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For sanitation is there a minimum water temperature requirement?


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Weebus90

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Posted 02 December 2014 - 01:36 PM

Hi Everyone, 

For sanitation is there a minimum water temperature requirement?

I currently am looking for information specifically for Massachusetts. 

I wasn't able to find an exact temperature for sanitation only for hand washing. 

 

Thanks

Weebus



Setanta

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Posted 02 December 2014 - 01:41 PM

Weebus,

There may be a temperature that is required for your cleaning chemicals I would look there first. 


-Setanta         

 

 

 


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Posted 02 December 2014 - 01:43 PM

Are you looking at CIP, COP, floor washing, line washing?

 

The temperature you require may be dependent on the equipment (in the case of CIP) or chemicals used.  Have you looked at any cleaning chemical MSDS to see if there is a recommended temperature?


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Posted 02 December 2014 - 01:44 PM

Weebus,

There may be a temperature that is required for your cleaning chemicals I would look there first. 

 

Great minds think alike  :roflmao:


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Posted 02 December 2014 - 01:46 PM

 

I wasn't able to find an exact temperature for sanitation only for hand washing. 

 

 

 

What do you find in relation to hand washing?  The CDC suggests lukewarm to warm water but has said that using cold water has no impact on reduction of microbes during hand washing:

 

http://www.cdc.gov/h...andwashing.html


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Tony-C

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Posted 02 December 2014 - 02:19 PM

Hi Everyone, 

For sanitation is there a minimum water temperature requirement?

I currently am looking for information specifically for Massachusetts. 

I wasn't able to find an exact temperature for sanitation only for hand washing. 

 

Thanks

Weebus

 

Hi Weebus,

 

Typically hot water sanitation should achieve the same minimum temperature profile as pasteurization, usually around a minimum of 165F although personally I use much hot water. The higher the temperature you can achieve without damaging your equipment the more effective the sanitation will be.

 

See this piece on dish washing:

Hot water for mechanical dish washing must be .......... 165 - 180F for sanitizing.

 

Regards,

 

Tony



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Posted 02 December 2014 - 05:58 PM

Dear Weebus,

 

I don't recall ever seeing a specific, related, comment in US Food Code but I have noticed many States base their own rules on this Code. Worth a look maybe.

 

I have  seen some specific SOPs in textboks for Sanitation /  food factory surfaces via application of heated liquids. As per Tony's comment, damage control is a likely problem. Clearly yr unknown set-up may impose self-limitations.

 

A similar situation also arises for laundry washing equipment. Typically optimized towards 70degC again from memory.

 

@Tony - Thanks for the very nice reference. My guess is that the contents are not original to Nebraska but cannot see any source mentioned.

 

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


RG3

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Posted 02 December 2014 - 07:30 PM

It's true what Setanta and Mr I. said, some chemicals require a certain temperature to activate. Read the product specification sheet or ask your chemical supplier, I mean that's why you're paying them tens of thousands if not hundreds of thousands of dollars.



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Posted 02 December 2014 - 07:38 PM

Also CIP systems may require a certain temperature, along with the chemicals and turbulent flow, to ensure that what is being cleaned is cleaned properly.


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Weebus90

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Posted 02 December 2014 - 09:26 PM

Thank you Everyone. 

This was all very helpful!

 

Weebus



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Posted 03 December 2014 - 01:42 PM

Also CIP systems may require a certain temperature, along with the chemicals and turbulent flow, to ensure that what is being cleaned is cleaned properly.

 

 

The return temperature is also very important on CIP systems.

 

Caz x



RG3

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Posted 03 December 2014 - 04:27 PM

The return temperature is also very important on CIP systems.

 

Caz x

And the temperature in the CIP tank. This is why it is important to have temp charts and even a conductivity probe read out.



fgjuadi

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Posted 03 December 2014 - 05:16 PM

Also CIP systems may require a certain temperature, along with the chemicals and turbulent flow, to ensure that what is being cleaned is cleaned properly.

CIPs are another ballgame entirely - gotta check your 5 Ts

 

Temp, time, turbulence, titration, and technology...


.--. .- -. - ... / --- .--. - .. --- -. .- .-..

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Posted 03 December 2014 - 05:52 PM

Hi Everyone, 

For sanitation is there a minimum water temperature requirement?

I currently am looking for information specifically for Massachusetts. 

I wasn't able to find an exact temperature for sanitation only for hand washing. 

 

Thanks

Weebus

 

 

CIPs are another ballgame entirely

 

Exactly

 

The return temperature is also very important on CIP systems.

 

Caz x

 

 

And the temperature in the CIP tank. This is why it is important to have temp charts and even a conductivity probe read out.

 

Only for the purposes of diagnosis, with some systems it could be completely irrelevant.

 

As Caz as posted, monitoring the CIP return is the most important thing.

 

Regards,

 

Tony



Mr. Incognito

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Posted 03 December 2014 - 05:52 PM

CIPs are another ballgame entirely - gotta check your 5 Ts

 

Temp, time, turbulence, titration, and technology...

 

Yeah.. but without knowing the actual subject of the original question I threw it out there as a bone.


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Tony-C

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Posted 03 December 2014 - 06:33 PM

Yeah.. but without knowing the actual subject of the original question I threw it out there as a bone.

 

Maybe you caught the bone that Weebus threw?



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Posted 03 December 2014 - 08:29 PM

Unless it's a requirement from the manufacturer of a specific piece of equipment, it doesn't make sense for any program to dictate a temperature..you would have to almost constantly monitor the output to be sure it wasn't fluctuating.

 

Definitely speak with your sanitation product supplier. We do not have a temperature requirement for our sanitation program. The products MUST be matched to the water you are using...not all products that require a higher temperature for efficacy will work with water that is extremely hard, as an example....

One of the first things my new supplier asked for was the most recent water report we had.


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mamad123

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Posted 04 December 2014 - 05:28 AM

hi there

 

It depends on the purpose of using water.. if you want to use water for sanitation activities (cleaning drains, surface and tools), there are several sources that  require hot water to be used.

because temperature is one of several main control in sanitizing instead of chem concentration, pressure, and time.

 

thanks


Edited by mamad123, 04 December 2014 - 05:28 AM.


Cathy

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Posted 04 December 2014 - 07:14 PM

The MA health department website includes a link to cleaning requirements for meat and poultry companies. There it says - "A minimum temperature of 180°F is required in water used for cleaning equipment, floors, walls, and the like, which are subject to contamination..." I don't know what kind of food product you produce, but this seems to be good advice.  You may want to go through their web site further -  http://www.mass.gov/...ood-safety.html

 


Cathy Crawford, HACCP Consulting Group
http://haccpcg.com/




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