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Hot Water As A Sanitizer?

SQF Level 2 Clean Sanitize Hot Water Cleaner Sanitizer

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#1 JKRed

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Posted 10 June 2015 - 04:49 PM

Hoping this forum can settle a pretty "heated" debate (pun intended!).

 

In our discussion about Cleaning/Sanitizing as we pursue SQF Level 2 Certification, someone mentioned that they thought that the use of just Hot Water -- as long as it's hot enough and it reaches a certain temperature first -- was more than sufficient to use in the place of a standard Sanitizer solution instead.

 

Is this true? And, if so, what is the temperature that the Hot Water would need to be at in order to qualify and in order to fulfill the role of a "Sanitizer" in our process?

 

As always, thanks in advance for your time and help!

 

All The Best,

JKRed


Swimming In An Alphabet Soup of SQF Acronyms, Code, & Clauses!
 

"You do SQF Level 2 because your customers demand it. You do SQF Level 3 for yourselves, because you see the value in improving your systems and extending the philosophy and practices in SQF to other aspects of your business, beyond Food Safety." Anonymous


#2 gfdoucette07

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Posted 10 June 2015 - 05:43 PM

Yes you can, I had an aseptic plant use it and Its been a while but 175-180 for 4-5 mins if circulating rings a bell.

 

G



#3 Charles.C

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Posted 10 June 2015 - 06:10 PM

Hi jkred,

 

I would anticipate that the potential is totally dependent on the condition of whatever you propose to use it for/on ?

 

I rather doubt that the sales of Sanitizers is wholly based on word-of-mouth. :smile:


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#4 AudreyB

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Posted 10 June 2015 - 08:08 PM

The use of hot water or steam is an option for sanitizing - but it'll truly depend on your needs and available tools. 

 

Keep in mind, when using heat as a sanitation medium, temperature is not the only key factor - the amount of time is also vital.

 

For it to be truly effective, I would say aim for a minimum of 77/78 C (IMO aim closer to the 82-84 mark) and run for 5+ minutes.   



#5 JKRed

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Posted 11 June 2015 - 11:21 AM

Interesting indeed. Glad to hear that the "length of time" being washed at a certain temp is just as critical as the actual temperature itself since that's where we ultimately landed when we assumed it was possible to go this route. 

 

Thanks everyone!

 

All The Best,

JKRed


Swimming In An Alphabet Soup of SQF Acronyms, Code, & Clauses!
 

"You do SQF Level 2 because your customers demand it. You do SQF Level 3 for yourselves, because you see the value in improving your systems and extending the philosophy and practices in SQF to other aspects of your business, beyond Food Safety." Anonymous


#6 Charles.C

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Posted 11 June 2015 - 11:52 AM

Interesting indeed. Glad to hear that the "length of time" being washed at a certain temp is just as critical as the actual temperature itself since that's where we ultimately landed when we assumed it was possible to go this route. 

 

Thanks everyone!

 

All The Best,

JKRed

And yr results for ATP / micro. swab test on Surface X/ProductY/ConditionZ ? :smile:


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#7 Charles.C

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Posted 11 June 2015 - 01:54 PM

bit more operational info -

 

Hot-water sanitizing—through immersion (small parts, knives, etc.), spray (dishwashers), or circulating systems—is commonly used. The time required is determined by the temperature of the water. Typical regulatory requirements (Food Code 1995) for use of hot water in dishwashing and utensil sanitizing applications specify immersion for at least 30 sec. at 77°C (170°F) for manual operations; and a final rinse temperature of 74°C (165°F) in single tank, single temperature machines and 82°C (180°F) for other machines.

 

Many state regulations require a utensil surface temperature of 71°C (160°F), as measured by an irreversibly registering temperature indicator in warewashing machines. Recommendations and requirements for hot-water sanitizing in food processing may vary. The Grade A Pasteurized Milk Ordinance specifies a minimum of 77°C (170°F) for 5 min. Other recommendations for processing operations are 85°C (185°F) for 15 min., or 80°C (176°F) for 20 min.

 

The primary advantages of hot-water sanitization are relatively inexpensive, easy to apply, and readily available, generally effective over a broad range of microorganisms, relatively non-corrosive, and penetrates into cracks and crevices. Hot-water sanitization is a slow process that requires come-up and cool-down time; can have high energy costs; and has certain safety concerns for employees. The process also has the disadvantages of forming or contributing to film formations and shortening the life of certain equipment or parts thereof (gaskets, etc.)

 

 

https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs077.

 

 Hot water - an effective, non-selective sanitization method for food contact surfaces; however, spores may remain alive even after an hour of boiling temperatures.  The microbicidal action is thought to be the coagulation of some protein molecules in the cell.  The use of hot water has several advantages in that it is readily available, inexpensive and nontoxic.  Sanitizing can be accomplished by either pumping the water through assembled equipment or immersing equipment into the water.  
When pumping it through equipment, the temperature should be maintained to at least 171ÿF. (77ÿC) for at least 5 minutes as checked at the outlet end of the equipment.  When immersing equipment, the water should be maintained at a temperature of a least 171ÿF. (77ÿC) or above for 30 seconds.

 

Attached File  Clean And Sanitize.pdf   109.96KB   120 downloads

 

 Cleaning and Sanitization
 
Each factory should have a specific cleaning schedule with a formal cleaning plan for the specific zones, indicating what should be cleaned, the frequency of cleaning, the cleaning method and the responsibility for cleaning.
 
Wet  cleaning  of  parts  of  equipment,  moulds  or  utensils  should  be  performed  in separate rooms.  Here, manual or automated techniques using water and detergents can be applied.
 
After cleaning and sanitization, if necessary, rinsing and immediate drying should take place.
 
Chocolate production is considered a dry operation and water should only be used if wet cleaning is absolutely required.  It should only be applied to small areas at a time
and  complete  and  immediate  drying  should  be  ensured.    Dry  cleaning  of  floor  and equipment  will  include  scraping,  brushing  and  vacuum  treatment,  followed  by sanitizing  for  example  with  a  food-grade,  alcohol-based  disinfectant  or  a  strong hypochlorite solution.
 
All potentially dangerous chemicals such as cleaning chemicals and fumigants should be  stored  securely  and  in  such  a  manner  as  to  prevent  the  contamination  of  raw materials, products or the process environment.

 

Attached File  Best practice for cocoa,chocolate,confectionery industry.pdf   72.08KB   66 downloads


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#8 JKRed

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Posted 12 June 2015 - 11:33 AM

Fantastic resources -- THANK YOU Charles C.!

 

JKRed


Swimming In An Alphabet Soup of SQF Acronyms, Code, & Clauses!
 

"You do SQF Level 2 because your customers demand it. You do SQF Level 3 for yourselves, because you see the value in improving your systems and extending the philosophy and practices in SQF to other aspects of your business, beyond Food Safety." Anonymous


#9 FoodSafetyMan7775

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Posted 05 August 2020 - 10:13 AM

In the USA: 21CFR129.80(d)(2) Hot water in enclosed system: At least 170 deg. F for at least 15 minutes or at least 200 deg. F for at least 5 minutes.







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