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Thermally processed, low acid food in hermetically sealed containers?


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#1 javy

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 06:44 AM

dear all,

 

good day.

 

Is thermally processed low acid foods packaged in hermetically sealed containers be considered as high risk foods?

 

thanks...

 

javy



#2 Charles.C

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 09:34 AM

dear all,

 

good day.

 

Is thermally processed low acid foods packaged in hermetically sealed containers be considered as high risk foods?

 

thanks...

 

javy

 

Dear javy,

 

Considered by whom ?

 

I presume you are referring to something like (commercially sterile), shelf stable, canned fish ?

 

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#3 Tony-C

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 03:57 PM

Hi Javy,

 

There are different interpretations of the term 'high risk food'

 

University of Warwick - High-risk foods can be defined as “any ready-to-eat food that will support the growth of pathogenic bacteria easily and does not require any further heat treatment or cooking”. These types of foods are more likely to be implicated as vehicles of food poisoning organisms consumed in food poisoning incidents. Such foods are usually high in protein, require strict temperature control and protection from contamination and include:
· cooked meat and poultry such as; beef, pork, ham, lamb, chicken, turkey, duck
· cooked meat products such as; meat pies & pasties, pate, meat stock & gravy, cook-chill meals
· dairy produce such as; milk, cream, artificial cream, custards, products containing unpasteurised milk, ripened soft & moulded cheeses
· egg products such as; cooked eggs, quiche and products containing uncooked or lightly cooked eggs, for example; mayonnaise, mousse, home-made ice cream
· shellfish and other sea-foods such as; mussels, cockles, cooked prawns, raw oysters
· Farinaceous dishes including; cooked rice, pasta, couscous

 

FDA - Draft Methodological Approach to Identifying High-Risk Foods under Section 204(d)(2) of the FSMA

 

FSA - A 'high-risk' product is feed or food that is either a known, or an emerging, risk to public health. This may be due to the presence of contaminants and/or undesirable substances such as aflatoxins, salmonella or pesticides.

 

I would not consider ambient stable processed low acid foods in hermetically sealed containers as 'high risk' unless as above there is a 'known or emerging risk'.

 

Regards,

 

Tony

 



#4 Shyguy77

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 07:19 PM

I work with thermally processed LACF(Vegetables)and we considered to be low risk.



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#5 javy

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 01:38 AM

Dear javy,

 

Considered by whom ?

 

I presume you are referring to something like (commercially sterile), shelf stable, canned fish ?

 

Rgds / Charles.C

sir charles good day,

 

one our buyers based on their standard considered canned tuna process(commercially sterile) a high risk. 

 

thanks,

javy



#6 javy

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 01:40 AM

Hi Javy,

 

There are different interpretations of the term 'high risk food'

 

University of Warwick - High-risk foods can be defined as “any ready-to-eat food that will support the growth of pathogenic bacteria easily and does not require any further heat treatment or cooking”. These types of foods are more likely to be implicated as vehicles of food poisoning organisms consumed in food poisoning incidents. Such foods are usually high in protein, require strict temperature control and protection from contamination and include:
· cooked meat and poultry such as; beef, pork, ham, lamb, chicken, turkey, duck
· cooked meat products such as; meat pies & pasties, pate, meat stock & gravy, cook-chill meals
· dairy produce such as; milk, cream, artificial cream, custards, products containing unpasteurised milk, ripened soft & moulded cheeses
· egg products such as; cooked eggs, quiche and products containing uncooked or lightly cooked eggs, for example; mayonnaise, mousse, home-made ice cream
· shellfish and other sea-foods such as; mussels, cockles, cooked prawns, raw oysters
· Farinaceous dishes including; cooked rice, pasta, couscous

 

FDA - Draft Methodological Approach to Identifying High-Risk Foods under Section 204(d)(2) of the FSMA

 

FSA - A 'high-risk' product is feed or food that is either a known, or an emerging, risk to public health. This may be due to the presence of contaminants and/or undesirable substances such as aflatoxins, salmonella or pesticides.

 

I would not consider ambient stable processed low acid foods in hermetically sealed containers as 'high risk' unless as above there is a 'known or emerging risk'.

 

Regards,

 

Tony

sir  tony,

 

well noted sir.

 

thanks,

javy



#7 Charles.C

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 08:21 PM

sir charles good day,

 

one our buyers based on their standard considered canned tuna process(commercially sterile) a high risk. 

 

thanks,

javy

 

Dear javy,

 

Maybe refer yr buyer to BRC's opinion ? if it's "from" GFSI, it must be good ? :smile:

 

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#8 Tony-C

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 09:02 PM

Dear javy,

 

Maybe refer yr buyer to BRC's opinion ? if it's "from" GFSI, it must be good ? :smile:

 

Rgds / Charles.C

 

The GFSI Guidance is generic and not particularly specific about anything.

 

As an organisation that claims to be heading food safety development throughout the world I can only describe it as disappointing. The scheme owners are the ones that are driving standards forwards IMO. BRC have always been at the forefront of this and now IFS and SQF are upping their game. FSSC may need to come up with their own standard at some stage or strongly influence future ISO 22000/22002 publications.

 

Regards,

 

Tony



#9 Sandima

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 02:09 PM

Dear javy,

 

Considered by whom ?

 

I presume you are referring to something like (commercially sterile), shelf stable, canned fish ?

 

Rgds / Charles.C

Charles is quite correct, it depends on who is considering.  

 

Here (Canada) the CFIA considers LACF high risk because of the potential consequences if the thermal process is not applied properly.  

 

Under BRC certification it is a low risk, I assume because it is sealed and shelf stable, they assume we know how to apply the thermal process and take action if there are deviations.

 

jpredmor says in the US LACF is not high risk.



#10 Chris @ Safefood 360°

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 02:56 PM

Hi Javy, 

 

Here is some additional info from BRC and SQF regarding 'High Risk' food determination: 

 

BRC:

http://www.brcglobal...tml/page1.html 

 

SQF:

http://www.sqfi.com/...gram-Vocab.pdf 

 

<quote>

High Risk Food means a food that has a significant likelihood of causing illness or injury to a consumer if not
properly produced, processed, distributed and/or prepared for consumption, or food deemed high risk by a
customer
or declared high risk by the relevant food regulation.

 

-Chris 



#11 Charles.C

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 03:02 PM

Hi Chris,

 

Maybe it's me/my browser/my old PC  but yr 1st link gave me a 404 and 2nd one said "nothing here" ?

 

Rgds / Charles

 

PS - i recall seeing the quoted SQF definition before and thinking (especially for the italics) this is pure nonsense.  Only my opinion of course. :smile:


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#12 Chris @ Safefood 360°

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 03:17 PM

Thanks for letting me know, Charles. That's odd that both resources aren't working as links, but I was able to replicate the errors so I don't think it is your browser. I'll see if I can fix them shortly!






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