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Definition of brittle plastics?


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#1 chrisbird616

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 08:05 AM

Hi all

 

I was wondering if anybody could provide guidance on what to include in breakage policies and audits in terms of 'brittle' plastics?

 

We already include items like perspex machine guards and plastic light covers in our factory audits, but as we are in the middle of a review I thought it worth challenging our preconceptions with some outside advice.

 

We store and use a huge amount of plastic packaging in our shop-floor operations, of all types. Some are customer-supplied. We've always excluded plastic components from factory audits, mainly due to the fact it would make the system massively unwieldy but also because we never really considered that they might be 'brittle' plastics before.

 

Any help from more experienced people appreciated!

 

Thanks

Chris



#2 Charles.C

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 05:20 PM

Hi all

 

I was wondering if anybody could provide guidance on what to include in breakage policies and audits in terms of 'brittle' plastics?

 

We already include items like perspex machine guards and plastic light covers in our factory audits, but as we are in the middle of a review I thought it worth challenging our preconceptions with some outside advice.

 

We store and use a huge amount of plastic packaging in our shop-floor operations, of all types. Some are customer-supplied. We've always excluded plastic components from factory audits, mainly due to the fact it would make the system massively unwieldy but also because we never really considered that they might be 'brittle' plastics before.

 

Any help from more experienced people appreciated!

 

Thanks

Chris

Dear chrisbird,

 

Some previous opinions. The AIB download (2nd/3rd threads) is quite readable although getting a bit old (2005).

 

http://www.ifsqn.com...ics/#entry62277

 

http://www.ifsqn.com...tic/#entry33609

 

http://www.ifsqn.com...tic/#entry57694

 

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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#3 chrisbird616

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 05:38 PM

Much thanks, once again!

 

Makes sense to me.



#4 CMHeywood

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 10:17 PM

Brittle plastic would create sharp pieces that could cut a consumer.

 

Therefore, some basic rules of thumb:

Can you stretch the plastic =? not brittle.

Can you fold the plastic =? not brittle.

Can the plastic break into sharp pieces = brittle.

(don't really do it) - Would pieces of the plastic injure you if you chewed on them?

You should evaluate all sources of brittle plastic that could put pieces into your product:  overhead fixtures, machine parts, plastic gauge covers, signs, etc.



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#5 Antores

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 10:21 PM

Basically hard plastic with glass-like properties.  it cracks, breaks or shatters in small pieces or sharp pieces on any size. 



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#6 moskito

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Posted 16 November 2013 - 05:13 PM

Brittle plastic would create sharp pieces that could cut a consumer.

 

Therefore, some basic rules of thumb:

Can you stretch the plastic =? not brittle.

Can you fold the plastic =? not brittle.

Can the plastic break into sharp pieces = brittle.

(don't really do it) - Would pieces of the plastic injure you if you chewed on them?

You should evaluate all sources of brittle plastic that could put pieces into your product:  overhead fixtures, machine parts, plastic gauge covers, signs, etc.

 

 

Please keep in mind that some pastics can become "brittle" or sharp due to hardening processes - e.g. acid in the stomach

 

Rgds

 

moskito



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