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Sanitizing agent that doesn't require any waste water treatment


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#1 Supply safe food

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Posted 04 March 2015 - 05:10 PM

Hi I am looking for sanitizing agent that doesn't require any waste water treatment. The company I am working with don't have CIP system and for now we are using chlorine to sanitize the line. Is there any other sanitizing agent that you could share with me ?



#2 Snookie

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Posted 04 March 2015 - 06:09 PM

Am not sure what you mean by, "...waste water treatment.".   Also some information about the line and what the product is would help. 


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#3 xylough

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Posted 04 March 2015 - 06:19 PM

As to requiring wastewater treatment, that is a question only your state and local wastewater treatment jurisdiction authority can answer. The answer will vary widely by the regulations where your facility is located.

Generally the PAA (Peroxyacetic acid) family of sanitizing agents is considered more environmentally friendly, e.g., PAA are often allowed by organic certification bodies for use in facilities certified to produce organic food, because many PAA's are generally, short lived, easily rinsed and quickly dissipate their active ingredient (oxygen) and leave only a residue of acetic acid and water. Your chemical vendor can be an informative source for a question like this if your representative is knowledgeable and competent. Their is no easy, pat answer to your question.



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#4 Charles.C

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Posted 04 March 2015 - 06:39 PM

Hi I am looking for sanitizing agent that doesn't require any waste water treatment. The company I am working with don't have CIP system and for now we are using chlorine to sanitize the line. Is there any other sanitizing agent that you could share with me ?

 

As per Snookie, without more info. yr query is meaningfully rather unanswerable.

 

The necessity for "waste treatment" is often related to factors like the output BOD/COD. This is intimately related to yr product/process. A slaughterhouse may be rather different to a bottled water line.

 

ClO2 used to be one favorite for "clean" sanitizers, except for aspects like cost, convenience. "Green" sanitizers for fresh produce also commercially exist, eg based on PAA as mentioned in previous post.

 

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#5 Supply safe food

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Posted 04 March 2015 - 10:59 PM

As to requiring wastewater treatment, that is a question only your state and local wastewater treatment jurisdiction authority can answer. The answer will vary widely by the regulations where your facility is located.

Generally the PAA (Peroxyacetic acid) family of sanitizing agents is considered more environmentally friendly, e.g., PAA are often allowed by organic certification bodies for use in facilities certified to produce organic food, because many PAA's are generally, short lived, easily rinsed and quickly dissipate their active ingredient (oxygen) and leave only a residue of acetic acid and water. Your chemical vendor can be an informative source for a question like this if your representative is knowledgeable and competent. Their is no easy, pat answer to your question.

 

Thank you! it is helpfull.



#6 Supply safe food

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Posted 04 March 2015 - 11:04 PM

As per Snookie, without more info. yr query is meaningfully rather unanswerable.

 

The necessity for "waste treatment" is often related to factors like the output BOD/COD. This is intimately related to yr product/process. A slaughterhouse may be rather different to a bottled water line.

 

ClO2 used to be one favorite for "clean" sanitizers, except for aspects like cost, convenience. "Green" sanitizers for fresh produce also commercially exist, eg based on PAA as mentioned in previous post.

 

Rgds / Charles.C

 

Thank you.

 

What I mean by waste water treatment is mostly the PH of the waste water. Usually it should range somewhere in a neutral level around 7. I work for water company so I am looking for a better sanitizer to sanitize my line but wouldn't also change the PH much, to stay within the range. I will check the PAA.



#7 Supply safe food

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Posted 04 March 2015 - 11:43 PM

Am not sure what you mean by, "...waste water treatment.".   Also some information about the line and what the product is would help. 

Well, what I mean by waste water treatment is more of with adjusting the PH. the low requires us to stay in a neutral range of PH. My product is water and we sanitize the line with Chlorine. Now, I am getting high yeast count and I am looking for alternative.



#8 Charles.C

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Posted 05 March 2015 - 12:09 AM

Dear supply safe food,

 

At least to me, It remains unclear what yr process is. Yr username suggests a food manufacturing process. Perhaps just a diversion. :smile:

 

There are so many kinds of "waste water". eg wastewater (or waste water) as in an output from a food manufacturing unit, wastewater (or waste water) as in an input to a water purification plant.

 

With the addition of pH and yeast count, confusion totally rules. Sorry.

 

Rgds / Charles.C

 

 

 

 


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#9 fgjuadi

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Posted 05 March 2015 - 11:09 AM

Dear supply safe food,

 

At least to me, It remains unclear what yr process is. Yr username suggests a food manufacturing process. Perhaps just a diversion. :smile:

 

There are so many kinds of "waste water". eg wastewater (or waste water) as in an output from a food manufacturing unit, wastewater (or waste water) as in an input to a water purification plant.

 

With the addition of pH and yeast count, confusion totally rules. Sorry.

 

Rgds / Charles.C

Seems like they produce water and the CIP discharge has a low pH

 

When I worked in water we had a treatment system;  I can't help the OP too much


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#10 Supply safe food

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Posted 05 March 2015 - 10:32 PM

Seems like they produce water and the CIP discharge has a low pH

 

When I worked in water we had a treatment system;  I can't help the OP too much

 

Dear supply safe food,

 

At least to me, It remains unclear what yr process is. Yr username suggests a food manufacturing process. Perhaps just a diversion. :smile:

 

There are so many kinds of "waste water". eg wastewater (or waste water) as in an output from a food manufacturing unit, wastewater (or waste water) as in an input to a water purification plant.

 

With the addition of pH and yeast count, confusion totally rules. Sorry.

 

Rgds / Charles.C

 

Hi Charles,

 

It wasn't meant to confuse any one but I apologize if I assumed things understood. Let me explain the problem I have, I work for bottled water company and in California the law doesn't require as to have acidic output of sanitation from the line. Most companies use tank to neutralize what ever comes from the line and send it to drain after checking the pH which we call it waste water treatment. In our case we don't have waste water treatment so the only way to do it is to use sanitizing agent which wouldn't change our pH. For now we are using Chlorine but we are getting high yeast count. Therefore I am looking if I could get a better sanitizer which would reduce the yeast count.

 

Hope I am clear now.

 

Thanks



#11 Snookie

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Posted 06 March 2015 - 12:15 AM

When it comes to yeast have to confess I like Chlorine, but even PAA in the right dose isn't pH neutral.  Can you dilute with more water as it goes down the drain? 

You may have to try a few different things to find what works best.  But if your getting yeast with chlorine, you may be using at to low a dose trying to keep pH down. 


Edited by Snookie, 06 March 2015 - 12:16 AM.

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#12 Charles.C

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Posted 06 March 2015 - 04:34 AM

Hi Charles,

 

It wasn't meant to confuse any one but I apologize if I assumed things understood. Let me explain the problem I have, I work for bottled water company and in California the law doesn't require as to have acidic output of sanitation from the line. Most companies use tank to neutralize what ever comes from the line and send it to drain after checking the pH which we call it waste water treatment. In our case we don't have waste water treatment so the only way to do it is to use sanitizing agent which wouldn't change our pH. For now we are using Chlorine but we are getting high yeast count. Therefore I am looking if I could get a better sanitizer which would reduce the yeast count.

 

Hope I am clear now.

 

Thanks

 

Dear SSF,

 

Thks for the nice clarification.

 

I presume by "tank" you mean a standard wastewater treatment unit. I guess there may be a reason why this is a routine solution for other people. :smile:

 

As i am sure you know already, hypochlorites have a quite narrow pH efficiency range. Awkwardly so from yr Californian POV. And also maybe  beneficially from the yeast's POV. :smile:

 

I attach a limited but hopefully useful comparison of hypochlorites with some competitors. But i predict Snookie is right, some experimentation will be necessary. Maybe consult the anti-microbial suppliers first.

 

I believe PAA is now more user-friendly but previously was notoriously unfriendly, despite the salesman's comments.

 

Attached File  comparison wash water sanitation.pdf   14.48KB   23 downloads

 

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#13 Snookie

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Posted 06 March 2015 - 04:55 PM

 

 

I believe PAA is now more user-friendly but previously was notoriously unfriendly, despite the salesman's comments.

 

And definitely much more expensive. 


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