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What is the definition of COP, CIP, SIP and SOP?


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#1 Tuan Tran Anh

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Posted 16 March 2016 - 12:37 PM

Now I am working in the Aseptic line. In the old technical line, during the sanitary process filler only carry out CIP process. However, with Aseptic line he sanitary process carry out 4 process: COP, CIP, SIP,SOP. What’s the purpose of each process? What’s different of 4 process?



#2 RMAV

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Posted 16 March 2016 - 02:22 PM

I assume the acronyms are:

 

CIP = Clean in Place

COP = Clean out of Place

SIP = Sanitize in Place

SOP = Sanitize out of Place

 

The old "technical" line may have only required CIP, where that process would clean all necessary surfaces to an acceptable level.  Your new "aseptic" line may require additional disassembly for COP and additional sanitizing (or the EU term, disinfection) to achieve the necessary cleanliness.  Again, I'm making assumptions.



#3 Tuan Tran Anh

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Posted 19 March 2016 - 02:03 AM

Understood. But what's different of 4 process???



#4 Tony-C

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Posted 19 March 2016 - 02:48 AM

With an aseptic line I would think sterilize in place is a better description. I'm not sure there should be anything that is sterilized 'out of place'. I would consult your manufacturer's guidelines.

 

Kind regards,

 

Tony

 

 



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#5 liberator

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 08:49 PM

CIP and SIP (Clean in place and Santise in place) Basically means the equipment is cleaned in situ - typically there is a CIP 'kitchen' that provides the CIP solutions directly to the plant to clean (caustic, acid etc). They detergents are circulated through a  network of pipes and spray balls into the plant being washed and then returned to the CIP kitchen for reuse. Typically there is no requirement to pull the plant completely apart and wash/sanitise individual items. The CIP detergents circulate throughout the plant for a  predetermined time and detergent strength. Once washed with the detergent the system then steps onto a rinse with potable to remove detergent residues, then a rinse with a sanitiser (sodium hypochlorite for example) and then a  final rise with potable water to remove sanitiser residues. This is all done without the need for operators to get put scrubbing brushes, scourers cleaning cloths etc to wash the plant.The plant is now cleaned and ready for manufacture.

 

COP and SOP - typically means to pull apart the plant down to their individual items, e.g. pipe keyways, 'o'-rings, baker mixing bowls, mixing blades and other items and to then wash/sanitise them away from the plant. Parts may be washed in a sink, tub  or a dedicated washing site but the parts are not washed within the plant as is the case with CIP/SIP.



#6 Tony-C

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 02:28 AM

What you have written Liberator may be true for most operations but the OP is about an Aseptic line. With aseptic lines you sterilise with heat pre-production - 'UHT plants are fully automatic and have four operating modes: plant presterilisation, production, AIC (Aseptic Intermediate Cleaning) and CIP (Cleaning In Place).' Source Dairy Products Handbook.

 

I certainly would not recommend using hypochlorite given the temperatures involved.

 

Kind regards,

 

Tony



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