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Calculation for Converting Nutritional Facts for different pack sizes


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#1 nitchicsqf

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 08:23 PM

Hello All,

 

I have a question. When regarding nutritional facts: I have he nutritional values for a 100g sample size of a product. I am needing the nutritional facts for a 30g sample size of the same product. Is there a calculation that I can make using the 100g values? or would I need to send this product out for a nutritional analysis?

 

Thxxxx,

 

nitchicsqf



#2 Slab

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 12:08 AM

Hi, nitchicsqf;

 

Is this your finished product and test? Manufacturing differences effect nutritional values (brine soak, additives, cook method, etc.) If not I would recommend an analysis based on your finished results.

 

If this is your results, you don't need an additional test performed based on serving size.  100 gm is a typical baseline with this test for obvious reasons as percentiles work nicely with 100.


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#3 nitchicsqf

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 12:32 AM

Hi, nitchicsqf;

 

Is this your finished product and test? Manufacturing differences effect nutritional values (brine soak, additives, cook method, etc.) If not I would recommend an analysis based on your finished results.

 

If this is your results, you don't need an additional test performed based on serving size.  100 gm is a typical baseline with this test for obvious reasons as percentiles work nicely with 100.

 

Thank you! I assumed that was all to it, but I wanted confirmation.

 

Yes, this is my finished product that we produce here at my facility. We have to send our finished samples out to another lab to have in order to have our analysis' done.



#4 YongYM

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 01:24 AM

Dear nitchicsqf:

 

If you have the result for 100g (whether is from the laboratory test or based on calculation), time the value with 30 (serving size as you mentioned) and then divided by 100. Later, follow the rounding rules according to the US standard.

 

 

 

Regards,

Yong



#5 nitchicsqf

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 01:34 AM

Hi, nitchicsqf;

 

Is this your finished product and test? Manufacturing differences effect nutritional values (brine soak, additives, cook method, etc.) If not I would recommend an analysis based on your finished results.

 

If this is your results, you don't need an additional test performed based on serving size.  100 gm is a typical baseline with this test for obvious reasons as percentiles work nicely with 100.

 

 

Dear nitchicsqf:

 

If you have the result for 100g (whether is from the laboratory test or based on calculation), time the value with 30 (serving size as you mentioned) and then divided by 100. Later, follow the rounding rules according to the US standard.

 

 

 

Regards,

Yong

 

Thanks you all for your help!!!!



#6 Charles.C

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 04:12 AM

Dear nitchicsqf,

 

Might be worth mentioning that a direct computation assumes that the material is homogeneous.

 

Known in the trade as "sampling error". :smile:

 

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C





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