Jump to content

  • Quick Navigation
Photo

Sanitation in the UK

Share this

  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic
- - - - -

mesophile

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 137 posts
  • 142 thanks
10
Good

  • Wales
    Wales
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Twitter @DSi77

    Chartered Scientist (CSci)
    Member of IFST (MIFST)
    Avid guitar player, dog walker and fitness trainer.
    I love reading, and learning about new fields in food science and technology.

Posted 13 December 2012 - 04:01 PM

Hi All,

Does anyone use the term "sanitation" in the UK? I always thought this was an American/Australian term for cleaning and disinfecting, which is the common wording used in the UK.


i.e. make sure you have a sanitation procedure in place....


Many thanks



Simon



Charles.C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Moderator
  • 20,542 posts
  • 5666 thanks
1,548
Excellent

  • Earth
    Earth
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:SF
    TV
    Movies

Posted 13 December 2012 - 04:32 PM

Dear mesophile,

Yes, multiply. :smile:

(1) if you mean exactly "sanitation procedure" just google - UK "Sanitation procedure"

(2) if general, Does the BBC count ?
http://news.bbc.co.u...lth/8045073.stm

(3) Or did you mean in the official food business ?
(a bit harder i must admit, I think UK texts prefer "hygiene", or both, eg
Attached File  bitespring12 (FSA 2012).pdf   2.61MB   26 downloads (pg 29)

Rgds / Charles.C

PS - a quick google demonstrates, eg wiki, that interpretations / usages of the terms cleaner / disinfectant / sanitizer are globally legion, eg -

wiki - Disinfectants are frequently used in hospitals, dental surgeries, kitchens, and bathrooms to kill infectious organisms.
Perhaps wiki is UK based ?


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


George @ Safefood 360°

    Grade - SIFSQN

  • Corporate Sponsor
  • 374 posts
  • 327 thanks
31
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ireland and USA

Posted 13 December 2012 - 07:40 PM

I think it is much clearer if we speak only of chemicals.

Typically a Detergent is designed to remove food soils and deposits, a Disinfectant is designed to kill microb's and a Sanitiser contains both a Detergent and DIsinfectant. I'm not sure if this convention translates over to the verbs.

the phrase 'sanitation procedure in place' may simply be the language used by the author. i would have used the term 'cleaning' to cover the most appropriate cleaning for the item, area etc. That may be a detergent step or disinfection. Sanitization may be a discription for both these steps whether conducted separately or in combination



KTD

    Grade - SIFSQN

  • IFSQN Senior
  • 266 posts
  • 96 thanks
15
Good

  • United States
    United States

Posted 20 December 2012 - 08:33 PM

George -
I agree with your general definition of detergents. However, with regards to microbial kill, the terms sanitizing, disinfecting, and sterilizing - are generally associated in the US with increasing % kill processing to the right. Products achieving any of the degrees of kill may contain a single or mix of killing chemicals, as well as surfactants, detergents, and/or other chemicals designed to increase the product's efficacy. In the US, products designed to reduce microbial counts must be registered with the US EPA in order to make that claim.

Particularly in US plants regulated by the USDA FSIS (primarily meat & poultry), there is usually a distinction between washing, cleaning, and sanitizing...with sanitizing specifically tied to the use of chemicals to reduce the microbial load.



Charles.C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Moderator
  • 20,542 posts
  • 5666 thanks
1,548
Excellent

  • Earth
    Earth
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:SF
    TV
    Movies

Posted 21 December 2012 - 12:13 AM

Dear All,

The original UK poster never clarified his OP so we shall probably never know the relevantly best answer. :biggrin:

Interesting OT's for the Xmas season though. :smile:
I have little doubt that USA exhibits a variety of definitions of sanitizer (sanitiser ?) etc in view of the segregated responsibilities at work. i seem to remember somewhere that one US definition of sanitizer required proof of at least 5 log reduction (of "something"), presumably not an operational meaning. This approach would seem to be a more precise basic route IMO albeit ignoring conundrums such as -
http://www.law.corne...text/40/180.940

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


mesophile

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 137 posts
  • 142 thanks
10
Good

  • Wales
    Wales
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Twitter @DSi77

    Chartered Scientist (CSci)
    Member of IFST (MIFST)
    Avid guitar player, dog walker and fitness trainer.
    I love reading, and learning about new fields in food science and technology.

Posted 05 February 2013 - 02:14 PM

Hi All,

Sorry been a while since I posted.

I don't really have an operation now, it is for University Students. I just wanted to get the terminology correct so i didn't sound wrong. Whilst working in the industry (for 11 years) it had always been detergents and disinfectants, with sanitisers doing a semi good job at both however I am reading more and more student assignments refering to "sanitising". Wasn't sure whether some new phrase had popped in over the last year or so that I was unaware of.

Kind Regards

Simon



Thanked by 1 Member:


Share this

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users