Jump to content

  • Quick Navigation
Photo
- - - - -

What is the E Number of Vanillin?


  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 ashique

ashique

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 5 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • India
    India

Posted 20 February 2016 - 04:16 PM

Can any one help me.

 

I wanna know the E number of Vanillin. I looked in more sites,  but couldn,t find it.

 

Actually Vanillin doesn't have E number



#2 karina.j

karina.j

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 70 posts
  • 23 thanks
5
Neutral

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:South Wales

Posted 22 February 2016 - 09:41 AM

hi

as you said vanillin does not have an e number

 

In database I use there was information:

 

Note: Vanillin is an artificial flavoring. It may also be called "Vanilla flavoring." Only use pure vanilla. Pure vanilla extract comes from the vanilla bean plant -- not tree pulp, petroleum, or beaver anal glands.



#3 LKruizinga

LKruizinga

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 2 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Netherlands
    Netherlands

Posted 22 February 2016 - 02:00 PM

I have the following info on vanillin:

 

Though there are many compounds present in the extracts of vanilla, the compound predominantly responsible for the characteristic flavour and smell of vanilla is known as vanillin.

 

 

Vanilla essence comes in two forms: the actual extract of the seedpods, and the far cheaper synthetic essence, basically consisting of a solution of synthetic vanillin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde):

 

 

 

Natural vanilla is an extremely complicated mixture of several hundred different compounds, versus synthetic vanillin which is derived from phenol and is of high purity. However, it may be difficult to determine the difference between natural and synthetic vanilla flavouring.

 

 

 

So far I know vanillin does not have an e-number.



#4 agave

agave

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 3 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Earth
    Earth

Posted 22 February 2016 - 03:34 PM

hi ashique

vanillin does not have an e-number



#5 teresa gonçalves

teresa gonçalves

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 19 posts
  • 21 thanks
2
Neutral

  • Portugal
    Portugal

Posted 22 February 2016 - 10:06 PM

Can any one help me.

 

I wanna know the E number of Vanillin. I looked in more sites,  but couldn,t find it.

 

Actually Vanillin doesn't have E number

Good night, I don't know your name, but perhaps this can help you, vanillin doesn't have a E number, but I'll send you a link with some information in EU legislation about Aditives (Those with E numbers) and flavourings like Vanillia.

 

http://ec.europa.eu/...v_index_en.html

 

Best regards

Teresa Gonçalves



#6 ashique

ashique

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 5 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • India
    India

Posted 25 February 2016 - 08:07 AM

Thanks All,

 

But Still I am confused, Why doesn't vanillin have an E - Number. How can I convene someone asking the E -Number of Vanillin.



#7 karina.j

karina.j

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 70 posts
  • 23 thanks
5
Neutral

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:South Wales

Posted 25 February 2016 - 08:49 AM

hi
just tell them that
E-numbers are simply the code numbers used to identify food additives that have been shown to be safe and officially approved for use in food across the EU. 

Vanillin is approved just hasn't been given E number. (what is there to not understand???)

 

It can be extracted directly from vanilla beans or can also be made through different fermentation processes or other starting materials can also be converted to vanillin by chemical processes.

 

found online:

 

The Example of Vanillin

To make the regulatory complexities more tangible, let us apply the US and EU regulatory variations to vanillin, the molecule that gives vanilla its flavor. This flavor ingredient can be produced in a number of different ways, and the method used to produce it determines whether a natural claim will or will not be allowed.

vanilla.jpg
Vanilla flavor is a good
example of how the same
flavor type can be achieved
through both natural and
synthetic processes.

When vanillin is extracted directly from vanilla beans, both the US and EU regulatory authorities allow a natural claim. When vanilla extract is subjected to fractional distillation to isolate the vanillin component, the labeling on the consumer product may be indicated as ‘natural vanilla flavor’ in the US and Europe.

Vanillin can also be made through different fermentation processes. Fermentation from a starting material such as ferulic acid, allows for the extraction of the vanillin from a variety of natural sources including coffee beans, apple and orange pips, and wheat bran. If vanillin is made using the ferulic acid fermentation process, a ‘natural flavor’ claim can still be made in both the US and Europe. If the vanillin is produced through fermentation from another source, for example guaiacol, the labeling of the products begin to differ. In the US, if the process is not approved the material is labeled as both ‘artificial’ or ‘synthetic,’ whereas in the EU the material may still be labeled as ‘natural’.

Other starting materials can also be converted to vanillin by chemical processes – for example, lignin can be heated with an alkali and an oxidation agent to create a synthetic (or artificial) version of vanillin. In this case, the product would be labeled in both the US and Europe as ‘artificial’ or ‘synthetic’ vanillin.

Finally, there is the molecule ethyl vanillin that is not found in nature and is typically produced using synthetic chemistry. The US label claim would be ‘artificial vanilla flavor’ but in Europe, the label claim is ‘vanilla flavoring’. The absence of the word natural in Europe  implies that it is an artificial flavor.

- See more at: http://www.sigmaaldr...s.html#vanillin



#8 moskito

moskito

    Grade - SIFSQN

  • IFSQN Senior
  • 375 posts
  • 75 thanks
16
Good

  • Germany
    Germany
  • Gender:Male

Posted 27 February 2016 - 01:53 PM

Hi

form the legal point flavours are not regulated as additives. Only additives are named additionally by E-numbers.

Please have a look in the FIR (for EU) where the difference becomes clear (ingredient, food, flavor, additive etc.). Internationally it is similar regulated.

 

Rgds

moskito






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users