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Suitability/Acceptability of cleaning chemicals


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#1 Andy_Yellows

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 07:28 AM

Hi all,

 

Just wondering about selection of cleaning chemicals for food preparation areas. How do we know if they are food-safe or not? In the past week I've had members of our prep team asking whether they are ok to use Cillit Bang and Cif cream cleaner to clean walls and other surfaces and I haven't really known what to tell them. Is there a specific symbol to look out for to confirm whether it is safe for food prep areas or are there other criteria that need to be met? Any help would be appreciated.

 

Regards,

 

Andy


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#2 Charles.C

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 11:35 AM

Hi all,

 

Just wondering about selection of cleaning chemicals for food preparation areas. How do we know if they are food-safe or not? In the past week I've had members of our prep team asking whether they are ok to use Cillit Bang and Cif cream cleaner to clean walls and other surfaces and I haven't really known what to tell them. Is there a specific symbol to look out for to confirm whether it is safe for food prep areas or are there other criteria that need to be met? Any help would be appreciated.

 

Regards,

 

Andy

 

Hi Andy,

 

One Query - Does your facility possess a QA Department ?.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#3 Andy_Yellows

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 11:52 AM

It does Charles, why?


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#4 Charles.C

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 12:50 PM

It does Charles, why?

 

It is normally the QA responsibility to generate documentation for Purchasing/Receiving Control regarding acceptable chemicals for use in a Food manufactiring Facility. Such is usually mandatory if the facility is certified to any recognised FS Standard. From yr OP it sounds like such Documentation does not exist.

 

Acceptance is particularly based on deriving from an Approved Suppplier.

 

An Approved Supplier is typically based on the supplier/product exhibiting certain validatable charcteristics to be defined by QA. These are discussed in volumes of posts on this Forum and i would have expected to be already well-known to yr QA and implemented accordingly.

 

Hence my Query.


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Charles.C


#5 Charles.C

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Posted 09 August 2016 - 01:01 PM

addendum

 

Just noticed yr parallel post -

http://www.ifsqn.com...ce/#entry104679

 

Maybe that is part of an answer to my query also.

 

PS -

With respect to the Product itself, Safety acceptability may be validatable in various ways, for example via (a) an Official list of approved cleaning chemicals/manufacturers/logos/scope of usage for use in food facilities as maintained by certain Countries, (b) appropriate Official Product Specification/Documentation possibly including items like COAs/SDSs. Text such as "suitable for use in Food Manufacturing facilities" must appear somewhere in the Specification and be justified by the associated compositional/analytical data .

 

Personally i tend to, at least initially, go for Products from "Name" organisations since their (usually) elevated costs are likely compensated  by Technical Reliability/Information/Advisory Services. Subsequently experience enables diversity.


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Charles.C


#6 Charles.C

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Posted 10 August 2016 - 09:11 PM

addendum 2 -

 

Hi Andy,

 

I thought these edited snippets from SQF/AIB might usefully illustrate the relevance of  "Specifications"

 

2.3.2   Implementation Guidance

What does it mean?

This element links with 2.4.5 Incoming Goods and Services.

Before an approved supplier program can be implemented, specifications must be in place for all materials that could impact product safety and quality.  This relates to raw materials, ingredients, packaging materials, processing aids, additives and chemicals used within their facility including cleaning compounds.  The supplier is required to keep Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) (added – now apparently “SDS” sheets) and labels for all chemicals that are in use on-site.

 

Specifications must also meet the standards set by regulation in the country of origin and the country (ies) of intended destination.  This includes maximum residue levels, allergen declarations, and in particular, in-country labelling requirements (refer also 2.4.1). All current specifications for materials that could impact food safety and quality must be included on a register (list). 

 

The auditor will seek evidence of the existence and currency of material specifications and a procedure for developing and approving specifications at the desk audit. 

 

During the first and subsequent facility audits, the auditor will confirm compliance to this procedure; the material specification register and the process for checking compliance to specifications, validating specifications and ensuring relevant employees have access to current copies of specifications (refer also 2.2.1).  Evidence will be sought by interview, review of specifications and  record review, and may include:

•      Review of the procedure for developing and approving specifications;

•      Confirmation  that  the  register  of  raw  and  packaging  material  specifications  includes  all  on-site materials;

•      Review  of  a  selected  sample  of  material  specifications  to  confirm  agreement  with  relevant legislation;

•      Review  of  a  selected  sample  of  material  specifications,  in  particular  for  high  risk  materials,  to ensure potential factors impacting on product safety and quality are included;

•      Availability of current copies of specifications to relevant staff;

•      Interview of staff conducting validation activities;

•      Review of records of validation checks.

 

3.2   Food Contact Cleaning Compounds and Sanitizers

Cleaning compounds and sanitizers are considered chemicals under the Chemical Control Program

 

Critical Requirements

3.2.1.1          All cleaning compounds and sanitizers used to clean food contact surfaces have food contact approval documentation.

3.2.1.2          Sanitizer concentrations are tested to make sure they are consistent with the product label.

3.2.1.3          All cleaning chemicals are properly labeled.

3.2.1.4          All cleaning chemicals are stored in a secure compartment away from production and food storage areas when chemicals are not in use.

3.2.1.5          The facility follows verification procedures and maintains records of chemical concentration testing, retesting, and Corrective Actions.

3.2.1.6          Equipment is rinsed as required by label directions to remove chemical residues.

 

5.9   Chemical Control Program

A written Program for managing all chemicals in the facility provides a centralized approach to identifying and controlling purchase and use of nonfood chemicals.

       Critical Requirements

5.9.1.1          The facility has a written Chemical Control Program that addresses all chemicals used in the facility (e.g., chemicals for Integrated Pest Management, Maintenance, Sanitation, Hygiene, and Laboratories).

5.9.1.2          Procedures address, as applicable:

•  Chemical approval

•  Purchase authority

•  Controlled and segregated storage

•  Handling

•  Labels/Labeling

•  Identification of where and how the chemicals are to be used

•  Concentration verification

•  Training and education

•  Actual usage

•  Inventory control

•  Chemical disposal

•  Container disposal

•  Spill containment and control

•  Chemical Safety Data Sheet archiving

•  Contractor chemicals


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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#7 Andy_Yellows

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Posted 11 August 2016 - 06:56 AM

Thank you for this Charles, looks like exactly the information I've been looking for. I spent ages yesterday looking for something like this. Still learning on the job!

 

Regards,

 

Andy


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#8 LachelleOMP

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Posted 19 November 2018 - 02:43 AM

Thank you for the info!






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