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Using chlorine tablets to sanitize food contact surfaces

corrosive effect on metal

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#1 MDG

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Posted 25 August 2016 - 04:02 PM

Hello,

 

We are planning to use chlorine tablet (Sodium dichloroisocyanurate dehydrate) as a food contact surface sanitiser with concentration of 50ppm. Following help require for guidance :

 

a) Does it have any corrosive effect on stainless steel-304l and 316.

b) How it is different from Hypochlorite solution and Bleach

 

​Thank you in advance.

 

 



#2 Charles.C

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Posted 25 August 2016 - 04:22 PM

Hello,

 

We are planning to use chlorine tablet (Sodium dichloroisocyanurate dehydrate) as a food contact surface sanitiser with concentration of 50ppm. Following help require for guidance :

 

a) Does it have any corrosive effect on stainless steel-304l and 316.

b) How it is different from Hypochlorite solution and Bleach

 

​Thank you in advance.

 

(a) Maybe check the SDS documentation. Offhand, seems very unlikely for 316, 304 less sure but the concentrations used are likely to be minute, Yes ?

 

(b) It's available as a tablet.

And probably (a lot) more expensive.

 

I recall there are several old posts detailing its specific usage for fresh produce in the field. IIRC it has the typical pH control requirements for maximum sanitising. Maybe try a search for dichloro....


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#3 MDG

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Posted 28 August 2016 - 01:28 PM

Thank you



#4 redfox

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Posted 29 August 2016 - 12:50 PM

Hello MDG,

 

We are using that sanitizing agent but in powder form, we did not experience any corrosive effect on our stainless tables (FCS). Since it is rinsed with potable water no corrosion observed on our FCS.

 

 

regards,

redfox



#5 Mesha

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 12:04 PM

Hi MDG,

 

1) I presume that 50 ppm is the concentration of available chlorine from the tablet. This is a very low concentration to cause corrosion in 316. The corrosion will be evident in 304 faster than 316, that too after a long time. It depends a lot on your cleaning frequency also.

 

2) Except for difference in handling of hypochlorite and tablets, I don't see a major difference. Both of them will form Hypochlorous acid on dissolving in water.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Regards


Regards,

 


#6 Charles.C

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 09:41 PM

Hi MDG,

 

1) I presume that 50 ppm is the concentration of available chlorine from the tablet. This is a very low concentration to cause corrosion in 316. The corrosion will be evident in 304 faster than 316, that too after a long time. It depends a lot on your cleaning frequency also.

 

2) Except for difference in handling of hypochlorite and tablets, I don't see a major difference. Both of them will form Hypochlorous acid on dissolving in water.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Regards

 

Hi Mesha,

 

IMEX conc. solutions of sodium hypochorite (eg 10%) as typically available are very unpleasant to handle in bulk (eg 20L). And somewhat unstable. But they are also cheap.

Calcium hypochlorite powder is also extremely nasty in confined spaces and potentially "explosive". Hi-Grade Pellets are a bit better but expensive.

Crytalline formulations of other hypohalites also exist which are nice to handle (~odourless) but are very expensive.

But it's possible some other commercial hypohalite product exists which i haven't seen.

 

The isocyanurate sounds nice but i anticipate is not cheap. This old thread discusses its usage in the "field" -

http://www.ifsqn.com...ect-vegetables/


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C





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