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PP Film Quality Evaluation


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agwanda

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Posted 24 June 2011 - 01:58 PM

Dear All,

I would like to know how to go about evaluation of PP Film(commonly pouch film) for physical characteristics. What do I need to look for and how do I go about it?

Please help.

Agwanda


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Foodworker

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Posted 24 June 2011 - 03:17 PM

Are you making PP pouches or using them to pack food - any testing regime should be structured initially around your needs and the functionality of the material.



agwanda

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Posted 24 June 2011 - 03:27 PM

Dear FW,

We are using PP pouches for packaging( liquid foods) mainly dairy products.

Agwanda

Are you making PP pouches or using them to pack food - any testing regime should be structured initially around your needs and the functionality of the material.


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Gourav

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Posted 25 June 2011 - 07:56 AM

Dear FW,

We are using PP pouches for packaging( liquid foods) mainly dairy products.

Agwanda




I believe following should be checked: -
1. Thickness of the film - as you might have specified to the supplier; your shelf life would depend on it.
2. Machinability - Just to ascertain - You are able to use it on your packing machines
3. Sealing strength
4. Food Grade - Virgin PP


Foodworker

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Posted 01 July 2011 - 09:24 AM

Good Morning Agwanda,

Apologies for not adding a response sooner but I have been working out of the country, including ironically, Nairobi.

As I said earlier, the testing regime should be structured around your needs.

Also, as a food packer, you are probably not set up for any in depth testing and you have the right to expect your supplier to test as needed and provide you with a consistently quality product. Make sure that you have evidence of competence of your supplier - BRC/IoP certification, audit, questionnaire etc.

Most of your requirements should be stated to you in a Certificate or Declaration of Compliance. Depending upon where you sell you products, the Certificate/Decalaration sould include as a minimum confirmation that the material meets the relevant country food contact legislation, paricularly any migration data.

You may have some basic needs for QC checking - as said elsewhere thickness is a simple test which you can do yourself, but also a visual check to make sure that any print is correct and legible is very important.

I am guessing that you are using BOPP, but you may be using a laminate barrier for a gas flush or water barrier. This may require some other data from your supplier. For BOPP you can do some simple manual checks such as puncture resistance and machine/cross direction stretch.

Some of your customers may require periodic microbiological testing but I wouldn't start a complex programme for this as it is very unlikely you will ever have problem wth the film and you will probably have a sterilisation system on your line.

Functional testing will normally require specialist equipment heat seal, coefficient of friction, tensile strength etc. Again the requirement for these depends upon your application. Manual packing for example will mean that a coefficient of friction is irrelevant.

Some parameters are better checked on line such as heat seal strength. It is only when you have a problem that any tests will be needed. Get your supplier in and show them your equipment and processes so that they know how you will use their products and agree any visual or subjective parameters.

In summary, I would just say look at your needs, any history of problems, but don't get too complicated.

Sorry - ignore the bit about gas flushing, I forgot that you were packing liquid.


Edited by Foodworker, 01 July 2011 - 09:29 AM.





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