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Milkshake guy here! :) preservatives needed

refrigeration frozen manufacturing preservatives shelf life milk shakes

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#1 Yudi123

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 07:07 AM

Hey guys...

 

I've begun a new business of producing and bottling milk products, such as milk with certain flavours (blueberry, chocolate, etc)

I'm kind of on testing grounds still, and since this is a home business, I dont have too much sophisticated machinery either.

 

However, my question: I'm planning on bottling these milk products and I'm hoping that they dont go bad for at least 10 days ( in the fridge.) Is there a certain way I should do it, should I add a certain preservative(name), and is this possible?

 

I made a few batches without any kind of preservatives, and it got spoilt after the 3rd day. Please HELP

 

 

Thanks !!



#2 GrumpyJimmy

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 03:09 PM

Hi Yudi123, you are entering one hell of a hard industry if your planning to do this from home. Id get the basics right first like equipment, cleaning, what types of packaging you will use ie whether you will fill in sterile conditions and into sterile packaging. Look at product in the market place and see if they use preservatives and i would imagine the very best tasting ones will have less shelf life and no preservatives. Others may have milk powder, water (less fat) and some milk and flavouring making it a the poor cousin of a great milkshake but may last longer. How much do you want to manufacturer in one day? how will you sell it? Where will you sell it? How will you store the ingredients? How will you store the end product? Every step can decrease or support life of a product. All questions that need to be answered. Every step and every ingredient makes a difference so relying just on a preservative is going to be a false economy in my humble opinion

 

cheers

DW



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#3 Scampi

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 07:26 PM

And are you starting with a pasteurised base? Are you pasteurising after?  I agree with daddywelsh....scary product to try on your own. Perhaps your better off trying to sell you idea and not the product????


Because we always have is never an appropriate response!


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#4 Yudi123

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Posted 02 June 2017 - 01:23 PM

Daddywelsh

 

Hi Yudi123, you are entering one hell of a hard industry if your planning to do this from home. Id get the basics right first like equipment, cleaning, what types of packaging you will use ie whether you will fill in sterile conditions and into sterile packaging. Look at product in the market place and see if they use preservatives and i would imagine the very best tasting ones will have less shelf life and no preservatives. Others may have milk powder, water (less fat) and some milk and flavouring making it a the poor cousin of a great milkshake but may last longer. How much do you want to manufacturer in one day? how will you sell it? Where will you sell it? How will you store the ingredients? How will you store the end product? Every step can decrease or support life of a product. All questions that need to be answered. Every step and every ingredient makes a difference so relying just on a preservative is going to be a false economy in my humble opinion

 

cheers

DW

Hi Daddywelsh,

Thanks a bunch for your information and thoughtful comments. There truly is a lot to think and ponder about before launching such a business, just like you mentioned. Yes, I did check on the ingredients on some other products already in the market, and they don't seem to have any preservatives, although they do have the milk powder stuff like you've said. The selling outlets I've already decided, and the packaging method has already been addressed. But I'm just wondering how I can at least keep this item for a few days without it getting spoilt.

 

Thanks once again mate!



#5 Yudi123

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Posted 02 June 2017 - 01:27 PM

And are you starting with a pasteurised base? Are you pasteurising after?  I agree with daddywelsh....scary product to try on your own. Perhaps your better off trying to sell you idea and not the product????

 

And are you starting with a pasteurised base? Are you pasteurising after?  I agree with daddywelsh....scary product to try on your own. Perhaps your better off trying to sell you idea and not the product????

Hi Scampi,

 

Thanks for your reply. Basically I'm using already pasteurized milk from the store (wholesale), and mixing in a few ingredients (flavours, etc) and then re packing it in my own packaging (tight seal hard plastic bottles.) I do agree that its a pretty scary venture, But I would love to try it at at least and see. Your knowledge on any methods of keeping it preserved for at least a few days is greatly appreciated..

 

Thanks once again..



#6 GrumpyJimmy

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Posted 02 June 2017 - 01:47 PM

Daddywelsh

 

Hi Daddywelsh,

Thanks a bunch for your information and thoughtful comments. There truly is a lot to think and ponder about before launching such a business, just like you mentioned. Yes, I did check on the ingredients on some other products already in the market, and they don't seem to have any preservatives, although they do have the milk powder stuff like you've said. The selling outlets I've already decided, and the packaging method has already been addressed. But I'm just wondering how I can at least keep this item for a few days without it getting spoilt.

 

Thanks once again mate!

Hi Yudi, all i can suggest is reducing fat, using milk powder to maybe keep more of a milky taste and filling in sterile conditions and sterile packaging. I cant see any specific types of preservatives and rather than spending too much time looking at that, i would look at manufacturing and supplying in conditions that do not support growth of spoiling bacteria. In my experience there is no secret apart from good science and procedures to help the cause.

There may be others on IFSQN with specifics in ingredients but for me thats all i can offer sorry

 

Cheers

DW



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#7 Yudi123

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Posted 02 June 2017 - 02:07 PM

Hi Yudi, all i can suggest is reducing fat, using milk powder to maybe keep more of a milky taste and filling in sterile conditions and sterile packaging. I cant see any specific types of preservatives and rather than spending too much time looking at that, i would look at manufacturing and supplying in conditions that do not support growth of spoiling bacteria. In my experience there is no secret apart from good science and procedures to help the cause.

There may be others on IFSQN with specifics in ingredients but for me thats all i can offer sorry

 

Cheers

DW

Hi Daddywelsh,

Thanks so much.. Your suggestions and input are greatly valued, and I will definitely keep these in mind when trying out the formula. Let's see how it goes, and I will definitely keep you updated on the progress.

 

Truly appreciate..



#8 FurFarmandFork

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Posted 02 June 2017 - 03:35 PM

I'd honestly recommend pasteurizing again after you add your ingredients. It looks like that's the process flow for commercial flavored milks per this dairy blog:

http://dairy-technol...oured-milk.html

 

Make sure you get your heating/cooling temps correct and develop a valid CIP program. I'm sure you're introducing "seed organisms" from your non-sterile ingredients that are spoiling your product as well as your (probably large open container) mixing method.

 

Mix all ingredients>pasteurize again>fill sterile containers and seal.


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Consulting for companies needing effective, lean food safety systems and solutions.

Subscribe to the blog at furfarmandfork.com for food safety research, insights, and analysis.

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#9 Ryan M.

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 11:52 PM

If you are in the US you have a lot of regulatory to contend with.  The US Milk industry is one of the most heavily regulated.  There is a guidance document known as the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance.  Latest revision is 2015 with revision 2017 to be published sometime early next year.

 

https://www.fda.gov/...k/ucm513508.pdf

 

At any rate, one of the regulatory stipulations would require you to re-pasteurize the milk regardless if it is already pasteurized or not because you are considered a "processor" and "packager" of milk products.  The other stipulation you need to understand is standard of identity.  Milk products have a standard of identity.

 

http://milkfacts.inf...of Identity.htm

 

If you are doing flavored fluid, drinkable milk, then you cannot add preservatives to it.

 

Also, there are differences in requirements between Federal milk and California milk.  I don't know where you are located (if within the US), but if you are in California or plan to distribute to California you will need to understand those differences.  

 

https://www.cdfa.ca....ry_food_safety/

 

Good luck in developing this on your own.  However, I can tell you from my experience people who are in your shoes typically look for someone to co-pack their products for them.  I'm not trying to sell you on anything, but our fluid dairy plant only does co-packing and we assist with R&D development through commercialization for new products.  If interested you can drop me a line.  If not, no worries...I'll help you where I can.



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#10 Charles.C

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Posted 07 June 2017 - 03:06 AM

Hi Yudi,

 

The previous post echoed my own thoughts.

 

In yr (unknown) local environment are you legally allowed to simply start up a proposed bottling business such as you describe and directly sell to the general public ?


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#11 Yudi123

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Posted 17 June 2017 - 10:05 AM

I'd honestly recommend pasteurizing again after you add your ingredients. It looks like that's the process flow for commercial flavored milks per this dairy blog:

http://dairy-technol...oured-milk.html

 

Make sure you get your heating/cooling temps correct and develop a valid CIP program. I'm sure you're introducing "seed organisms" from your non-sterile ingredients that are spoiling your product as well as your (probably large open container) mixing method.

 

Mix all ingredients>pasteurize again>fill sterile containers and seal.

Hi FurFarmandFork,

Thanks for your replies and suggestions. Yes, the blog helps a lot and it seems like this method should be a lot better than what I've tried.

Really appreciate your feedback and thoughts, along with that nice formula you've put up :)



#12 Yudi123

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Posted 17 June 2017 - 10:07 AM

If you are in the US you have a lot of regulatory to contend with.  The US Milk industry is one of the most heavily regulated.  There is a guidance document known as the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance.  Latest revision is 2015 with revision 2017 to be published sometime early next year.

 

https://www.fda.gov/...k/ucm513508.pdf

 

At any rate, one of the regulatory stipulations would require you to re-pasteurize the milk regardless if it is already pasteurized or not because you are considered a "processor" and "packager" of milk products.  The other stipulation you need to understand is standard of identity.  Milk products have a standard of identity.

 

http://milkfacts.inf...of Identity.htm

 

If you are doing flavored fluid, drinkable milk, then you cannot add preservatives to it.

 

Also, there are differences in requirements between Federal milk and California milk.  I don't know where you are located (if within the US), but if you are in California or plan to distribute to California you will need to understand those differences.  

 

https://www.cdfa.ca....ry_food_safety/

 

Good luck in developing this on your own.  However, I can tell you from my experience people who are in your shoes typically look for someone to co-pack their products for them.  I'm not trying to sell you on anything, but our fluid dairy plant only does co-packing and we assist with R&D development through commercialization for new products.  If interested you can drop me a line.  If not, no worries...I'll help you where I can.

HI Ryan,

I will absolutely get back to you if this is the case. And thanks so much for your helpful and informative links, which are truly useful to my business. Ever since I've gotten on this platform, I've been educated by amazing people like yourself. Thanks once again..!



#13 QAGB

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 05:15 PM

Hi Yudi,

 

The previous post echoed my own thoughts.

 

In yr (unknown) local environment are you legally allowed to simply start up a proposed bottling business such as you describe and directly sell to the general public ?

 

The question posed by Charles is exactly what I was thinking as well. I know in my area, the Dept. of Agriculture is heavily involved in bottling of milk; especially farm-based operations. I'd imagine this process would have to be certified by some sort of regulatory body before being able to sell to the general public.

 

QAGB



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#14 Timothy Wilson

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 09:24 PM

Hi there!

It is a good idea. I have one recommendation for you.

Maybe you can try to do milkshakes without a blender?

You can read how to make a chocolate milkshake without a blender here :sleazy:

Enjoy your meal!







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