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Biocide for sanitizing incoming product - please share experience?

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kajumom

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Posted 06 July 2011 - 05:12 PM

We were reciently approached form a processor of ours that they use 'Biocide', a product involving peroxide & pericedic acid, applied in water, as a bath or spray @ 90ppm to sanitize incoming product. It is used for them as a 'kill step' in their attempt to have a 'log 5' reduction in risk. They say it is more high-tech and impresses FDA more than what we use as a chlorine spray over our product. We could look into adding this to our fruit water/washer tanks but I am hesitant and know nothing about this option. I have heard of others using a fog tunnel but that is a more expensive approach. When this business was inundated by the FDA b/c of a possible outbreak/recall they said it stopped the investigation in their tracks when they said every item was sprayed with this product as a kill step.

What do you all know about using this as a 'kill step'? is it necessary? Desired in the industry? Looked well upon or???



GMO

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Posted 06 July 2011 - 07:03 PM

If you have a high care / high risk area, all ingredients possible to do so should be sprayed with a disinfectant. Now whether you use chlorine or a biocide, I suspect both would work. As for the veg washing; the biocide may be worth a look (or rather one with an organic acid element.) I have heard of organic (ie not mineral) acids having a decent ability to kill pathogens whereas I think chlorine in veg washers tends to only kill pathogens in the water rather than on the surface.



VicCherikoff

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Posted 07 July 2011 - 10:29 AM

We were reciently approached form a processor of ours that they use 'Biocide', a product involving peroxide & pericedic acid, applied in water, as a bath or spray @ 90ppm to sanitize incoming product. It is used for them as a 'kill step' in their attempt to have a 'log 5' reduction in risk. They say it is more high-tech and impresses FDA more than what we use as a chlorine spray over our product. We could look into adding this to our fruit water/washer tanks but I am hesitant and know nothing about this option. I have heard of others using a fog tunnel but that is a more expensive approach. When this business was inundated by the FDA b/c of a possible outbreak/recall they said it stopped the investigation in their tracks when they said every item was sprayed with this product as a kill step.

What do you all know about using this as a 'kill step'? is it necessary? Desired in the industry? Looked well upon or???


I have a natural antimicrobial which is more effective than Tsunami and similar biocides, able to drop the microbial load 7-log with an instantaneous dip and drain. It is called Herbal-Active and it made from culinary herb extracts and is self-affirmed GRAS. It is actually used IN foods and flavors and is classed as 'natural flavors'.

The benefits, apart from its benign nature for workers (mix peracetic and chlorinated water and toxic gaseous free chlorine can be released) is its broad spectrum action against all bacteria, yeasts and moulds. It doesn't need to be rinsed off the produce (saving water) and significantly extends the shelf life of fresh produce from 2 - 4 times (berries and soft fruits) to 10 times or more (zucchini and cucumbers).

It is currently used in New Zealand as a dipping solution for jerky and herbs for pesto manufacture; in Singapore and the UK for organic vegetables for juicing; in Australia for high antioxidant fruits which are pureed, blended and on-sold to a nutritional juice company without pasteurization; and these are just a few applications.

A system recommended for processing tomatoes for enhanced food safety and extended shelf life is to clean water wash the tomatoes as a first step. Conveyor the fruits out of the bath, air-blowing (optional) excess water from the surface. Pass the tomatoes under a spray of 1% Herbal-Active recycling the solution repeatedly. Monitor the strength of the solution with a refractometer keeping the Brix reading at 1 degree topping up with fresh 5% solution as needed.

The net cost is insignificant per kg of processed produce which can also be promoted as "Process-preservative free, long life, naturally sanitized for your safety".

The product will work on fruits, vegetables, salad greens, herbs, sprouts, meats, poultry, seafood and flowers (also a good addition to vase water). It can be used as a surface cleaner and has a slight aromatic profile which disappears rapidly with no residue or after-note.

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Posted 07 July 2011 - 03:10 PM

Hello,
I had used a Biocide called Parasan 15% for the last 6 years. I have to say not only does a great job controlling/killing pathogens but it also helps with the shelf life and as a post harvest fungicide. I really like it and very efficient, I use it at 80ppm. On the safety side just follow the label recommendations and you should be fine.



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Posted 07 July 2011 - 03:40 PM

Hi RGQ, can i have some info on Parasan 15% please, just had quick look on internet with no luck. we wash and hydro cool potatoes and use chlorine in the water and then give a final rinse with potable water. if we used something like the Parasan, would it not just be washed off at the end?
Looking forward to your reply!



Antores

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Posted 08 July 2011 - 06:40 PM

Hi RGQ, can i have some info on Parasan 15% please, just had quick look on internet with no luck. we wash and hydro cool potatoes and use chlorine in the water and then give a final rinse with potable water. if we used something like the Parasan, would it not just be washed off at the end?
Looking forward to your reply!


Hello,

Perasan A and Biosode are just brands, and I think in USA both are manufactured or distributed by Meyer Labs. There is other similar product called Storox. Please be aware than Perasan and Biocide are just commercial brands for chemicals composed mostly of Peroxyacetic (or Peracetic) Acid and Hydrogen Peroxide. The formulas and concentrations change some, but I’ll argue that the results are much different.

In USA, Peracetic acid does not need to be rinsed when applied at 80 PPM, but you will need to check the pesticide limits pr Peracetic acid and Hydrogen Peroxide in your country.

Here is some info on those products.

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Antores

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Posted 08 July 2011 - 07:07 PM

Hello Kajumon,

I have used Perasan and of course, also chlorine. They both have advantages and disadvantages as everything. Chlorine of course is inexpensive and effective, but need to be used at correct PH so an acid should be added to the water (in wash tanks) to maintain proper pH. Peracetic acid is not pH dependent and can be used in waters with more organic loads, it cost a little more but as per my experience, has better log reduction. Also, Peracetic acid is very strong and corrosive when concentrated, resulting in higher worker risk for the employees, but since the dilution rate is lower than chlorine, once diluted it is actually less corrosive for the equipment than chlorine. (be sure to used pumps for acid)

You are going to have a lot of questions when selecting a chemical for controlling bacteria in wash water. Here is my advice:

· Do not see this step as a “killing Step”: Regardless of the chemical, the ability of killing bacteria in the surface of the produce if not a proven fact, it may reduce it but not eliminate it. The sanitizer will kill bacteria IN the water controlling possible cross contamination.

· Do not decide based on what the salesperson tells you: They all have the best product and will tell you how it is approved by USDA, FDA and used by NASA. You may search for scientific studies on that specific sanitizer for your specific product and see what you find. If you are lucky enough to find one, you can use that paper as validation in most cases.

· Make your own test (validation): This is the most important!! What may work for some, may not work for you. All plants are different in product, equipment, process, water quality, etc. Inform the sales person that you are going to make a validation, buy few product (55 gallon drum or less) and run some tests. What I normally do is send produce samples before going thru the wash and after the wash to a lab to be tested for APC (Aerobic Plate Count). That way you can see the actual reduction in bacteria count with each sanitizer for your specific product, equipment and process. Do this first with the product you are currently using, that way you can compare. An finally, while doing this take some numbers on the COST as well, how much sanitizer per gallon or per hour (however you can measure it) is used and what is the cost. That way you can do a cost/benefit analysis.

Hope this help. Good Luck!



Madam A. D-tor

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Posted 09 July 2011 - 06:08 AM

Dear all,

This topic is a real shock to me!
Are you all saying, that you spray your raw products or wash it with chlorine, peroxide or another disinfectant?
Is it legal?

It is not allowed here. I have heard that it is sometimes done in the US, but I was not aware it is also applied in UK.

would you say it is common business where you live?

Are there no food safety hazards in overdosing or not rinsing afterwards?
How is the process audited? Do you monitor and record the concentration?

Well, maybe these questions area bit rare, but this whole think is new to me. I like to know more.


Kind Regards,

Madam A. D-tor

Antores

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Posted 11 July 2011 - 04:00 PM

Dear all,

This topic is a real shock to me!
Are you all saying, that you spray your raw products or wash it with chlorine, peroxide or another disinfectant?
Is it legal?

It is not allowed here. I have heard that it is sometimes done in the US, but I was not aware it is also applied in UK.

would you say it is common business where you live?

Are there no food safety hazards in overdosing or not rinsing afterwards?
How is the process audited? Do you monitor and record the concentration?

Well, maybe these questions area bit rare, but this whole think is new to me. I like to know more.


Yes, the use of chlorine to control bacteria load in wash water for produce is legal in USA. Other sanitizers such as the Perasan discussed here may contain Peracetic acid and Hydrogen Peroxide. These sanitizers are considered “Pesticides” (since are used to kill organisms) and must be registered with the US EPA (Environmental Protection Agency). There are also detection (or residue) limits for all pesticides.

In the case of Chlorine (Sodium or Calcium Hypochlorite), I would say EPA has determined that the benefits way overweight any risks. Here you can see a complete report of the risk assessment and the decision document from EPA.

http://www.epa.gov/oppsrrd1/REDs/old_reds/case0029.pdf

With this said:

· Would you say it is common business where you live?
Yes; it is common business. I would say chlorine is the most used because their effectiveness and low cost.


· Are there no food safety hazards in overdosing or not rinsing afterwards?

As explained before, there are residue limits, and this is commonly reached by applying the right concentration in water. In the case of chlorine, the concentration is so low (about 100 PPM) that you cannot even smell it in the water.

· How is the process audited? Do you monitor and record the concentration?

Yes. The concentration shall be monitored and it is one of the critical parts of most audits. Records shall be maintained demonstrating that concentration monitored and control. You don’t want of course more or less that the required concentrations. Many operations are now using automatic systems, such as ORP (Oxygen Reduction Potential) to maintain right concentrations.



As this may be shocking for you, If you cannot use this sanitizers, what do you use in the Netherlands?



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Madam A. D-tor

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Posted 11 July 2011 - 07:09 PM

As this may be shocking for you, If you cannot use this sanitizers, what do you use in the Netherlands?



Dear Antores,

Thanks for the clear explanation.



As far as I know, only cold water is used here.



I also think that the shelf life might be shorter.


Kind Regards,

Madam A. D-tor

Charles.C

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Posted 11 July 2011 - 09:36 PM

Dear All,

It is a fact that some countries (including I believe the Netherlands :smile: ) prohibit the use of compounds such as discussed in this thread either internally or for imports of vegetables / fruit.

I did a partial literature study of this area 1 year ago while investigating the use of ISO 22000 for post-harvest processing of these products. Virtually all the journals / text books I found sort of agreed with Antores that most routine "sanitisers" are simply incapable of commercially achieving reductions so as to be able to call the process "elimination" (I think the basic "sanitiser" requirement was minimum 5D performance standard). Typical figures (mostly chlorine - based) were generally in the (1 - 3) log range.

In fact, I would imagine that if anyone could validate a widely applicable and "approvable" safe / not highly expensive chemical which could deliver such results as above, a large fortune awaits. :smile: Currently, the consensus seemed to be that pre-harvesing control is the only reliable solution for packed, safe fresh-cut produce. However i would certainly like to see some links demonstrating opposite opinions in practical use.

Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C




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