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EU regulation 1169/2011


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#1 sama

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Posted 03 November 2014 - 10:25 AM

we are fresh tuna manufacturers and do we need to indicate histamine as allergen in label



#2 Jelena C

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Posted 03 November 2014 - 03:48 PM

It is preferably to write something like: "Histamine susceptible fish"



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#3 RG3

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Posted 03 November 2014 - 04:00 PM

Sama,

  

   It depends if Sri Lanka (Origin) considers Histamine an allergen and/or it depends if the person you are transporting(DC)/exporting(country) it to considers Histamine as an allergen. If either A or B are true then you MUST label Histamine as an allergen.



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#4 Mike Green

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Posted 03 November 2014 - 04:06 PM

(Added later)

Apologies- I have just realised that the OP was asking an allergen question! (i should read properley before posting!!)

 

Histamine is not an allergen it is a toxin that causes allergen like symptoms-the difference is that elevated levels of histamine will affect everyone rather than just 'sensitive individuals'-therefore the answer to should histamine be included in allergen labelling is no!

 

As far as I am aware all tuna bound for the EU must be tested for histamine -- for example....see document  from Irish Fisheries Board

 

I am guessing that the limits that they have chosen would represent a 'safe level' (ie less than 100-200ppm) of histamine..... and if it is exceeded-then it wouldn't be allowed anyway?

 

 

Nine samples to be taken, of which: 

the average histamine content must be 
100mg/kg or less; 
no more than 2 samples may have levels 
between 100mg and 200mg/kg; and 
no sample may have a level above 
200mg/kg. 

 Kind Regards

 

Mike


Edited by Mike Green, 03 November 2014 - 06:10 PM.

I may sound like a complete idiot...but actually there are a couple of bits missing

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#5 Snookie

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Posted 03 November 2014 - 09:29 PM

If I remember my fishery stuff and that is a big IF,  as I recall histamine is part of the death process and bacteria.  So the temperature has to be controlled immediately and thereafter so the bacteria that aids in the histamine process is not present. So if histamine is present, it means the fish has been subjected to temperature abuse. 


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#6 trubertq

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Posted 03 November 2014 - 10:49 PM

If I remember my fishery stuff and that is a big IF,  as I recall histamine is part of the death process and bacteria.  So the temperature has to be controlled immediately and thereafter so the bacteria that aids in the histamine process is not present. So if histamine is present, it means the fish has been subjected to temperature abuse. 

You're absolutely right Snookie.... the presence of histamine is as much an indication of freshness as it is anything else.

 

I'll need to do a bit of research about the labelling with my pelagic clients and come back to you Sama.


I'm entitled to my opinion, even a stopped clock is right twice a day

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#7 sama

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Posted 04 November 2014 - 03:54 AM

(Added later)

Apologies- I have just realised that the OP was asking an allergen question! (i should read properley before posting!!)

 

Histamine is not an allergen it is a toxin that causes allergen like symptoms-the difference is that elevated levels of histamine will affect everyone rather than just 'sensitive individuals'-therefore the answer to should histamine be included in allergen labelling is no!

 

As far as I am aware all tuna bound for the EU must be tested for histamine -- for example....see document  from Irish Fisheries Board

 

I am guessing that the limits that they have chosen would represent a 'safe level' (ie less than 100-200ppm) of histamine..... and if it is exceeded-then it wouldn't be allowed anyway?

 

 Kind Regards

 

Mike

Thank you very much.It realy helps me.....



#8 Avila

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Posted 04 November 2014 - 05:07 AM

Please refer to http://www.fda.gov/d.../UCM251970.pdf chapter 7, related to Scombrotoxin (histamine)

We have to declare Fish (not histamine) in label as some consumer may have hypersensitivity to fish ( http://www.kidswithf...espre.php?id=50 )


Edited by avila muncar, 04 November 2014 - 06:24 AM.


#9 denszabo

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Posted 06 November 2014 - 08:31 PM

Histamine is not an allergen and therefore it should not be declared on the label. you can find a list of allergens which, according to EU 1169/2011 must be declared on Annex II of the regulation.

http://eur-lex.europ...11R1169&from=EN

 



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#10 Snookie

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Posted 06 November 2014 - 08:35 PM

Histamine is not an allergen and therefore it should not be declared on the label. you can find a list of allergens which, according to EU 1169/2011 must be declared on Annex II of the regulation.

http://eur-lex.europ...11R1169&from=EN

 

 

:welcome:   Welcome to the forum. 


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