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Food Fraud and Allergen Assessment

Food Fraud and Allergen

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#1 shoultzk

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Posted 16 January 2018 - 10:25 PM

Good afternoon everyone. I am new on here. It's good to know I am not the only one out there that doesn't get all of the Allergens and Food Fraud sections of the code version 8.  I have done a lot of research on allergen and run into a lot of nothing. Lol. We product dog treats mainly using poultry. We will be starting more proteins this year, 2018, but for now poultry. One ingredient we do use is dried egg. There is controversy of this ingredient actually being an allergen. If you read on the ingredient and how it is made it states; 

 

"glucose is removed from liquid egg white prior to drying by fermentation using a yeast or bacterial culture, or by oxidation to gluconic acid using a glucose oxidase-catalase enzyme system. With glucose removed, dried egg whites are completely stable."

 

So at this point, still an allergen? If yes, why? The protein itself? 

 

As far as lubricants, JAX food grade is what is used in the plant? How is this an allergen? 

 

Food Fraud.... we are a small plant of 35 people, and that includes management team. If there was food fraud it would be coming from the suppliers. How do you prove or disprove that?

I took the Food Vulnerability Assessment. Some of those questions.... no idea. 

 

Kasie



#2 Charles.C

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Posted 16 January 2018 - 10:53 PM

Good afternoon everyone. I am new on here. It's good to know I am not the only one out there that doesn't get all of the Allergens and Food Fraud sections of the code version 8.  I have done a lot of research on allergen and run into a lot of nothing. Lol. We product dog treats mainly using poultry. We will be starting more proteins this year, 2018, but for now poultry. One ingredient we do use is dried egg. There is controversy of this ingredient actually being an allergen. If you read on the ingredient and how it is made it states; 

 

"glucose is removed from liquid egg white prior to drying by fermentation using a yeast or bacterial culture, or by oxidation to gluconic acid using a glucose oxidase-catalase enzyme system. With glucose removed, dried egg whites are completely stable."

 

So at this point, still an allergen? If yes, why? The protein itself? 

Presumably yes, see -

https://www.mayoclin...es/syc-20372115

What does the label say ?

 

As far as lubricants, JAX food grade is what is used in the plant? How is this an allergen? 

Yes or no depends on what's in it ?

What does the label say ?

 

Food Fraud.... we are a small plant of 35 people, and that includes management team. If there was food fraud it would be coming from the suppliers. How do you prove or disprove that?

I took the Food Vulnerability Assessment. Some of those questions.... no idea. 

Which course / questions are you referring to ? SSafe ?

 

Kasie

 

Hi Kasie,

 

See ^^^^^^


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#3 FurFarmandFork

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 04:21 PM

Glucose removed egg is still egg, and egg is an allergen. The glucose isn't the problem the egg itself is. That's kind of like saying you bought skim milk instead of whole milk, the allergen is milk, the fat content is irrelevant.

 

FYI, I know your pet food products may not be subject to the same labeling requirements, but be aware that FDA and FSIS have mandatory labeling requirements when glucose removed egg products are used.

 

An explanation of the glucose removal process as well as the labeling requirements can be found here: https://www.accessda....cfm?fr=160.105

 

 

 

Sec. 160.105 Dried eggs.

(a) Dried eggs, dried whole eggs are prepared by drying liquid eggs that conform to 160.115, with such precautions that the finished food is free of viable Salmonella microorganisms. They may be powdered. Before drying, the glucose content of the liquid eggs may be reduced by one of the optional procedures set forth in paragraph (b) of this section. Either silicon dioxide complying with the provisions of 172.480 of this chapter or sodium silicoaluminate may be added as an optional anticaking ingredient, but the amount of silicon dioxide used is not more than 1 percent and the amount of sodium silicoaluminate used is less than 2 percent by weight of the finished food. The finished food shall contain not less than 95 percent by weight total egg solids.

(b) The optional glucose-removing procedures are:

(1) Enzyme procedure. A glucose-oxidase-catalase preparation and hydrogen peroxide solution are added to the liquid eggs. The quantity used and the time of reaction are sufficient to substantially reduce the glucose content of the liquid eggs. The glucose-oxidase-catalase preparation used is one that is generally recognized as safe within the meaning of section 201(s) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. The hydrogen peroxide solution used shall comply with the specifications of the United States Pharmacopeia, except that it may exceed the concentration specified therein and it does not contain a preservative.

(2) Yeast procedure. The pH of the liquid eggs is adjusted to the range of 6.0 to 7.0, if necessary, by the addition of dilute, chemically pure hydrochloric acid, and controlled fermentation is maintained by adding food-grade baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae ). The quantity of yeast used and the time of reaction are sufficient to substantially reduce the glucose content of the liquid eggs.

© The name of the food for which a definition and standard of identity is prescribed by this section is "Dried eggs" or "Dried whole eggs" and if the glucose content was reduced, as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the name shall be followed immediately by the statement "Glucose removed for stability" or "Stabilized, glucose removed".

(d)(1) When either of the optional anticaking ingredients specified in paragraph (a) of this section is used, the label shall bear the statement "Not more than 1 percent silicon dioxide added as an anticaking agent" or "Less than 2 percent sodium silicoaluminate added as an anticaking agent", whichever is applicable.

(2) The name of any optional ingredient used, as provided in paragraph (d)(1) of this section, shall be listed on the principal display panel or panels of the label with such prominence and conspicuousness as to render such statement likely to be read and understood by the ordinary individual under customary conditions of purchase.

(e) Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter.


Austin Bouck
Owner/Consultant at Fur, Farm, and Fork.
Consulting for companies needing effective, lean food safety systems and solutions.

Subscribe to the blog at furfarmandfork.com for food safety research, insights, and analysis.

#4 shoultzk

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 06:57 PM

As far as lubricants, JAX food grade is what is used in the plant? How is this an allergen? 

Yes or no depends on what's in it ?

What does the label say ?

 

I have printed the SDS's for the food grade JAX we have in the plant. I guess I don't know what I am looking for on the label. I don't know how far I need to go to make sure I am covered. 

 

 

 

Food Fraud.... we are a small plant of 35 people, and that includes management team. If there was food fraud it would be coming from the suppliers. How do you prove or disprove that?

I took the Food Vulnerability Assessment. Some of those questions.... no idea. 

Which course / questions are you referring to ? SSafe ?

 

Yes, I am referring to SSafe/PwC. I've only been in the manufacturing business for 3.5 years, so answering some of the questions asked was brutal. 



#5 Charles.C

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 01:03 PM

 

As far as lubricants, JAX food grade is what is used in the plant? How is this an allergen? 

Yes or no depends on what's in it ?

What does the label say ?

 

I have printed the SDS's for the food grade JAX we have in the plant. I guess I don't know what I am looking for on the label. I don't know how far I need to go to make sure I am covered. 

Some possible solutions (particularly that of SpursGirl IMO) are in this thread - 

http://www.ifsqn.com/forum/index.php/topic/24813-allergen-risk-analysis-for-food-grade-lubricants/

-----------------------------------------------------------

Food Fraud.... we are a small plant of 35 people, and that includes management team. If there was food fraud it would be coming from the suppliers. How do you prove or disprove that?

I took the Food Vulnerability Assessment. Some of those questions.... no idea. 

Which course / questions are you referring to ? SSafe ?

 

Yes, I am referring to SSafe/PwC. I've only been in the manufacturing business for 3.5 years, so answering some of the questions asked was brutal. 

Yes, there have been comments regarding the quantity of queries involved in SSafe.

There are other, probably less voluminous, methodologies for VA posted on this forum of course (originally developed for VA/BRC).

------------------------------------------------------------------------


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#6 dfreund

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 02:20 PM

The University of Nebraska at Lincoln is a foundational source of information and training in allergens.  They operate (in conjunction) with FARRP.

Allergen Control in the Food Industry | Food Allergy Research and Resource Program | University of Nebraska–Lincoln






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