainless steel comes in various grades, some of which are magnetic varying to totally non magnetic. Their conductivity also varies, but is generally low. Both of these factors contribute to poor detectability.

The test sticks used are:

3.0 mm ferrous test stick

3.0 mm non-ferrous test stick

4.0 mm stainless steel stick

The QC technician and the production operator are responsible for carrying out metal detection checks every hour. The metal detection checks are audited every month by the Quality Assurance Manager.

Monthly inspections, maintenance and calibration are done by the equipment manufacturer, authorized factory representative or trained contractor. 

 

  1. Test
  1. Place the wand or stick on the on the tubular plastic holder. In the same direction that the conveyor runs.
  2. Pass the wand and the tubular holder through the metal detector and verify if the system is activated.
  3. Repeat the same process with the rest of sticks.
  4. Record the test on to the Micro-Baggers Metal Detector Log or Tunnel Heater Metal Detector Log.

 

  1. Rejected Products
  1. Rejected packs must be investigated.
  2. Pass the rejected products through the detector positioned in the same way as they were when they originally went through the search head.
  3. Then pass the same products through the search head twice more, each time positioned in different ways.
  4. If at any stage the products are rejected again, it is essential to find the contaminant and identify it, and take any necessary action to ensure similar contamination does not recur.
  5. Fill out the Incident Report.
  6. In case of false positives due to high moisture in the sample, record the number of rejected packs per shift in the comments section, form QMR025.

 

  1. If the metal detector fails to reject the testing wands
  1. Stop the line and notify immediately to the supervisor.
  2. Isolate all products produced since the last satisfactory test and re-screen them, using another detector functioning to the same standard as the original system on test, or the same detector after being recalibrated.
  3. If the product cannot be rechecked, it will be put on hold to be metal detected later.
  4. Additionally, all products produced since the last clear metal detection check must be placed on hold and rechecked.  The details must be recorded on to the Micro-Baggers Metal Detector Log or Tunnel Heater Metal Detector Log.
  5. The stock may be transferred to the warehouse if there are stored, but must be retained in a segregated area.
  6. The pallets must be clearly labeled with “do not use” tape and the notation NOT METAL DETECTED written on the Pallet Label.
  7. As product from each pallet is prepared for passing through the detector, the existing pallet label must be removed and the pallet number, product and best before code information, transferred to a new label.
  8. When the complete pallet has been passed through the detector the operator must sign the new label and enter the date and time.  The completed label is then attached to the pallet.
  9. A master list of pallets must be completed indicating sequential pallet numbers, product description, date inspected (metal detection check) and signed by supervisory management.
  10. Any product failing the metal detection check must be isolated and retained for inspection by the QA Manager.

 

  1. Metal Detector Operation and Training
  1. Only authorized personnel are permitted to operate the Metal Detector when they have fully completed their training.
  2. Only authorized and trained engineers are permitted to adjust metal detector settings.
  3. Records of training are fully documented and held in the Training Program Log.

 

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#18 qad@kefaloscheese.com

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Posted 12 April 2021 - 11:24 AM

thank you all



#19 Charles.C

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Posted 12 April 2021 - 02:04 PM

 

 


  1. Legal definition

A physical hazard in food is any extraneous object or foreign matter that may cause illness or injury to the consumer.

  • Foreign objects smaller than 7 mm rarely cause trauma or serious injury except in special high-risk groups, such as infants, surgery patients and the elderly.
  • Glass is the most frequently reported foreign material in food to cause illness or injury.
  • FDA Health Hazard Evaluation Board conclusions in cases of foreign materials (1972–1997) found that 56 percent of objects 1–6 mm in size might pose a limited acute hazard. For objects greater than 6 mm, only 2.9 percent were judged to present no hazard.

 

 

 

The above perhaps justifies a little more detail.

 

Here is a statement of the Scope of the potential US Legal Consequences -

 

Attached File  FDA - Adulteration involving hard or sharp foreign objects.pdf   290.92KB   16 downloads


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C





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