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How are your cleaning & sanitiser stored?


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#1 Marrok

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Posted 20 May 2014 - 12:50 PM

We currently use a cleaner called auto-q and a chlorine based sanitiser called hypo....I think I've gotten that right.
It comes in 200L plastic drums and is pumped diluted (auto q) and in 100 ml measurements (hypo), the drums aren't sealed as hoses feed through the screw cap hole.
By the end (say at least 20L) the liquid has lost colour and most of its potency it would seem.



#2 afend

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Posted 20 May 2014 - 12:56 PM

Have you reached out to the manufacturer to see if this is a common problem? I would start there and ensure all your in-house troubleshooting is being followed: stored in ambient temps, being set up correctly, etc. Hope this helps! 



#3 Marrok

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Posted 20 May 2014 - 01:05 PM

We thought looking at other suppliers might give us a better option and system



#4 Marrok

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Posted 20 May 2014 - 01:08 PM

So I need to look at chemical storage and troubleshoot it



#5 Snookie

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Posted 20 May 2014 - 03:27 PM

You should be able to test your chlorine with strips to find out what the strength is, which should be done anyway to make sure that your chlorine when diluted is not too weak or too strong. 

 

 

So I need to look at chemical storage and troubleshoot it

 

But you should do this as well. 


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#6 RMAV

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Posted 20 May 2014 - 04:20 PM

Test strips to tell you the strength as Snookie said.  When you're troubleshooting, look at your "proportioner" parts to ensure you have the proper ratio of water to concentrate.  Also, chlorine-based cleaners and sanitizers can lose their available chlorine through contamination (galvanized or soft metal placed or falling into the container) or storage conditions (excess light and heat). 

 

Coincidentally, I just had this happen: my chemical supplier installed a new proportioner intake for my chlorine-based sanitizer.  I drew out 5 gallons, noticed the color and smell difference.  A hose clamp he used had partially disintigrated as it was not stainless steel - lost 30 gallons of concentrate.



#7 Marrok

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Posted 20 May 2014 - 04:40 PM

Sounds like I need a proportioned intake, I should be able to seal it for now.
I just got this job so thanks for any advice.
I was having trouble reading the chlorine test strips and just reading about it, it seems 200ppm it strong?
They just made a act position for me but I'm fresh off the fishing boats



#8 Marrok

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Posted 20 May 2014 - 04:41 PM

Qc position...not act position 8/



#9 Ekivlen

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Posted 20 May 2014 - 07:41 PM

The only way you're going to know is by testing. Establish a strength, frequency, template for documentation, the whole nine. Refer to your suppliers, MSDS, and manufacturer's recommendations for everything. 

 

Also, the chemicals you are using should have an established shelf-life. If the particular chemical didn't meet this, you should be able to leverage for a refund.






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