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Citric acid and sodium chloride as a cleaning agent


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#1 mehraj.udct

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 12:15 PM

Hello,

 

I am planning a changeover matrix for our products. We don't have protein and fat in our products hence I need mild cleaner I have two options such as mild acids or alkali's since our product contain low level of citric acid we have plan to use citric acid and sodium chloride in combination for cleaning but i don't know the proportion and concentration of each we can try hence I need your suggestions.

 

Please suggest me what should be the concentration of each for effective cleaning.

 

Thanks



#2 bacon

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 04:43 PM

The wine industry in my area does not use any chlorine based sanitizer (can be a source of the nasty chemical 2,4,6-trichloroanisole, better known as TCA, the compound responsible for the moldy, musty smell in so-called “corked” wines). They do use a brand of Sodium Carbonate Peroxyhydrate, I believe called Sodium Percarbonate (be wary of Sodium carbonate as it does not dissolve easily). I am not sure about the effective contact time but and neutralized quickly by change in pH with a 1% citric acid rinse (then rinsed with water for the wine industry). Very mild and I have only worked with it using my bare hands.

 

Examples in North America of products that contain sodium carbonate and/or sodium percarbonate include: PBW (Powdered Brewery Wash), One Step No-Rinse Cleaner (known as Aseptox in Canada), B-Brite Cleanser, and OxiClean.

 

Give the attached a read. The latter 1/2 in particular.

 

Cheers

-B

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#3 Snookie

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 08:12 PM

Baron is right depending on your product you can residual smell of the chlorine.  In produce they often use sodium chloride buffered by citric acid, but IMHO even at correct dosages you often can get a residual smell.  In that application I prefer the peracytic acid hydrogen peroxide blend. 

 

Even with products that have no fats or proteins that is in a wet environment, I prefer a chlorinated degreaser as the surfactant can be very helpful in the cleaning process.   


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#4 mehraj.udct

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 06:51 AM

Dear snookie,

 

In produce they often use sodium chloridebuffered by citric acid, but IMHO even at correct dosages you often can get a residual smell. 

 

can you please elaborate this.






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