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Best approach to walls and floors with peeling paint?


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#1 Parkz58

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Posted 24 April 2018 - 07:59 PM

Greetings,

 

We have an older plant, with a concrete floor and concrete block construction.

 

The interior walls were painted a long time ago, and now it is peeling.  We know we need to do something...we're just not sure what the best approach would be.

 

My boss has a friend in the food industry who recently visited a plant where they had NO paint...bare walls, even unpainted equipment!  That seemed strange to me...

 

The interior walls are somewhat porous...the concrete block was not skim-coated or anything, so it has the normal pits and crevices.  I don't think it would be considered adequate to leave it unpainted or uncoated in some way...but what would work best?

 

We want something that will not require maintenance...or, at least, minimal maintenance.  If possible, it could even be the same thing we could put on our floor (though we don't know if we really need to do the floor...it's smooth, no cracks that I know of at this time).

 

Any thoughts?  Suggestions?  Products/processes to avoid?

 

Thanks!

 

Brian



#2 FurFarmandFork

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Posted 25 April 2018 - 03:04 PM

I would think you could put a polyurethane coat on cinder block in the same way you could on a concrete floor? Impervious to moisture and handles forklift and equipment abuse on the floor, so likely would last forever on a wall.

 

I'd worry about just paint on the blocks unless it's on there pretty thick, they can be so fragile that you end up with it looking bad/flaking off.

 

If your facility is super dry (I think you do grains?) Then you may not necessarily have to put anything on them, but you're going to want to sand off the flaking paint.


Austin Bouck
Owner/Consultant at Fur, Farm, and Fork.
Consulting for companies needing effective, lean food safety systems and solutions.

Subscribe to the blog at furfarmandfork.com for food safety research, insights, and analysis.

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#3 Parkz58

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Posted 25 April 2018 - 04:10 PM

Thanks FFF,

 

Yes, we're a grain processing facility.  I was actually contemplating shutting down production to sandblast the old paint off the walls, which would also help smooth out the walls, too...then the question would be whether we leave the walls bare (likely fine for FSMA, but I'm not sure it would pass muster if/when we decide to go GFSI?), or just go ahead and coat the walls now while we've got everything shut down and torn apart (any suggestions on brands/types of polyurethane that would work for both walls and floor in a facility that has temperature shifts the same as ambient outside weather in Minnesota?).

 

Must to contemplate...anyone else have any thoughts or experience as well, to throw into the mix?



#4 Pacamara

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Posted 27 April 2018 - 07:23 PM

I agree with the above.  Get rid of the paint.  Do a micro validation study on the bare walls .  Is there an issue from a bacterial / mold / fungal perspective.  If there isn't - you caould use the study as evidence to an auditor that the bare walls are OK.  Physical contamination issue would be via regular monitoring for things like webs, dirt build-up, damage.  Chemical contamination you would need to asses and monitor as well.  Chemical issues can be sealed behind a coating if needed.



#5 Parkz58

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Posted 27 April 2018 - 07:55 PM

Pacamara,

 

We're a grain processing plant for animal food (not food-grade)...don't you think a micro validation study is a bit overboard?  My boss would never pay for that to get done...



#6 Scampi

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Posted 30 April 2018 - 02:43 PM

3.2.3.1 Walls, partitions, ceilings and doors shall be of durable construction. Internal surfaces shall be
impervious and shall be kept clean (refer to 3.2.13.1).  SQF animal food production
 
The only sticking point might be that bare cinder block is not actually impervious.....but in your dry facility it's a moot point and could effectively be argued with an auditor.
 
I think you're idea of a shut down to sand blast is a good idea......have you looked at dry ice? It may be an easier, less messy clean up

Because we always have is never an appropriate response!


#7 redfox

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Posted 03 May 2018 - 05:07 AM

Hello,

 

I suggest a liquid tile on the wall and a traffic paint on the floor. 

 

 

regards,

redfox






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