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SQF 4.2.13.1 - Master Sanitation Schedule

master sanitation sqf level 2 SSOP template

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#1 PetBone

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Posted 24 September 2014 - 02:41 PM

Good Morning!

 

So I was wondering if someone might be willing to share what information you have on your Master Sanitation Schedule? I am currently working on one and we are gearing that towards obtaining an SQF level 2 certification. I have read the code and I know the points of what needs to be covered. My question is more about where is the industry putting the details (i.e in which document: SSOP, Work Instructions, Sanitation Schedule, etc)?

 

 

4.2.13.1 The methods and responsibility for the cleaning of the pet food handling and processing equipment and environment, storage areas, staff amenities and toilet facilities shall be documented and implemented. Consideration shall be given to:

i. What is to be cleaned;

ii. How it is to be cleaned;

iii. When it is to be cleaned;

iv. Who is responsible for the cleaning;

v. Methods used to confirm the correct concentrations of detergents and sanitizers, and

vi. The responsibility and methods used to verify the effectiveness of the cleaning and sanitation program.

 

 

Anyone that would be willing to share a template on formats you used or have used would certainly be more than appreciated as well.

 

 

 



#2 Mr. Incognito

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Posted 24 September 2014 - 02:54 PM

I typically don't give people forms because I like them to put thought into how they want to organize their sheets... plus I don't want a lawyer to show up and serve me papers in the event someone ever notices where they are from...

 

But what I've seen is work I instructions that detail what needs to be cleaned and what equipment to use, probably referencing a color coded cleaning equipment policy if you have one, and a form that the employees sign off when they clean something.

 

The cleaning form is broke up between dailies and weeklies.  Don't put monthly, bi-annual, or annual items on sheets that are collected weekly.  If you have those items make another form for monthly, bi-annual, and annual items. 


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#3 PetBone

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Posted 24 September 2014 - 03:06 PM

I typically don't give people forms because I like them to put thought into how they want to organize their sheets... plus I don't want a lawyer to show up and serve me papers in the event someone ever notices where they are from...

 

But what I've seen is work I instructions that detail what needs to be cleaned and what equipment to use, probably referencing a color coded cleaning equipment policy if you have one, and a form that the employees sign off when they clean something.

 

The cleaning form is broke up between dailies and weeklies.  Don't put monthly, bi-annual, or annual items on sheets that are collected weekly.  If you have those items make another form for monthly, bi-annual, and annual items. 

 

Understandably so, thus I was looking at an example from only a high level (i.e. template that might show what points you hit on with what document)

 

Here is what I started doing before questioning myself:: I know that I am going to write a detailed SSOP on each task which would outline some of this same information again and I am not a fan of having things written in multiple areas saying the same thing

 

Master Sanitation Schedule

 

 

 

What How When Who Area: Item to be cleaned: Cleaning Method: Tools Used (and, or): When is it to be cleaned: Who is responsible for the cleaning: Raw Material Warehouse Floors Dry Clean Brooms, Vacuum, Dustpan Daily Warehouse Staff

Edited by PetBone, 24 September 2014 - 03:07 PM.


#4 Mr. Incognito

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Posted 24 September 2014 - 03:18 PM

It shouldn't have to be overly detailed:

 

Have a scope: what is being done, by whom, and how often (how often may be "as dictated by the referenced cleaning forms".

 

Have general safety precautions:  Maybe something needs PPE, lockout/tagout, specific training

 

Have equipment and general supplies:  Color coded brushes, vacuum hoses, etc

 

Have the procedure: Brush this, vacuum that, inspect this area, etc.

 

Have associated documents: Color coded equipment policy, form(s) for that area (for example the first floor in my mill we have a weekly cleaning sheet and a monthly cleaning sheet.  The monthly cleaning sheet spans the entire year and stays on the floor while the weekly one I pick up on Monday).

 

On weekly forms you can have the days across the top with the items that need to be cleaned along the left side with boxes for initials.  Underneath all of that we have initials for the millers to perform a spot check of the cleaning.  We have a notes section for what can't be accomplished "Couldn't clean X because of whatever reason" and then we have a record review I sign and date on the bottom.

 

You should have a procedure for every distinct area and you can post them in that area so they are easy to find and initial directly after cleaning.  Each "area" may have one or two (or more) cleaning forms.

 

The simpler you make it the easier it will be for your people to follow it.

 

Then you can make one overall policy/procedure for the Master Cleaning Schedule that references all of the cleaning equipment and all of the area forms.

 

OFC there is about a million ways to make the system... this is just one of them.


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#5 Charles.C

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Posted 24 September 2014 - 03:20 PM

Dear Petbone,

 

Is there some subtle difference between "Sanitation Schedule" and "Master Sanitation schedule" ?

 

If no, there are numerous examples on this forum (although not necessarily SQF), eg

 

http://www.ifsqn.com...ule/#entry36044

 

Rgds / Charles.C

 

PS - and an idea for a MSS is here but it's onnly a sliver of an attachment -

http://www.ifsqn.com...ule/#entry44825


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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#6 Mr. Incognito

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Posted 24 September 2014 - 03:25 PM

Charles I think the "Master" should be the overall policy that directs to all the other ones, if you have that, however when our FSSC auditor asked for the "Master Sanitation Schedule" he wanted to see all of the signoff forms that cleaning was accomplished...

 

So it may be one of those things in food safety that are variable.


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#7 RG3

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Posted 29 September 2014 - 06:54 PM

Dear PetBone,

 

ii-vi are all answered on each SSOP (You may be able to ask your chemical supplier for a template)

 

One the left I have a picture of the equipment, what chemicals to be used and at what concentration, frequency, who is to clean it, PPE's and on the right I have the procedure on how to clean it.

 

One important detail I don't see mentioned yet on this forum is that you need to specify/identify if it's a critical equipment.

 

On the daily sanitation schedule (the one the sanitor actually signs off on) and as well as the master sanitation schedule I also indicate if it's a critical equipment. These lists should satisfy (i). On these lists you can also indicate the frequency.



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#8 Charles.C

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Posted 30 September 2014 - 02:07 PM

Dear PetBone,

 

ii-vi are all answered on each SSOP (You may be able to ask your chemical supplier for a template)

 

One the left I have a picture of the equipment, what chemicals to be used and at what concentration, frequency, who is to clean it, PPE's and on the right I have the procedure on how to clean it.

 

One important detail I don't see mentioned yet on this forum is that you need to specify/identify if it's a critical equipment.

 

On the daily sanitation schedule (the one the sanitor actually signs off on) and as well as the master sanitation schedule I also indicate if it's a critical equipment. These lists should satisfy (i). On these lists you can also indicate the frequency.

 

Dear RG3,

 

IMEX you have a very rare Sanitation SSOP. :smile:

 

What determines whether the equipment is "critical" ?. I don't recall ever seeing this terminology in this context ? Maybe US-centric ?

Rgds / Charles.C

 

PS - after some searching i deduce this term may characterize the  potential of equipment to "vector" cross-contamination, eg

 

http://www.foodsafet...iene-practices/

 

If I understand correctly, how do you proceed to rank different tools in practice ? 

 

Offhand, it appears to some extent equatable to the Zoning status / individual  ease of sanitation / intended usage ?


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#9 RG3

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Posted 30 September 2014 - 03:35 PM

Dear RG3,

 

IMEX you have a very rare Sanitation SSOP. :smile:

 

What determines whether the equipment is "critical" ?. I don't recall ever seeing this terminology in this context ? Maybe US-centric ?

Rgds / Charles.C

 

 

Hi Charles,

 

  I am in complete agreement with you questioning what determines the equipment to be critical. As many of us here know, our documents and programs begin "metamorphosis" and take on different terms, added "US-centric" terminology based on all the different auditors that think they know it all. We try to fit every auditor/customer needs on each document in hopes not to get another non-conformity for the same reason. Some auditors are more eccentric than others in specific areas.

 

I am only passing on what I've been dinged on a non-conformity in the past from an SQF standard audit and I am sharing it here in the forum which is why I think at least one of the reasons this forum was brought to be to begin with.

 

Clause

11.2.13.4 Cleaning and Sanitation

Item

Pre-operational hygiene and sanitation inspections shall be conducted by qualified personnel to ensure food processing areas, product contact

surfaces, equipment, staff amenities and sanitary facilities and other essential areas are clean before the commencement of production.

Primary Response

Minor

Evidence

Critical areas and equipment not identified on the Pre-Operational Daily Inspections for 2013.

 

 Now I did argue that not one equipment should be cleaned any better or worse than the next and that the sanitor should simply be following the SSOP. At that moment the auditor smiled and said, well I can just take 10 points off for this here which was completely not relevant to the case at hand and that's just another argument of terminology though the work was done, but I deter. I was fighting a losing battle.

 

On the same token I got hit this year for not having Critical areas and equipment on my Maintenance Master Schedule. Go figure.

 

 

11.2.9.3 Minor Both critical areas of the facility and equipment not available for review on the maintenance schedule.



#10 fgjuadi

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Posted 30 September 2014 - 07:44 PM

Hi Charles,

 

  I am in complete agreement with you questioning what determines the equipment to be critical. As many of us here know, our documents and programs begin "metamorphosis" and take on different terms, added "US-centric" terminology based on all the different auditors that think they know it all. We try to fit every auditor/customer needs on each document in hopes not to get another non-conformity for the same reason. Some auditors are more eccentric than others in specific areas.

 

I am only passing on what I've been dinged on a non-conformity in the past from an SQF standard audit and I am sharing it here in the forum which is why I think at least one of the reasons this forum was brought to be to begin with.

 

Clause

11.2.13.4 Cleaning and Sanitation

Item

Pre-operational hygiene and sanitation inspections shall be conducted by qualified personnel to ensure food processing areas, product contact

surfaces, equipment, staff amenities and sanitary facilities and other essential areas are clean before the commencement of production.

Primary Response

Minor

Evidence

Critical areas and equipment not identified on the Pre-Operational Daily Inspections for 2013.

 

 Now I did argue that not one equipment should be cleaned any better or worse than the next and that the sanitor should simply be following the SSOP. At that moment the auditor smiled and said, well I can just take 10 points off for this here which was completely not relevant to the case at hand and that's just another argument of terminology though the work was done, but I deter. I was fighting a losing battle.

 

On the same token I got hit this year for not having Critical areas and equipment on my Maintenance Master Schedule. Go figure.

 

 

11.2.9.3 Minor Both critical areas of the facility and equipment not available for review on the maintenance schedule.

Ouch

You'd think anything you check pre-op is critical and the stuff you don't check isn't.

 

That's funny, I've been "interpreting" that in my head to mean that zones/areas are defined in your factory (packaging is critical / high risk etc, warehouse is low risk, etc)


.--. .- -. - ... / --- .--. - .. --- -. .- .-..

#11 Charles.C

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Posted 30 September 2014 - 08:22 PM

Dear RG3,

 

i guess the evaluation validity may relate to whether the word "critical" appears in the standard or in Guidances. If absent then i second the "ouch".

 

This irritant has some similarity to the incessant whining by BRC for risk assessments for everything under the sun.

 

I suspect these techniques are basically just an auditorial tactic, known in football lingo as 'winding-up" one's opponent. :smile:

 

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#12 Charles.C

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Posted 01 October 2014 - 06:31 AM

Dear RG3,

 

I noted this in the July 2014, Module 11 Guidance document –

 

11.2.13  Auditing Guidance

Cleaning and sanitation procedures and schedule shall be reviewed at the initial desk audit. 

Subsequent compliance to this requirement and the supplier cleaning and sanitation procedures shall be

reviewed at each facility audit through observation, review of records, and interviews with operational

staff and cleaning contractors if applicable.  Evidence may include:

•      The facility has an effective and appropriate cleaning program in place;

•      All critical equipment and areas of the facility are covered in the cleaning program;

•      Cleaning methods include what is to be cleaned, how it is to be cleaned, frequency of cleaning

and responsibility for cleaning;

•      The cleaning program includes measures for verification of the effectiveness of sanitation;

•      The cleaning of processing equipment is effective;

•      The cleaning of utensils and protective clothing is effective;

•      The cleaning of buildings, surrounds, and amenities is effective;

•      Cleaning of utensils is carried out in an area separate from processing operations;

•      Racks and areas for storing cleaned utensils are provided and appropriate;

•      Pre-operational inspections are completed to ensure cleanliness;

•      All critical areas of the facility are include in pre-operational inspections;

•      Personnel conducting pre-operational inspections are trained and qualified;

•      A sanitation verification schedule is available;

•      Methods are established for verification of sanitation;

•      Responsibility is established for verification of sanitation;

•      An inventory of purchased chemicals is available and is current;

•      Detergents and sanitizers meet local regulatory requirements;

•      SDS sheets are available for all cleaning chemicals purchased;

 

Note that  SQF consider the Guidance text as “non-binding”, ie the auditor can dump it if another interpretation is preferred.

(BRC  would probably include their customary  “risk-based” tag  so as to similarly avoid  a definitive statement).

 

Anyway, taking the text as is -

It appears SQF have 2 Guidance “criticals” of nominally open interpretation, the 2nd for pre-op purposes.

 

(I dare to suggest that 1st  one is equivalent to “zoning” but only audit receivers will know in practice."

 

Based on above, I can perhaps understand an SQF auditor dinging if no documented respose to "critical"  exists but as to what is an acceptable response –  I guess it’s just another –

 

karen

 

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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#13 mamad123

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Posted 01 October 2014 - 08:51 AM

Good Morning!

 

So I was wondering if someone might be willing to share what information you have on your Master Sanitation Schedule? I am currently working on one and we are gearing that towards obtaining an SQF level 2 certification. I have read the code and I know the points of what needs to be covered. My question is more about where is the industry putting the details (i.e in which document: SSOP, Work Instructions, Sanitation Schedule, etc)?

 

 

4.2.13.1 The methods and responsibility for the cleaning of the pet food handling and processing equipment and environment, storage areas, staff amenities and toilet facilities shall be documented and implemented. Consideration shall be given to:

i. What is to be cleaned;

ii. How it is to be cleaned;

iii. When it is to be cleaned;

iv. Who is responsible for the cleaning;

v. Methods used to confirm the correct concentrations of detergents and sanitizers, and

vi. The responsibility and methods used to verify the effectiveness of the cleaning and sanitation program.

 

 

Anyone that would be willing to share a template on formats you used or have used would certainly be more than appreciated as well.

Hi,

 

I worked once as sanitary QC and every cleaning activity is based on SSOP and Work instruction, make the index priorities in order to determine the frequency of cleaning activity, for instances, I usually put more concern on the surface that has a direct contact with product such as trays, hand, tweezzers, table. thus the cleaning schedule become more frequent for those item. ex: hand should be washed every 1 hour.

 

regards 



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#14 benito

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Posted 01 October 2014 - 10:21 AM

CHECK OUT WHETHER THIS CAN HELP.

 

BENITO,.

Attached Files



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#15 Mr. Incognito

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Posted 01 October 2014 - 11:38 AM

deleted my comment... nothing to see here.


Edited by Mr. Incognito, 01 October 2014 - 11:39 AM.

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#16 Charles.C

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Posted 01 October 2014 - 12:17 PM

CHECK OUT WHETHER THIS CAN HELP.

 

BENITO,.

 

thks for the program,

 

I presume you have a separate listing of concentrations used, preparation of solutions etc. ? IMEX, it's helpful to cross-reference these to the method where the respective chemical is used.

 

I don't see any mention of sanitizers ?

 

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#17 benito

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Posted 01 October 2014 - 12:55 PM

thanx a lot i had not seen that but will make changes and include sanitizers.

 

Regards,

BENITO.



#18 RG3

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Posted 01 October 2014 - 04:22 PM

Dear RG3,

 

staff and cleaning contractors if applicable.  Evidence may include:

•      The facility has an effective and appropriate cleaning program in place;

•      All critical equipment and areas of the facility are covered in the cleaning program;

•      Cleaning methods include what is to be cleaned, how it is to be cleaned, frequency of cleaning

and responsibility for cleaning;

•      The cleaning program includes measures for verification of the effectiveness of sanitation;

•      The cleaning of processing equipment is effective;

•      The cleaning of utensils and protective clothing is effective;

•      The cleaning of buildings, surrounds, and amenities is effective;

•      Cleaning of utensils is carried out in an area separate from processing operations;

•      Racks and areas for storing cleaned utensils are provided and appropriate;

•      Pre-operational inspections are completed to ensure cleanliness;

•      All critical areas of the facility are include in pre-operational inspections;

• 

 

karen

 

Rgds / Charles.C

OUCH indeed Magenta_Majors and Charles.C

 

It doesn't mention it at all in the standard, but as Charles in Charge is pointing out I guess its in the guidance (double checked yes it spelled out in the guidance). Here's the kicker, critical equipment and critical areas are defined in my policy and on my sanitation master cleaning schedule but the auditor said it needed to be on the daily sanitation sign off sheet so they know when they sign off that they're cleaning a critical piece of equipment. I did one of these :doh:  R U Serious?!?

 

 defined in your factory (packaging is critical / high risk etc, warehouse is low risk, etc)

YES!!!

 

By the way Charles isn't there a HUGE difference between may and shall???



#19 Charles.C

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Posted 04 October 2014 - 04:53 AM

Dear RG3,
 

 

By the way Charles isn't there a HUGE difference between may and shall???

 

Don't forget that, last time i checked, the SQF standard has a routine disclaimer that no statement in their Guidance is binding and that the original text supercedes in case of ..... It used to be in small type somewhere at the bottom of one of the opening pages. :smile:

 

I totally agree that some auditorial comments can be peculiar, to put it mildly. I, and probably everyone on this forum, have had debates with auditors as to the illogicality of their interpretations of ambiguous text.

 

Unless it's a real key "ding", eg borderline Grading, sometimes the "if you can't beat them ....." philosophy is less taxing, even when you know you're right.

 

From the reverse POV, in an inspectorial role, i can still recall politely informing a Factory Manager that his shipment of X thousand cans of sardines was unacceptable due to many faulty cans. At the same time, i noticed that the main access doors were slowly closing around us. Scary stuff. :smile:

 

Rgds / Charles.C

 

 


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#20 gagansaini1

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Posted 04 May 2015 - 07:50 PM

thanks a lot for the template...Great help







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