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easyaspie

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 07:59 PM

Hi all!

I would like to be very honest with you and tell you that I do not work in the Food Industry; in fact I work for a company that produces food grade lubricants!

However it is not lubricants which I would like to ask you about, today I have another interest -

How do you mark lines in your production facilities and your warehouses? (probably not the most glamorous question you have ever been asked!)

  • What method is used for marking lines in your factory?
    There are none? Tapes? Hand-painted? Aerosol painted? other?
  • Is there a rules and regulations which must be adhered to when line marking?
    BRC? Supermarket? There are no rules? Generic food industry rules that everybody knows? other?
  • From a food safety perspective, what are the most important things that you feel must be considered when line marking?
  • What zones are generally marked with lines? What colours are used?
    i.e. blue is used to designate an area where water can be drunk
If you have time and the willpower to answer my questions, I hope that I can return the favour in future.

Many thanks for your efforts :)

Easyaspie


shea quay

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 09:43 PM

No easy answer, I'm afraid - as you've probably guessed!
Obviously, there's nothing better than physical barriers. In the absence of such barriers, I've used warehouse tape - we've never had a customer complaint, but I can see the foreign body risk as it has worn down. Permanent paint will be, well, permanent, and you're warehousing needs may change with time. I don't honestly know how legal it is, but with my farming backround, I've found sheep marking paint to be quite effective in the short term and it fades with time. However, you may have to risk assess this, depending on the type of food grade grease you manufacture - i.e. is the marker used nut free? This topic may help, Charles' comments certainly helped me.....
http://www.ifsqn.com...-to-production/
Auditor's are quite flexible once you have dedicated areas, and they sure do love colour coding- there are no dedicated colours - we have a primarily Eastern European workforce, so it's an honour to work in a "red" or "blue" area, and an insult to work in a "green" or "orange" area. I'm personally waving the white flag!



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GMO

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 05:19 AM

Physical barriers as the PP said, otherwise tape is a poor second. If you do use tape you must ensure it doesn't become a foreign body hazard and this should be part of your GMP audit to check.



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easyaspie

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 08:26 AM

No easy answer, I'm afraid - as you've probably guessed!
Obviously, there's nothing better than physical barriers. In the absence of such barriers, I've used warehouse tape - we've never had a customer complaint, but I can see the foreign body risk as it has worn down. Permanent paint will be, well, permanent, and you're warehousing needs may change with time. I don't honestly know how legal it is, but with my farming backround, I've found sheep marking paint to be quite effective in the short term and it fades with time. However, you may have to risk assess this, depending on the type of food grade grease you manufacture - i.e. is the marker used nut free? This topic may help, Charles' comments certainly helped me.....
http://www.ifsqn.com...-to-production/
Auditor's are quite flexible once you have dedicated areas, and they sure do love colour coding- there are no dedicated colours - we have a primarily Eastern European workforce, so it's an honour to work in a "red" or "blue" area, and an insult to work in a "green" or "orange" area. I'm personally waving the white flag!


Thank you!

No definitely not an easy answer!

For my own interest, why is it an honour to work in red or blue areas / insult in a green or orange area?

Does anybody know of any documents which show what "zones" should be defined for audit purposes?


Cheers!


shea quay

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 08:44 AM

Colours of the Polish/Slovak flags vs colours of the Irish flag - racial integration at its best here, I'm afraid!

There are no "set in stone" laws to colour coding - it's just what works for you. There are some recommendations such as red for meat, yellow for chicken, blue for fish, but these also give white for bread which would, in my opinion, be an awful idea as bread actually is white. This link might give you an idea..
http://www.hillbrush...aning-equipment



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Natalia86

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 09:26 AM

There are no "set in stone" laws to colour coding - it's just what works for you.


Yes, I agree. You have to choose the system which will match to you. The high care zones shall be separated (the best method is to use the physical barriers and special signs on tha walls, floors, etc.). The system shall be visible and readable for all employees, so all signs and warnings shall be presented in a universal form (images, proceded by a verbal instructions, etc.).


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easyaspie

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 11:19 AM

Colours of the Polish/Slovak flags vs colours of the Irish flag - racial integration at its best here, I'm afraid!

There are no "set in stone" laws to colour coding - it's just what works for you. There are some recommendations such as red for meat, yellow for chicken, blue for fish, but these also give white for bread which would, in my opinion, be an awful idea as bread actually is white. This link might give you an idea..
http://www.hillbrush...aning-equipment


Very interesting fact about racial integration...!

Thanks for the HACCP and colour coding link - very useful.


Looking less specifically at food processing areas, and more at other general markings such as:

Walkways
Waste removal routes
Routes for transportation of allergens
Drainage
Quarantine zones
Designated areas for pallets
Zebra crossings etc.
Warnings (e.g for physical hazards)
Areas that are ok for drinking
Areas that are ok for eating
Highlighting safety equipment e.g. fire extinguishers

How are these identified and marked?

Regards,


DocGra

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 08:29 PM

Hello Mr aspie,

We painted lines on our floor to segregate the changing area in high care (shoes / wellies not ladies / gentelmen!). It lasted just long enough for folks to remember where it was. Apparently we scoured the floor so well during deep clean sessions that the paint wore off.

Believe it or not - no one crosses the now 'virtual' line in the wrong shoes!

Now what do you think about out standards of training!

Everywhere else I've been uses physical, usually stainless steel barriers that you can sit on to help change your shoes - I visited one site that had heated stainless steel swing-overs that were very welcome on a winter's morning!


Happy taping ...

Cheers,

Graham



zue_rais

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 12:42 PM

What method is used for marking lines in your factory?
Tapes?

Is there a rules and regulations which must be adhered to

Generic food industry rules that everybody knowsFrom a food safety perspective, what are the most important things that you feel must be considered when line marking? defined space

What zones are generally marked with lines? What colours are used?
colour-coded i.e. blue is used to designate an area where water can be drunk







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