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Ingredient Hazards


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#1 asaeger

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Posted 02 November 2017 - 08:18 PM

For our Food Safety Plan, we were told by a professor that teaches the PCQI course that if you receive a COA for an ingredient then you must identify the possible hazards as whatever micro the customer is providing you the

COA testing for. Our ingredients are all low risk.  For example:  If we get a release agent and the COA tests for TPC and yeast and mold, then we need to identify that as a potential hazard.  Is this true?



#2 Charles.C

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Posted 03 November 2017 - 01:44 AM

For our Food Safety Plan, we were told by a professor that teaches the PCQI course that if you receive a COA for an ingredient then you must identify the possible hazards as whatever micro the customer is providing you the

COA testing for. Our ingredients are all low risk.  For example:  If we get a release agent and the COA tests for TPC and yeast and mold, then we need to identify that as a potential hazard.  Is this true?

 

Hi asaeger,

 

I suggest perhaps a new Professor.

 

I very much doubt that yeast will be a potential haccp safety hazard.

 

IMO. generically, safety hazards are derived from a risk assessment.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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#3 Madam A. D-tor

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Posted 27 November 2017 - 10:24 PM

Dear aseager,

 

I believe it is the other way around.

You and/ or your supplier (based on scientifically and legal requirements) determines the risk for the product. This can be food safety, but might also be involved to your processes. E.g. salt in an ingredient, colour or moisture of an ingredient. Parameters should be agreed.

Then the supplier can release the product (your raw material) to you based on the certificates of analyses and providing you the certificates of analyses  as proof.


Kind Regards,

Madam A. D-tor




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