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Production and Quality Control of Pregelatinized Flour?


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#1 Georgias

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Posted 25 October 2012 - 09:08 AM

Hello

I'm new member and working to a mill industry. Recently we had a request from one of our clients about a preger flour. I need any help about it as its the first time i met it.
What about pregel flour? Does it needs a specific industrial equipment for its production and which are they? Need to use a specific wheat? And also which is the main parameter need to be on control and with which lab instrument?

Thank you in advance



#2 Hongyun

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Posted 25 October 2012 - 09:59 AM

Hi Georgias,

I believe it works the same way as pregelatinized starch.

What happens is that they cook the starch until they gelatinize, then they dry the paste into powder, so that the end user needs only to add room temperature water to get thick viscosity without having to cook the starch again.

Hope the above helps. And welcome to the forum.
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#3 Georgias

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Posted 25 October 2012 - 11:00 AM

Thank you Hongyun,

I also supposed so, but tell me if you know the most important parameter is the viscosity to the final product? And should we buy a viscometer or can we have a reliable result by amylograph? And which are the limits?
Hi Georgias,

I believe it works the same way as pregelatinized starch.

What happens is that they cook the starch until they gelatinize, then they dry the paste into powder, so that the end user needs only to add room temperature water to get thick viscosity without having to cook the starch again.

Hope the above helps. And welcome to the forum.
:welcome:
[/quote]



#4 Hongyun

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Posted 25 October 2012 - 02:26 PM

I'm no expert in the starch field, but I guess a Brookfield Viscometer would be good to check the viscosity. Alternatively, you can also get a Consistometer for fast results.

As for parameters, I found this. You could probably find more of these specs if you check google/yahoo.


Edited by Hongyun, 25 October 2012 - 02:31 PM.


"World Community Grid made it possible for us to analyze in one day the number of specimens that would take approximately 130 years to complete using a traditional computer."

- Dr. David J. Foran, professor and lead researcher at The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School.




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