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Bergel

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Posted 20 August 2015 - 02:17 PM

Good day everyone,

 

We have some employees that are wearing jewelry or adornment of a sort and they refuse to remove it because it is not allowed on their religious belief or cultural practices.

 

What we did is created a log with the names of the employees and what sort of jewelry/ adornment they are wearing. They have to show the jewelries to their supervisor at the beginning and end of their shift to ensure that they did not missed it. But it backfired to us since other employees started to complain like how come they are allowed and they are not.

 

Your views and inputs will be very helpful to us to have better controls.

 

Thanks in advance...

 

Regards,

Bergel

 

 



Setanta

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Posted 20 August 2015 - 02:32 PM

You won't like it, buy the best control is to not allow any jewelry on the production/packaging floor.  Please search this site using jewelry as a key word and you will find many, many threads about jewelry,


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brianweber

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Posted 20 August 2015 - 02:35 PM

I have gone with no jewelry allowed other than a single no stones wedding band. When employees are hired they sign a GMP document that states that no jewelry is allowed. Don't like the rules, find a different job. I am not going to risk contamination/adulteration of a product to a customer.


Brian


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Bergel

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Posted 20 August 2015 - 07:50 PM

Thanks Brian and Setanta. It so happen that one of our company's Code of Ethics is "Diversity and Inclusion". We could not simply refuse someone because of his cultural and religious beliefs. So we are asked to have controls in place for such issue.



MWidra

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Posted 20 August 2015 - 08:43 PM

The only other piece of jewelry that you need to consider is a medical alert item, usually a bracelet.  Anyone who is supposed to wear one should not remove it while they are working, it could mean the difference between life and death.  You can stipulate that they lock onto the person and cannot easily come off, then require them to be covered by some kind of either tape or band.  The medical alert neckpieces are usually not made with a clasp and would not come off, but they have to be very long to get over someone's head so they could hang into the food.

 

As for religious jewelry, maybe stipulate that it cannot be worn on the hand or wrist, but as a necklace which is placed under the clothing while in the production areas.  If it comes off, hopefully it will get caught in their clothing.

 

Your idea of inspection of jewelry is not bad, but it must be a pain for the supervisors.

 

Just some suggestions, you have a real balancing act to satisfy your company code but protect the food and the workers.

 

Martha


"...everything can be taken from a man but one thing:  the last of the human freedoms--to choose one's attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one's own way."  Viktor E. Frankl

 

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Posted 20 August 2015 - 09:38 PM

In the age of "Diversity and Inclusion" this becomes a problem. 

Companies can choose to be as diverse or as inclusive as they wish. However, if said company is producing food for consumption, foreign material control outweighs diversity and inclusion.

 

I doubt very much that a company's dedication to diversity and inclusion will trump lack of due diligence when a consumer bites into a piece of religious adornment and files a law suit.

Just my opinion.

 

Marshall



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Bergel

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Posted 23 August 2015 - 07:32 AM

Thanks Martha. I think the idea of wearing it as a necklace would help. We require that people tuck their upper garment in their waistband. So if it is accidentally comes off, it will be caught on their cloth.

 

Marshall, i do agree with you it really is a big issue for Food Safety personnel like me. Our company started to employ hearing challenge people. We used the same strategy for people with hearing aids.

 

Another control that we have been considering is to assign these people to work in areas where FO contamination is least likely to occur.

 

I truly appreciate all your inputs.



dv8dawn

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Posted 23 August 2015 - 08:52 AM

Hi Bergel,

 

In an alternative way, you could segregate the work place as high care area and low care area.

 

Further, you can schedule those “some employees” to work in low care area unless and until they persuade/adhere the food safety rules. :shades:

 

Anyway, I strongly agree that, we will not succeed to take a single step without management commitment. :silly:

 

Cheers,

 

Dv8.



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Bergel

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Posted 23 August 2015 - 11:57 AM

Thanks Dv8, Yes it is one of the options that we will present to our management and if it works, will be part of all new hires program. 



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Posted 01 September 2015 - 09:31 AM

We have a no of plants and practice "No jewellary" policy in most of the. However, we also come acroos some religious beliefs associated with wearing some speciifc jewellary like glass bangles, nose pins, necklace etc. In those plants, we have replaced glass bangles with single plain plastic bands and have given them aprons with sleeves firmly closed at the wrist level. Some of them (depending on their work area) are asked to wear gloves above which the wrist band of the sleeve tightens.

 

Generally we place these staff in low risk areas.

 

Similar protective clothing has been designed to prevent threat from other jewllaries.

 

Regards,

Meena


Regards,

 


Setanta

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Posted 01 September 2015 - 12:42 PM

Thanks Brian and Setanta. It so happen that one of our company's Code of Ethics is "Diversity and Inclusion". We could not simply refuse someone because of his cultural and religious beliefs. So we are asked to have controls in place for such issue.

 

I understand supporting diversity and inclusion, but I don't know of any religions that mandates its adherent wear any kind of jewelry.  They may want to, but I don't think it is the same as a Hijab.


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Suzie B

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Posted 01 September 2015 - 02:13 PM

In our roles as FSQA, the rules are black and white.  Once you make concessions, you enter a grey area you don't want to be in.  As you said, you are causing contention by allowing some employees to practice what is technically a violation of Food Safety Code and not allowing others.  Everyone has a religion or belief.  No one religious faction should be given preference over another in the name of diversity.  We are here to do a job, and that job has specific rules, GMPs, that you simply cannot bend for any reason (other than medical, but that is already addressed in the code).  You are not practicing diversity, you are bowing to pressure.  I absolutely agree with mgourley.  Do your job, and insist they do theirs.  Allowing anyone to break the rules puts your company in a high risk situation.   Not worth it.

 

People are free to find work in an industry that doesn't require them to go against their religious beliefs. 

 

~S~



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Posted 01 September 2015 - 03:08 PM

I totally understand and appreciate your commitment to "diversity and inclusion"! Too many times I have suffered discrimination in the professional environment due to my own religious beliefs. As a Pastafarian, I am obligated to adorn my body with various things throughout the year in accordance with our established holidays and celebrations. I have been a member of the Church of FSM (Flying Spaghetti Monsterism) for several years now and some places of employment have been more understanding than others. For instance, in mid December we have a holiday that we refer to as "holiday" and during said holiday it is customary to wear a huge bowl of spaghetti on top of your head and carry a garlic bread stick in every pocket. The bowl of spaghetti on the head is a symbol that our god (the invisible Flying Spaghetti Monster) is constantly looking down and watching our every move and listening to us even when we mumble or whisper. The garlic bread stick in every pocket is a symbol that in order to receive good favor in our society today and have ample influence over people and events around you, you need to have some bread (money). As mentioned earlier, my religion is one of the most discriminated against religions in the world. Most people refuse to even admit we exist. :-(

 

An employer from my past once asked me if I would mind taking off my huge hat helmet that was full to the brim with 3 gallons of cooked spaghetti and marinara sauce, and I replied, "It's not about whether or not I mind, it's about me taking this thing off and then the invisible Flying Spaghetti Monster raining down meatballs all over the entire production floor! You don't want that now DO YOU?" The supervisor shot me a strange look and I retorted "Look, if you don't believe what I believe, that is fine, but don't expect me to go to hell with you just because the long noodle appendage of the Flying Spaghetti Monster has never touched your soul and selected you as one of the few chosen to enter the kingdom of heaven!"  The supervisor finally backed off, which is good because I was really close to calling him bigot. I have come to far with my faith to simple abandon it for something as silly as "protecting the public at large from contaminated food products and possible injury/death". If the Flying Spaghetti Monster wills it, then so shall it be.    Thank you for fighting the good fight over there and protecting everyone's rights!

 

 

In his name we pray, RAMEN

 

Plastic Ducky



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IzzyP

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Posted 01 September 2015 - 04:20 PM

I totally understand and appreciate your commitment to "diversity and inclusion"! Too many times I have suffered discrimination in the professional environment due to my own religious beliefs. As a Pastafarian, I am obligated to adorn my body with various things throughout the year in accordance with our established holidays and celebrations. I have been a member of the Church of FSM (Flying Spaghetti Monsterism) for several years now and some places of employment have been more understanding than others. For instance, in mid December we have a holiday that we refer to as "holiday" and during said holiday it is customary to wear a huge bowl of spaghetti on top of your head and carry a garlic bread stick in every pocket. The bowl of spaghetti on the head is a symbol that our god (the invisible Flying Spaghetti Monster) is constantly looking down and watching our every move and listening to us even when we mumble or whisper. The garlic bread stick in every pocket is a symbol that in order to receive good favor in our society today and have ample influence over people and events around you, you need to have some bread (money). As mentioned earlier, my religion is one of the most discriminated against religions in the world. Most people refuse to even admit we exist. :-(

 

An employer from my past once asked me if I would mind taking off my huge hat helmet that was full to the brim with 3 gallons of cooked spaghetti and marinara sauce, and I replied, "It's not about whether or not I mind, it's about me taking this thing off and then the invisible Flying Spaghetti Monster raining down meatballs all over the entire production floor! You don't want that now DO YOU?" The supervisor shot me a strange look and I retorted "Look, if you don't believe what I believe, that is fine, but don't expect me to go to hell with you just because the long noodle appendage of the Flying Spaghetti Monster has never touched your soul and selected you as one of the few chosen to enter the kingdom of heaven!"  The supervisor finally backed off, which is good because I was really close to calling him bigot. I have come to far with my faith to simple abandon it for something as silly as "protecting the public at large from contaminated food products and possible injury/death". If the Flying Spaghetti Monster wills it, then so shall it be.    Thank you for fighting the good fight over there and protecting everyone's rights!

 

 

In his name we pray, RAMEN

 

Plastic Ducky

 Your religion is as genuine as all other accepted religions.

 

You are not alone!

 

http://www.mirror.co...vla-ban-5522771



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Posted 01 September 2015 - 04:21 PM

I have gone with no jewelry allowed other than a single no stones wedding band. When employees are hired they sign a GMP document that states that no jewelry is allowed. Don't like the rules, find a different job. I am not going to risk contamination/adulteration of a product to a customer.

 

 

We had that rule, then we nearly had a "ring avulsion" injury.  Google that term if you must, but basically your ring gets hooked on something and you rip your finger off.  

 

Now, no nothing.  Easier to enforce too. 



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Posted 01 September 2015 - 04:32 PM


I'm entitled to my opinion, even a stopped clock is right twice a day

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Posted 01 September 2015 - 05:09 PM

We are totally jewellery free, with the one exception of medical alerts. I agree with PP, if you don't like the rules, go work somewhere else. We are a multi cultural facility and have received ZERO push back from any employees.... religion of one individuals should never ever trump the safety of the public. PERIOD


Please stop referring to me as Sir/sirs


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Posted 01 September 2015 - 08:07 PM

A no tolerance policy is the best way. But it is hard to enforce when no food safety culture exists and upper management is not on board. If there is only one person who is blowing the whistle all the time it is near impossible to get people to change. Really need to get a commitment from both the senior management types as well as the production management and supervisors. In my experience that has been key in getting 100% compliance.



dv8dawn

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Posted 02 September 2015 - 08:23 AM

Without management's commitment, it is nothing more than an exercise in futility. :blink:






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