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#1 Scampi

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 03:12 PM

HI there,

 

Our new facility isn't quite up and running just check so I'm busy getting my ducks in a row. The HACCP plan was written by a consultant (yuck) and has been accepted by CFAI. The plan states that I will check the concentration of our DETERGENT for the cleaning step of our sanitation program. The problem is, I can't find a kit or a process to verify the concentration what so ever? I saw in another post that the chemical supplier should provide this support, the current company is pretty blasé about the testing step so I'm more than willing to change companies to one who will support our process'

 

Thanks for any help!!


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#2 PetBone

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 03:21 PM

Yikes, I have never been asked to verify detergent concentration. I understand needing to verify sanitizer as it has to be at a certain PPM to sanitize appropriately but to my knowledge there is no such think in regards to detergent. Is there a code or regulation that requires that for some reason in Canada? 



#3 Scampi

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 03:28 PM

Not that I can find, but we are still waiting on final inspection to begin production and I don't really want to change the HACCP plan until after final inspection go ahead is given. I blame the consultant for putting it in the plan!!!! I wasn't involved in the creation of the plan. Its been added to my plan AND my operational record check, so I'm stuck!


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#4 fgjuadi

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 03:51 PM

Not that I can find, but we are still waiting on final inspection to begin production and I don't really want to change the HACCP plan until after final inspection go ahead is given. I blame the consultant for putting it in the plan!!!! I wasn't involved in the creation of the plan. Its been added to my plan AND my operational record check, so I'm stuck!

Seems like the risk is chemical contamination, and it's good that it's in the HACCP plan.  Most important to verify flush after CIP.  No doubt your supplier should be providing test materials.   In the mean time you can try to test pH, which won't be particularly accurate or helpful (unless you know what it's supposed to be and what the acceptable range is). 

 

I changed chemical suppliers because our previous company did not specialize in it and had no testing kits / training etc.  They were great on price and customer service, but we can't be putting chemicals on things if we don't know the concentration, even it's dish soap. 


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#5 RG3

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 04:39 PM

Hi Scampi :welcome:

 

I test the concentration of our detergent using a Low Alkalinity Test Kit - Chlorinated Alkaline looking for ozs/gal not PPM. I don't think an application for PPM on detergents exists. But again, it won't be helpful unless you know what it's supposed to be and what the acceptable range is.



#6 Snookie

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 05:31 PM

Check with your chemical supplier, they should be able to tell how to test and what normal usage is.  If they can't....find a new supplier. 


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#7 Scampi

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 05:42 PM

Thanks everyone for your input.

 

I have decided to shop for a new supplier. I am not confident at all with the current vendors products and support. My worst explanation to hear is "that's the way we've always done it" and turns out that's exactly what happened here.


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#8 mgourley

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 05:48 PM

Whomever you choose as a supplier should come in, observe the process or what needs to be cleaned and then provide you with the chemicals to do the job.

They should also supply you with recommendations on dilution rates/concentration percentages, then they should supply you with titration kits so that you can check to ensure your concentrations are right.

Better yet, they should come in on a monthly basis and do the titrations for you and provide you with a report.

 

Marshall



#9 RG3

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 06:44 PM

 My worst explanation to hear is "that's the way we've always done it" and turns out that's exactly what happened here.

That is the response from the pest control company and that's about the time I changed my service provider for my IPM.



#10 Snookie

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 07:54 PM

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#11 Harminnie

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Posted 13 November 2014 - 01:44 PM

Training:  When looking for a new chemical company,  make sure they do staff training for those involved in clean-up and testing of the water.  Be sure to include current staff and future/new staff.  Our supplier does this and is a great resource for the staff.  The company rep even provided a complimentary test kit and replaces testing agents as needed.  They also reviewed our processing and cleaning procedures with the staff, made suggestions and didn't try to get us to use more expensive items, etc. We are a small food manufacturing company and they've been a great resource. They provide good products and good service. Univar is the name of the company, They bought a more local company and the service has remained constant. Look in your area as they are an international company.



#12 tj7933

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Posted 13 November 2014 - 02:18 PM

Hi Scampi,

 

Meat Inspection Regulation 34 (2.1) states "(2.1) The sanitation program shall be prepared and maintained in accordance with the FSEP Manual and the Manual of Procedures and shall contain:  (e) the concentration, temperature and other specifications for the detergent, sanitizer or other chemical agent to be used"

 

           34 (2.2) Every operator shall keep in the registered establishment, for a period of not less than one year after the date of the activity or procedure, records that contain information about

  • (a) monitoring and verification activities, including the results of any test; and
  • (b) any corrective and preventative action taken.

 

 

FSEP 2014 states:

" The establishment has and implements a documented Sanitation Program which includes but is not limited to:

* Cleaning and sanitizing procedures including:

o Details and specifics describing the method and procedures for equipment and room cleaning and sanitizing,

o The chemicals required,

o The chemical concentration level required,

o Proper handling and application of chemicals (duration of application, etc.)

o The chemical solution temperatures, where applicable,

o Equipment disassembly and assembly instructions,

o Methods to prevent cross-contamination, where necessary;

* Records to be kept"

 

The expectation is that an operator will maintain records that can demonstrate that the chemicals being used, whether they be cleaning chemicals or sanitizing chemicals, are used at the chemical concentration level defined, and validated as effective, within the Sanitation Program.

 

That being said, there is a variety of ways that you can demonstrate that your cleaning chemicals are being used at the defined concentrations.

 

These include, but are certainly not limited to:

 

* Measuring the chemical and water being combined to be used.

* Chemical test kits

* If you are using a distribution system, visual observations may be effective is appropriately validated (ie: some cleaning chemicals will only foam at the proper concentrations)

* If you are using a distribution system, a regular inspection of the valve being used to dispense the chemical into the water (ie: PM programs) to ensure it is in proper condition and functioning,

* Verified effectiveness by continuous ATP, allergen or other environmental testing procedures.

 

If you are having trouble setting up a simple chemical testing procedure (due to lack of cooperation from your chemical supplier), talk to your CFIA inspector and ask what other options could be found as equally effective testing/verification methods.

 

Regardless, you will need to find a way to demonstrate the chemicals being used are being used at the concentrations defined within your Sanitation Program.



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#13 Scampi

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Posted 13 November 2014 - 03:10 PM

Thanks to all for your advice and help. I really do appreciate it.  I am in negotiations with a couple of chemical companies. I will look into univar as well.


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#14 Mi55V

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Posted 16 November 2014 - 08:14 AM

We have monthly scheduled checks carried out by our chemical supplier.  All our detergents are run through mixing / dispensing pumps and are calibrated each month to dispense chemicals around 100ppm conc.  Your supplier should be able to do this for you - our supplier uses a litmus paper style test kit which they advise we can buy and do the tests ourselves...I like the idea of our suppliers working a bit harder for us!



#15 Scampi

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Posted 18 November 2014 - 04:00 PM

We've found a new chemical supplier. They seem extraordinarily proficient and knowledgeable. The owner is completely on-board with the new company. Thank god i don't have to fight the "thats the way we've always done things" mentality on this one.

 

For anyone in southern ontario, canada, the company is Adept Chemical Technologies inc. 


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#16 Snookie

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Posted 18 November 2014 - 04:34 PM

Yay!!  Good Luck. 


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