Jump to content

  • Quick Navigation
Photo

Glass test for thick milk beverages

Glass inclusion

Best Answer MWidra, 11 February 2015 - 03:11 PM

As a non-drinker of alcohol, I'll pass on helping with the sensory evaluations.  But I would come visit you to "help you set up the methods."

 

Milk is very thick, and could sour and clog filter paper in the time that it takes for it to slowly go through.  If the beverages are thicker than milk it will go even slower.  Using a Büchner funnel with a vacuum flask or outlet might help, as well as doing this in the cold.

 

If I were to devise a test, I would do one of these:

 

1.  dilute the beverage about 3 times with water ( 1 part beverage, 2 parts water) but filter 3 times the volume.  You will get the same result, but it should filter faster.

 

2.  purchase a hand-driven centrifuge and centrifuge samples of the beverage.  The glass will go do the bottom.  You will need to remove almost all of the liquid by hand when it is done.  There are disposable dropping pipettes that you can use to suck off the top.

 

With both tests, I would think that you need to put any glass found onto a microscope to check.  I would make sure that for method 2 that you analyze enough volume to be sure that you catch any glass, but always express any results by # of glass fragments per unit volume.

 

You may need to see if these methods have been used and validated.  If not, you should be able to validate them for your use if you add a known amount of glass to some clean beverage in several concentrations and several replicates and show that the test is accurate and consistent.

 

Good luck and have fun.

 

Martha

Go to the full post


  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 ijohn

ijohn

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 2 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Saint Lucia
    Saint Lucia

Posted 07 February 2015 - 03:56 AM

Could someone help me with getting a test method for microscopic glass fragments in thick milk beverages?



#2 Quality Ben

Quality Ben

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 84 posts
  • 15 thanks
6
Neutral

  • Australia
    Australia
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Food Safety, Quality, Laboratory, Technical Issues, Water Activity and Migration, VITAL, Allergens, Fresh Produce, Post Harvest, Cold Smoked Fish, Non Pasteurised Caviar, Cook/Chill, Listeria Hunting & Eradication/Environmental monitoring programs, Small-Goods, HACCP, Continuous Improvement, Problem Solving, Risk Mitigation, Listeria.spp., High Risk, BRC, Freshcare, HARPS.



    Food Safety = Science + Culture

Posted 08 February 2015 - 08:31 AM

Lab filter paper would seem the easiest bet....... depending on the amount you are trying to test.

For large amounts you would need to look at a larger scale filtration system using say 100 micron etc (for ground glass)  depending on what you are trying to capture.



#3 Charles.C

Charles.C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Moderator
  • 17,464 posts
  • 4856 thanks
949
Excellent

  • Earth
    Earth
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:SF
    TV
    Movies

Posted 08 February 2015 - 03:41 PM

Could someone help me with getting a test method for microscopic glass fragments in thick milk beverages?

 

Dear ijohn,

 

Sounds like a specialised need of the AOAC "Filth Test", eg -

 

http://www.eoma.aoac.org/

(type "Filth" into the search box)

 

This reference / procedures are  available in most tech. libraries / food texts but I'm not so sure about yr location ??

 

Rgds / Charles.C

 

PS - this example is not for food but the analysis methodology is sort of typical -

 

Attached File  glass particle contamination.pdf   380.52KB   38 downloads

(see pg 226)

 

 


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


Thanked by 1 Member:

#4 ijohn

ijohn

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 2 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Saint Lucia
    Saint Lucia

Posted 09 February 2015 - 09:29 PM

Thanks for the help. I am from a small distillery in the Caribbean island of St.lucia and I trying get the Company HACCP Certified. The filth test works well for our rums, where we sieve the product using a 1 micron filter and then inspect for glass fragments under microscope. However, I will let you guys know if the filth test works for our cream products. My issue for now is whether the test is quick enough to allow real time monitoring of the capping machine during the product run.



#5 Snookie

Snookie

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 1,625 posts
  • 267 thanks
171
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Female

Posted 09 February 2015 - 09:31 PM

:welcome: .  

 

 

I would love to hear if it works on cream products.


Posted Image
Live Long & Prosper

#6 Quality Ben

Quality Ben

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 84 posts
  • 15 thanks
6
Neutral

  • Australia
    Australia
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Food Safety, Quality, Laboratory, Technical Issues, Water Activity and Migration, VITAL, Allergens, Fresh Produce, Post Harvest, Cold Smoked Fish, Non Pasteurised Caviar, Cook/Chill, Listeria Hunting & Eradication/Environmental monitoring programs, Small-Goods, HACCP, Continuous Improvement, Problem Solving, Risk Mitigation, Listeria.spp., High Risk, BRC, Freshcare, HARPS.



    Food Safety = Science + Culture

Posted 10 February 2015 - 08:43 AM

I would love to help with your sensory program  :happydance:



#7 it_rains_inside

it_rains_inside

    Grade - SIFSQN

  • IFSQN Senior
  • 341 posts
  • 93 thanks
44
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Ohio

Posted 10 February 2015 - 01:11 PM

QualityBen may need a second opinion on sensory evaluations, I volunteer to help out with that.

 

ijohn, I would venture to say that our products are probably being paired together! We produce bar mixes, with a majority of clientele  in the Caribbean area, cruise liners, etc.

I bet if we join forces, the sensory evaluations could get really fun!


"Peace is the result of retraining your mind to process life as it is, rather than as you think it should be"

                                -Wayne W. Dyer

 


#8 MWidra

MWidra

    Grade - PIFSQN

  • IFSQN Principal
  • 778 posts
  • 304 thanks
135
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:On the Beautiful Eastern Shore of MD
  • Interests:My Dogs (Beagles),Gardening, SciFi, Video Games (WoW, D3, HoS, PvZ), Classical Music, Legal Stuff, Science Stuff. I'm a Geeky Nerd.

Posted 11 February 2015 - 03:11 PM   Best Answer

As a non-drinker of alcohol, I'll pass on helping with the sensory evaluations.  But I would come visit you to "help you set up the methods."

 

Milk is very thick, and could sour and clog filter paper in the time that it takes for it to slowly go through.  If the beverages are thicker than milk it will go even slower.  Using a Büchner funnel with a vacuum flask or outlet might help, as well as doing this in the cold.

 

If I were to devise a test, I would do one of these:

 

1.  dilute the beverage about 3 times with water ( 1 part beverage, 2 parts water) but filter 3 times the volume.  You will get the same result, but it should filter faster.

 

2.  purchase a hand-driven centrifuge and centrifuge samples of the beverage.  The glass will go do the bottom.  You will need to remove almost all of the liquid by hand when it is done.  There are disposable dropping pipettes that you can use to suck off the top.

 

With both tests, I would think that you need to put any glass found onto a microscope to check.  I would make sure that for method 2 that you analyze enough volume to be sure that you catch any glass, but always express any results by # of glass fragments per unit volume.

 

You may need to see if these methods have been used and validated.  If not, you should be able to validate them for your use if you add a known amount of glass to some clean beverage in several concentrations and several replicates and show that the test is accurate and consistent.

 

Good luck and have fun.

 

Martha


Edited by MWidra, 11 February 2015 - 03:13 PM.

"...everything can be taken from a man but one thing:  the last of the human freedoms--to choose one's attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one's own way."  Viktor E. Frankl

 

"Life's like a movie, write your own ending."  The Muppets


Thanked by 1 Member:



0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users