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Methods of Petrifilm Disposal


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#1 Weebus90

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 04:22 PM

HI Everyone, 

Can anyone help me with some different methods used to dispose of Petri Film and other laboratory suppliers?

I am looking for reference material for the autoclave method, 20% bleach solution, etc. 

 

Thanks!



#2 KevinB

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 04:51 PM

You can try Standard Methods for the Examination of Dairy products. Section 2.041 for Autoclaves and 2.0417 for Sterilizing Ovens. 

Hope this helps.

Kevin



#3 Setanta

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 05:23 PM

Our inability to comfortably define how to dispose of used PetriFilm (even using the 3M site) was a factor in our moving to ATP testing.


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#4 dmaissis

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 05:32 PM

http://www.carolina....lm-Coliform.pdf

 

Here is the 3M Coliform Petrifilm procedure; It sites to denature in the bleach solution for an hour or autoclaving according to that specific autoclaves instructions. I am also looking into this so please share any more information if you have it!

 

Thanks!

 

-Danielle



#5 Setanta

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 05:37 PM

Yes, we have no lab or autoclaving facilities....


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#6 Charles.C

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 06:53 PM

Dear All,

 

Autoclaving is a fairly well textboook documented micro.clearance technique i think ?

Never been so keen on the coliform product compared traditional but other P-group members seem autoclave-friendly.

 

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#7 Snookie

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 08:42 PM

I know that these products can be denatured in bleach....but have never been comfortable with it.  I really want to autoclave or not do it. 


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#8 Quality Ben

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 10:42 PM

We autoclave - 121c for 31 minutes.

Use autoclave log strips and tape to verfiy temp (can also data log if equipped).

6 log reduction is what your after.

What do you handle onsite though?? Are you dealing with general micro issues? Listeria / TPC / etc etc?

 

http://en.wikipedia....assurance_level


Edited by Quality Ben, 29 May 2014 - 10:43 PM.


#9 AS NUR

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 12:54 AM

i choose autoclave to desinfect petri film.. use 121oC for 30 Min.


rgds

AS Nur



#10 sdevanti

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Posted 12 December 2017 - 09:36 PM

Hi All,

Do the petrifilms need to be in a biobag or can they sit on the bottom of the autoclave plate?



#11 FurFarmandFork

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 05:23 PM

 

6 log reduction is what your after.

 

6 log reduction is a terrible autoclave "sterilization" standard. A single colony on enriched media will easily be in the tens of millions of organisms. Typically a 12-log reduction is referenced, or a 10^-6 sterilizaton standard, which assumes only one organism on one million items sterilized in the autoclave.

 

Handling of either infectious waste (if you isolate for pathogens with selective petrifilm) or "culture stocks" (non infectious) is regulated at the state level. For example in Oregon:

 

 

333-056-0030
Infectious Waste Treatment

 

(1) Pathological wastes shall be treated by incineration in an incinerator that provides complete combustion of waste to carbonized or mineralized ash. However, if the Department of Environmental Quality determines that incineration is not reasonably available within a wasteshed, pathological wastes may be disposed of in the same manner provided for cultures and stocks.

(2) Cultures, stocks, sharps and biological wastes must be treated using one of the following methods, as delineated in subsections (2)(a), (b) and © of this rule:

(a) Treated via incineration. If incineration is utilized, it shall be done in compliance with all applicable rules established by the Environmental Quality Commission;

(b) Sterilization with saturated steam in a pressurized vessel. If this method is employed, a vessel dedicated to infectious waste treatment must be utilized. Operating procedures which must be developed and implemented shall include at least the following:

(A) Adoption of standard written operating procedures for each steam sterilizer including time, temperature, pressure, type of waste, type of container(s), type of closure on container(s), pattern of loading, and maximum load quantity. The manufacturer's recommendations shall be taken into account;

(B) Methods for monitoring recording or temperature measuring devices during each complete cycle to ensure that the manufacturer's recommended temperature is attained for the recommended amount of time in order to achieve sterilization of the entire load. Temperature measuring devices shall be checked for calibration at least annually;

© Methods for using heat sensitive tape or other device designed to indicate attainment of adequate sterilization conditions, for each container;

(D) Methods for at least monthly use of the biological indicator Bacillus stearothermophilus, or equivalent, placed at the center of a load processed under standard operating conditions, to confirm the attainment of adequate sterilization conditions;

(E) Methods for maintenance of records pertaining to paragraphs (2)(a)(A), (B) and (D) of this rule. These records shall be maintained and available for Division review for a period of not less than one year.

© Treated by other methods that meet the following criteria:

(A) The specific processes of the method have been tested under the conditions in which the method would be used in Oregon for the treatment of infectious waste. Such testing has demonstrated that the method is effective in rendering infectious agents non-infectious by showing bactericidal efficacy against at least spore-forming bacteria and a Mycobacterium. The testing methodology, test results, and documentation thereof must be considered scientifically valid by the Division. The determination of validity requires, but is not limited to:

(i) The testing methodology follows basic scientific principles or objectivity and is fully documented;

(ii) The results of the testing are fully documented. Raw data are made available to the Division if they are requested by the Division;

(iii) The testing has been done by a scientist(s) with an advanced degree in microbiology and with a record of having published scientific research results in a peer reviewed journal;

(iv) The report of the testing methodology and results, together with the statement "This report is an accurate and complete account of the test methods I performed and the test results I obtained" have been signed by the scientist(s) who performed the testing; and

(B) Any discharges into air or water and any solid waste resulting from the method meet the requirements of the laws and administrative rules of the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality; or

© The Environmental Quality Commission has approved the method and has accepted that method by administrative rule.

(3) Liquid or soluble semi-solid biological wastes may be discharged into a sewage treatment system that provides secondary treatment of waste.

(4) After treatment approved by the Division or the Environmental Quality Commission, sharps may be disposed of directly into a permitted land disposal site only if the sharps are in a red, leak-proof, rigid, puncture-resistant container which is taped closed or tightly lidded to prevent loss of the contents. The containers may not be compacted or otherwise broken before placement in the landfill. They must be placed in a segregated area of the landfill.

(5) Methods of treatment which have not been delineated in this rule or approved by the Division or the Environmental Quality Commission, as applicable, are not permitted.

 

 

Look up your own state regulations and figure out what category your waste fits into, then comply with the law regarding bags, methods, etc.. Also, don't call the local landfill, they have no idea.

 

 

OSU has some good autoclave citations in their personal SOP: http://ehs.oregonsta...veSOP-Waste.pdf


Austin Bouck
Owner/Consultant at Fur, Farm, and Fork.
Consulting for companies needing effective, lean food safety systems and solutions.

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