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Spec for Quaternary Ammonium Sanitizer Concentration?


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#1 idealdreams

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Posted 28 September 2015 - 05:55 PM

We have a unit that automatically takes concentrated quat sanitizer and dilutes it with water to the appropriate PPM. This PPM is not set by us, but rather the company that provides us our chemicals. They refill the reservoirs on a weekly basis. I test the concentration of the sanitizer every week and it's usually 400 ppm or higher. This week it was roughly 300 ppm. I am wondering if this is something I should be concerned about or if this is okay and the sanitizer is still good to use. Is there a general spec for the typical concentration of quat sanitizer?

 

Thanks!



#2 RMAV

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Posted 28 September 2015 - 06:09 PM

Check the sanitizer label.  In the U.S., sanitizers (along with herbicide and pesticides) are required to be used within the limits specified on the product label.

 

At over 400ppm, you're probably above the limit for no-rinse food-contact surfaces, but check your label to be sure.



#3 Charles.C

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Posted 28 September 2015 - 07:32 PM

We have a unit that automatically takes concentrated quat sanitizer and dilutes it with water to the appropriate PPM. This PPM is not set by us, but rather the company that provides us our chemicals. They refill the reservoirs on a weekly basis. I test the concentration of the sanitizer every week and it's usually 400 ppm or higher. This week it was roughly 300 ppm. I am wondering if this is something I should be concerned about or if this is okay and the sanitizer is still good to use. Is there a general spec for the typical concentration of quat sanitizer?

 

Thanks!

 

Hi idealdreams,

 

It may relate to what you're doing with it ?


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#4 mgourley

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Posted 28 September 2015 - 09:55 PM

No rinse quat sanitizer should be no higher than 400ppm for food contact surfaces.

 

200-400 is the generally acceptable range, so if you are at 300ppm, you have the happy medium.

 

As said above, what surfaces are you using the sanitizer on?

 

Marshall



#5 KTD

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Posted 30 September 2015 - 04:12 PM

Hi Idealdreams -

 

     Any sanitizer used in the US has to be approved by EPA as a 'pesticide' under FIFRA. The label is required to clearly identify the conditions of use as approved by EPA - surface (porous, no-porous), contact time, concentration range, rinse after Attached File  21CFR178.1010 Sanitizers & Concentrations.pdf   186.55KB   75 downloadsor not, etc. FDA has a few regs discussing the use of sanitizers. USDA FSIS lets you use the label and these FDA regs, rather than setting their own requirements.

 

     In addition to the attached FDA reg, 21 CFR 173.315 & 173.370 have applications for FDA products - I dont have those handy, but can get if needed.

 

     One thing to recognize with quats - there are 2 different sets of usage instructions depending on whether the quat is 2- or 4-chain. 4-chain quats usually have higher allowed usage levels.

 

KTD



#6 Bill78

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Posted 30 September 2015 - 05:22 PM

idealdreams, 

One thing to consider is more frequent checks of the quat concentration. The metering systems used by all these chemical companies are all subject to failure. I check the system daily and there have been numerous times over the years that the metering tips are clogged ( resulting in low or no concentration) or the metering tip is missing all together due to some zealous sanitation employee "trying" to fix the situation. Low concentration levels result in inadequate micro cleaning and high concentration levels, that aren't rinsed, are a potential hazard to your customers. You could go an entire week in either one of those conditions. Just something to think about. Best of Luck! 



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#7 Mulan1010

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Posted 06 October 2015 - 06:52 PM

We also check our sanitizers daily to ensure our metering systems are working properly.  Also, if you do not have one, you do need to obtain a copy of the specification sheet for the quaternary ammonia sanitizer you are using.  The specs are required to be available by SQF and our government inspectors request them from time to time as well.  The specs will tell you at what concentrations it is acceptable to use on food contact surfaces and what concentrations are recommended for non-food contact surfaces.  You should want to be in the mid to lower range of the concentration range so you do not waste money and there is less of a risk of the sanitizer being too strong.



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