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Metal detection equipment for free falling product?


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#1 gretsch75

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Posted 28 April 2014 - 04:32 PM

Can anyone suggest a good company in the U.S. that sells metal detection equipment for free falling product? Thanks



#2 esquef

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Posted 28 April 2014 - 06:09 PM

Check out these guys:

 

http://www.foodproce...214/?page=print



#3 Shyguy77

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Posted 28 April 2014 - 06:25 PM

You could also try these ones; their site has some video demonstrations as well.

 

 

http://www.eriez.com...ctorsindustrial



#4 Snookie

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Posted 28 April 2014 - 09:05 PM

You might also try this company.  I have not worked with their detectors but was impressed with them when getting a quote.

 

http://www.adsdetection.com/


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#5 chebar

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 03:28 AM

Hi gretsch75,

 

We purchase our free falling unit from ERIEZ as mentioned above. They were able to provide us technical support during fabrication, installation, testing, training and calibration. They were able to give us what we say i.e. can detect a FB of 1.5 mm

 

Just one thing in mind that what you purchased should be verified and validated.

 

Hope this help

 

Thanks

 

Chebar

 

#6 chebar

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 03:28 AM

Hi gretsch75,

 

We purchase our free falling unit from ERIEZ as mentioned above. They were able to provide us technical support during fabrication, installation, testing, training and calibration. They were able to give us what we say i.e. can detect a FB of 1.5 mm

 

Just one thing in mind that what you purchased should be verified and validated.

 

Hope this help

 

Thanks

 

Chebar

 

#7 Tony-C

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 06:52 AM

Can anyone suggest a good company in the U.S. that sells metal detection equipment for free falling product? Thanks

 

A couple of reputable suppliers you can try:

 

Mettler Toldeo

 

Lock Inspection

 

Regards,

 

Tony



#8 AlexHayes

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 04:57 PM

ThermoFisher also has a large variety, and a program where they replace any detector within a maximum of 48h.

 

I have a question to all of you:

 

When you buy a detector 

–how much does accuracy and reliability matter to you?

 

I'm asking because my colleagues and I in Switzerland are considering developing a metal detector that based on an unusual technology which might detect particles down to 0.2mm in size. We would like to know whether this added accuracy is only a "nice to have" or an actual problem. The accuracy of current detectors is definitely fine to take out medical hazards (apart maybe from baby food), but we have been thinking that increased reliability and accuracy might for instance protect production machinery from the smaller parts, minimise recall risks, simplify its use, cost less etc.

 

I would like to find out about the need before sticking a lot of money in a product that does not fulfil a significant need for food processors.

 

 

Thanks a lot!

 

Regards,

-Alex



#9 Snookie

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 06:22 PM

ThermoFisher also has a large variety, and a program where they replace any detector within a maximum of 48h.

 

I have a question to all of you:

 

When you buy a detector 

–how much does accuracy and reliability matter to you?

 

I'm asking because my colleagues and I in Switzerland are considering developing a metal detector that based on an unusual technology which might detect particles down to 0.2mm in size. We would like to know whether this added accuracy is only a "nice to have" or an actual problem. The accuracy of current detectors is definitely fine to take out medical hazards (apart maybe from baby food), but we have been thinking that increased reliability and accuracy might for instance protect production machinery from the smaller parts, minimise recall risks, simplify its use, cost less etc.

 

I would like to find out about the need before sticking a lot of money in a product that does not fulfil a significant need for food processors.

 

 

Thanks a lot!

 

Regards,

-Alex

 

Reliability and accuracy are critical.  A machine that is constantly rejecting for false hits is a danger for several reasons.  Employees don't trust the machine and may ignore a real hit.  False rejects are a real killer for production and can have a big impact on costs.  Then there is the fun of explaining to a customer how a bolt got through the metal detector


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#10 Tony-C

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 07:01 PM

When you buy a detector 

–how much does accuracy and reliability matter to you?

 

I'm asking because my colleagues and I in Switzerland are considering developing a metal detector that based on an unusual technology which might detect particles down to 0.2mm in size. We would like to know whether this added accuracy is only a "nice to have" or an actual problem. The accuracy of current detectors is definitely fine to take out medical hazards (apart maybe from baby food), but we have been thinking that increased reliability and accuracy might for instance protect production machinery from the smaller parts, minimise recall risks, simplify its use, cost less etc.

 

I would like to find out about the need before sticking a lot of money in a product that does not fulfil a significant need for food processors.

 

 

Thanks a lot!

 

Regards,

-Alex

 

Price and Reliability.

 

Accuracy required varies but a minimum standard that I have seen validated in published scientific information is less than 7mm for adult food products. Sounds like a detector more suited to the pharmaceutical industry.

 

This forum is for free falling product and detecting 0.2mm in free fall would be incredible - well done if you can do that!

 

Regards,

 

Tony



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#11 AlexanderHayes

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 09:21 PM

Price and Reliability.

 

Accuracy required varies but a minimum standard that I have seen validated in published scientific information is less than 7mm for adult food products. Sounds like a detector more suited to the pharmaceutical industry.

 

This forum is for free falling product and detecting 0.2mm in free fall would be incredible - well done if you can do that!

 

Regards,

 

Tony

 

Hi Tony, 

 

For us high sample velocities and throughput variations, and therefore free-fall applications, are not expected to be a problem even at 0.2mm accuracy, but we have not yet finished even designing the first prototype. So we can only make predictions based on a prototype of a related technology that we built for the med-tech industry (detecting a bend in medical needles down to a fraction of an angular degree), and some initial calculations. 

 

But if the accuracy of current detectors is already fully sufficient, then we can concentrate our efforts first on building a detector that is more reliable. 

 

Cost: We think there is a good chance that if we get it to work, we can initially price it between $50k and $100k. Do you know what price ranges are currently? (I know a company that buys them for roughly CHF150k, so ca. $166k)

 

Concerning the pharma-industry: Do you happen to know some of the accuracy requirements there?

 

Reliability (For those that are also in the "what is the acceptable Metal size in finished products"-thread, this is a repetition): I did some research and found many factors that cause metal detectors to pass larger fragments than it should, or for instance wires (If oriented a certain way, sensitivity is low). Also, vibrations are generally a large issue, false calibration, change in temperature, too low or high operating temperature, changes in food throughput, metals in the surrounding. Today I spoke with a company in Switzerland that had a detector waste lots of food because it reacted to a metal plate that someone put nearby. Although the largest issue is probably that the inductive coil technology that they operate difficulties not reacting to food. Also, the usual sensors are less sensitive at the center, and towards steel. Yet another problem is that the electronics generally establish a baseline, and in part calibrate themselves, in order to not constantly go off. Unless I understand this wrong, it means that if the line is moving slower than 0.5 m/s, a metal particle may move slow enough to re-set the baseline, meaning this state of contamination becomes "acceptable". 

 

Our sensor would operate on a fully different principle. We could tune out even the most conductive food, so we do not have to employ sophisticated electronics which would be easily thrown off by variations in temperature, speed etc, wich are employed in many current systems to get the most out of the signal. Also, we may shield the sensor from electromagnetic noise of both internal and external origin in the frequency range of interest. The detection would be equally sensitive towards all types of metals, and with a higher precision, even the diameter of a thin wire is sufficient to sort it out. Also, vibrations and objects around the detector should not upset the detection, and the operating temperature range will probably be far larger than current systems, and presumably able to handle unforeseen changes in sample temperature, throughput density, and velocity. 

 

 

 

Cheers,

 

 

 

Alex



#12 Planck

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Posted 16 September 2014 - 12:57 PM

ThermoFisher also has a large variety, and a program where they replace any detector within a maximum of 48h.

 

I have a question to all of you:

 

When you buy a detector 

–how much does accuracy and reliability matter to you?

 

I'm asking because my colleagues and I in Switzerland are considering developing a metal detector that based on an unusual technology which might detect particles down to 0.2mm in size. We would like to know whether this added accuracy is only a "nice to have" or an actual problem. The accuracy of current detectors is definitely fine to take out medical hazards (apart maybe from baby food), but we have been thinking that increased reliability and accuracy might for instance protect production machinery from the smaller parts, minimise recall risks, simplify its use, cost less etc.

 

I would like to find out about the need before sticking a lot of money in a product that does not fulfil a significant need for food processors.

 

 

Thanks a lot!

 

Regards,

-Alex

Dear Alex,

 

hi, you and your colleagues are considering developing a metal detector ? It might detect particles down to 0.2mm in size ?

Really ?

 

I think I can give you a little suggest.

Include only a "nice to have" or an actual problem etc. They are not important.

I am sure there is a market.

And, our individual customer needs it.This is mainly because there is no such an advanced Metal Detector.

I work in a well-known MD company. The position is field technical service .

 

I think the most important thing is capital/money.

 

FYI

 

Thanks .



#13 Planck

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Posted 02 May 2019 - 03:32 PM

Hi, any update??



#14 Planck

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Posted 02 May 2019 - 03:36 PM

ThermoFisher also has a large variety, and a program where they replace any detector within a maximum of 48h.

 

I have a question to all of you:

 

When you buy a detector 

–how much does accuracy and reliability matter to you?

 

I'm asking because my colleagues and I in Switzerland are considering developing a metal detector that based on an unusual technology which might detect particles down to 0.2mm in size. We would like to know whether this added accuracy is only a "nice to have" or an actual problem. The accuracy of current detectors is definitely fine to take out medical hazards (apart maybe from baby food), but we have been thinking that increased reliability and accuracy might for instance protect production machinery from the smaller parts, minimise recall risks, simplify its use, cost less etc.

 

I would like to find out about the need before sticking a lot of money in a product that does not fulfil a significant need for food processors.

 

 

Thanks a lot!

 

Regards,

-Alex

hi, any update ???



#15 christian.stadler

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Posted 06 May 2019 - 12:26 PM


following


Edited by christian.stadler, 06 May 2019 - 12:36 PM.





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