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#1 kfromNE

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Posted 01 June 2018 - 06:41 PM

We use a chlorinated manual cleaner to clean some of our equipment. The technical directions say to use warm water. My chemical representative gave me a temperature range of 155-165 F.

My question - are there any studies or scientific papers that can verify how temperatures effect or don't effect cleaners. My other concern is that I've seen temperatures out of the range of 155-165F on our productions sheets (before I got there). I would like to be able to justify this. 

 

If anyone could point me in the right direction, I would appreciate it.



#2 Scampi

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Posted 01 June 2018 - 06:56 PM

Here's some information

http://www.cleanlink...tiveness--41091

https://chemistry.st...ter-in-cleaning.

https://rhinocommerc...ffects-results/

 

AFAIK you can replace temperature with a combination of manual scrubbing and contact time and achieve similar results, but you'd need to swab post rinse/pre sanitizer to be sure


Please stop referring to me as Sir/sirs


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#3 Gerard H.

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Posted 04 June 2018 - 08:14 AM

Dear K,

 

For manual cleaning, the temperature range of 155-165 F is quite high, because of the risk of burning. And scrubbing isn't possible at such temperatures, as mentioned above.

 

The high temperature may cause caking of the dirt, which is an undesired side-effect.

 

It seems, you use a combination agent (cleaning and disinfection) = 1 step cleaning & disinfection. The effectivity of such needs to be studied, because the chlorine part isn't effective when the equipment is dirty.

 

Another remark is that the chlorine may damage parts of your machinery, you will first remark it on the parts that aren't from stainless steel.  

 

Of course, what I wrote is not to criticise the way you work, but just some constructive points to help you to improve your cleaning process!

 

Kind regards,

 

Gerard Heerkens



#4 Charles.C

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Posted 04 June 2018 - 01:49 PM

We use a chlorinated manual cleaner to clean some of our equipment. The technical directions say to use warm water. My chemical representative gave me a temperature range of 155-165 F.

My question - are there any studies or scientific papers that can verify how temperatures effect or don't effect cleaners. My other concern is that I've seen temperatures out of the range of 155-165F on our productions sheets (before I got there). I would like to be able to justify this. 

 

If anyone could point me in the right direction, I would appreciate it.

 

Some context might help.

 

It likely may depend on what you are cleaning and with precisely what cleaner, and How  ?? "Chlorine" does not specifically clean.

 

What is yr environmental temperature ?

 

What does the documentation for yr cleaner say ?

 

@ Chemical Representatives - Trust but Verify !.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#5 kfromNE

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Posted 04 June 2018 - 04:04 PM

Some context might help. 

 

It likely may depend on what you are cleaning and with precisely what cleaner, and How  ?? "Chlorine" does not specifically clean.

 

What is yr environmental temperature ?

 

What does the documentation for yr cleaner say ?

 

@ Chemical Representatives - Trust but Verify !.

 

What: After manually cleaning them first, removable stainless steel parts of the machine are put into a COP tank for the allotted amount of time. Rinsed with cold water then sanitized

 

The cleaner composition: alkaline builders, blend of phosphates, chlorine compound and surfactants



#6 Charles.C

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Posted 04 June 2018 - 04:53 PM

What: After manually cleaning them first, removable stainless steel parts of the machine are put into a COP tank for the allotted amount of time. Rinsed with cold water then sanitized

 

The cleaner composition: alkaline builders, blend of phosphates, chlorine compound and surfactants

 

Hi kfromia,

 

Ths for info.

 

I assume Chemical X is used for 1st step above. The presence of a "chlorine-chemical" seems redundant.

 

My "what" query also related to how dirty the parts are. If only marginal, likely no need for high temperatures. And particularly if a non-cold environment. Also relates to whether a HP "gun" is available, eg 100psig.

 

One option is to test the cleaner first for visual acceptability then, if OK, check the bacteriological condition.

 

 

Did Chemical X have application documentation ? It should have. Suggested temperature of Use ?


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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