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#1 chebar

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Posted 15 June 2014 - 02:52 PM

Hi Guys,

 

I had some questions that i know that this forum can help.

 

1. What is culinary steam and where should this kind of steam applied?

2. What are the standards for the culinary steam in white sugar production?

3. What should we look into for validation/verification? Pathogens, foreign bodies or heavy metals?

 

Our process is that the steam produced by our boiler is use for heating the evaporation vessel then the vapor produce from that vessel is the one that is in direct contact with our process material (syrup) before it becomes our product which is white sugar.

 

Thank you for your help.....

 

 

Chebar



#2 Hareesh

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Posted 15 June 2014 - 03:32 PM

Dear Chebar

                    I am not an expert but try these links. http://www.spiraxsar...st-Practice.pdf

http://www.donaldson...ture/054942.pdf


With Best Regards

Harish


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#3 Slab

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Posted 15 June 2014 - 05:51 PM

Dear Chebar

                    I am not an expert but try these links. http://www.spiraxsar...st-Practice.pdf

http://www.donaldson...ture/054942.pdf

 

These are some excellent references. Thank you, Hareesh.

 

I'm also the boiler operator for my company (in addition to being the SQF Practitioner/QA Manager), and we use direct steam injection in our cooking process (a sparger system).  I would assume that CIP/SIP is implied in a steam system dependent on temperature and pressure.  The next question would be what chemicals are used either in boiler water treatment or plant water treatment (softening e.g.).  We do not use a softening process, but dosing of a KOH (potash/potassium hydroxide not approved under Title 21 however) into the make-up tank for feed water. The manufacturer and material is registered with NSF, and we aggressively test both water and product for contaminants. So far so good with both SQF and FDA! So cover your ass and insist on COA's from suppliers/manufacturers and validate the process.

 

I would like to stress that there is a severe lack of both understanding and legislation for steam applications.  Most of the market it would seem in my opinion is a mash of "voodoo" and "witchcraft" in an attempt to sell expensive chemical contracts or unneeded equipment.

 


    


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#4 Charles.C

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 05:53 AM

I'm also the boiler operator for my company (in addition to being the SQF Practitioner/QA Manager)

 

 

Dear Slab,

 

IMEX, this is a rare honour indeed. :king: Although perhaps indicating a worrying lack of machine operatives, or ......?

However i do agree with you that steam generators tend to be viewed as black boxes, invisible to FS in respect to potential contamination sources.

 

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#5 Slab

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 09:36 AM

Dear Slab,

 

IMEX, this is a rare honour indeed. :king: Although perhaps indicating a worrying lack of machine operatives, or ......?

 

 

Rgds / Charles.C

 

Well, I began with the company as a plant supervisor and being formally trained and certified in boiler operations, it's a responsibility that has not been easy to pass along to less qualified persons.  However after the next round of vessel inspections due in September I will adamantly insist on finding a replacement.  ;)

 

 

To assist, chebar to a definitive solution/answer is proving troublesome (for reason previously mentioned). Aside from the attachments, Hareesh has provided, there seems to be very little in the way of legislation, and more in the way of dated technical and scholarly articles about cogeneration and efficiency.  The bottom line will boil (a pun there...  :biggrin: ) down to validating a process method for both quality and safety of finished product.  In my experience that is what auditors will inquire about (as in my Nestle audit in July of last year).


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"Some people freak out when they see small vertebra in their pasta" ~ Chef John


#6 jel

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 04:20 PM

Hi Guys,

 

I had some questions that i know that this forum can help.

 

1. What is culinary steam and where should this kind of steam applied?

2. What are the standards for the culinary steam in white sugar production?

3. What should we look into for validation/verification? Pathogens, foreign bodies or heavy metals?

 

Our process is that the steam produced by our boiler is use for heating the evaporation vessel then the vapor produce from that vessel is the one that is in direct contact with our process material (syrup) before it becomes our product which is white sugar.

 

Thank you for your help.....

 

 

Chebar

Culinary steam:  steam that is suitable for direct injection into food products or direct contact with food products or surfaces that contact foods. To prevent corrosion and fouling, additives are used, which in the case of food, are those authorized in the CFR 173.310 (including the sugar production). What you should look for is that the chemicals used in your boilers are permitted for use as culinary steam





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