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Pest Control Trend Tracking


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#1 bretterin

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 04:50 PM

Is it considered a trend If we are always finding evidence of field mice in the outdoor rodent bait stations?  If the answer is yes, then what is our corrective action and preventative measure?  I ask because we expect activity in these stations.  We add bait to the stations to attract the rodents so they ingest it and die.  The problem is that the field mouse population around the plant continually grows due to the nearby field, so we cannot prevent a reoccurence.  Can anyone add some insight?

 

 

 

 



#2 Gerard H.

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 08:14 PM

Dear Bretterin,

 

Yes, you can consider it as a trend. When you find evidence, you need to carry out a root cause analyses. There may be a reason, why the rodent is there, for example:

  • They find food around
  • There is an access to the building, close to the bait point
  • The space nearby the building serves as a shelter

Depending on the cause, you can take your preventive measures.

 

We can unfortunately not assume that the mouse is killed by the poison. They need to eat it several times in a short period. And in general they can find other food outside.

 

Note: Field mice tend to stay outside. The mice inside buildings is the "house mouse". You can also put a trap in the bait station, where you always find evidence. Then you can really see, which species is eating the poison.

 

So there is a lot to say, about your questions, even not knowing the exact context. I hope it gives you some ideas to proceed.

 

Kind regards,

 

Gerard Heerkens



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#3 Madam A. D-tor

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Posted 07 December 2017 - 01:48 PM

Dear Bretterin,

 

As long as you only find activity in the outside baits and not on the inside baits, you can conclude that your pest control measures are adequate.

 

If the rodents come from a nearby field, there is not much else to do than prevent that they enter your premises (take care if the weather is getting colder).

Make sure there are no nesting places on your outside terrains. No waste, no food, no pallets, no crates or other materials stored outside.

 

By the way, it is prohibited in the Netherlands to use poison in outside baits. This can build op in the food chain of predators and finally killing animals that are protected. You can consider this if your area habitats unique animals.


Kind Regards,

Madam A. D-tor

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#4 bretterin

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Posted 07 December 2017 - 02:01 PM

Thanks Madam.  I am also in the meat industry, and we are highly regulated by USDA.(United States Department of Agriculture), SQF, and some of our larger customers.  I need some type of support as to why this is not considered a trend, and I think you provided it.



#5 daveh11

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 08:51 AM

Dear Bretterin

 

We have a similar issue, limited rodent activity to the external / directly inside doorways etc, rather than trend analysis, we took the proofing approach, where regular audits are conducted by a small team, each allocated a rolling schedule where they conduct work place inspections within the workplace and submit recommended proofing ideas –

  • Repairs to door carcasses where gaps are evident.
  • Self closing door mechanisms
  • removal of vegetation around the perimeter
  • Replacement screens on doors and opening windows

All aimed at keeping the issue to the outside of the building, all the recommendations are entered onto an action list and periodically progressed. 

 

Hope this helps

 

David



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