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Food Safety Plan- Seeking Ingredient Hazards

HACCP HARCP FSP

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#1 lesliee1243

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 06:19 PM

Hello there,

 

I am new to the food safety industry. I work for a very small manufacturer, who specialize in making formed frozen bread rolls, Hispanic Rolls to be exact. I recently took a PCQI Course. I am working on developing a FSP alone for our small bakery. We use the following ingredients in our rolls, i am having trouble identifying hazards on some ingridients. this is what i have so far, please provide any input on anything i should add.

 

 

Flour- possible hazards - BIOLOGICAL, ECOLI, SALMONELLA- CCP is BAKING

 

Soybean OIl- possible hazards- NONE

 

Vegetable Shortening- possible hazards- NONE

 

GRAN SUGAR- possible hazards- Chemical, pesticides

 

SALT- possible hazrds- NONE

 

DOH CON- possible hazards- NONE

 

WATER (Municipal water)- possible hazards- BIOLOGICAL- prevantative control is- Yearly testing

 

YEAST DRY - possible hazards- NONE

 

Also, any advice for this first time solo writer for the FSP would be greatly appreciated

 

Thank you,

Leslie Martinez



#2 jdpaul

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 06:43 PM

SALT

Microbiological: Halophilic organisms. Preventive control: Supplier approval program, Certificate of Analysis, etc

Justification: evaporation of water, inactivating halophilic activity.

Chemical: Heavy metals, e.g., magnesium Preventive control: Supplier approval program, Certificate of Analysis, etc

Justification: similar to that for physical.

Physical: debris such as wood, plastic, or metal. Preventive control: Supplier approval program, Certificate of Analysis, etc

Justification: Production of (assuming brined salt vs. rock salt) includes refining processes such as heating evaporation for purity of NaCl, screens to sift other materials and eliminate contamination from production environment.

 

I would do the same for the others.

 

Water would also include

 

Chemical; heavy metals, lead, iron. Nitrates, volatile organic compounds, etc. Preventive control: Municipal water quality report. Effluent/influent reports. Annual water testing

Justification: (look at chemical outbreaks in the past 10 years). Plus the likelihood is low for this because the strict requirements for processing of potable water to the public


Edited by jdpaul, 20 June 2018 - 06:57 PM.


#3 Scampi

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 07:52 PM

You may find this useful

 

http://www.inspectio...9/1384900941583

 

It lists hazards by process,ingredient and step

 

I would also ensure your testing water more than 1/year

 

I recommend you spend alot of time on the hazard analysis. The rest will fall into place, but this is the step where things get missed


Because we always have is never an appropriate response!


#4 Scampi

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 07:55 PM

Not sure what just happened there, but here's what I wanted to say

 

Spend as much time as you can on the hazard analysis, this is the step where things get missed and you get into trouble

 

http://active.inspec...arece.aspx?i=11

Above is a great database of hazards, for ingredients and processing steps

 

Have your water tested more than 1/year to be safe monthly or every other month depending


Because we always have is never an appropriate response!


#5 jdpaul

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 08:03 PM

Oh yes, Scampi is right on the routine sampling. I assume your annual testing is a full battery of testing for metals, pesticides, THMs, etc

 

you should probably do monthly testing for total coliforms and e. coli



#6 mgourley

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 09:55 PM

If you are subject to FDA's PCHF rule, they will expect you to use this guidance document as a minimum. 

 

Also, what is DOH CON? What is it's composition? You have to assess all of the component parts of any blends. If DO CON contains flour as one of the ingredients, then you have to assess it as if it is flour (in addition to any other ingredients that are in it).

 

Marshall


Edited by mgourley, 20 June 2018 - 09:59 PM.


#7 mgourley

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 10:06 PM

SALT

Microbiological: Halophilic organisms. Preventive control: Supplier approval program, Certificate of Analysis, etc

Justification: evaporation of water, inactivating halophilic activity.

Chemical: Heavy metals, e.g., magnesium Preventive control: Supplier approval program, Certificate of Analysis, etc

Justification: similar to that for physical.

Physical: debris such as wood, plastic, or metal. Preventive control: Supplier approval program, Certificate of Analysis, etc

Justification: Production of (assuming brined salt vs. rock salt) includes refining processes such as heating evaporation for purity of NaCl, screens to sift other materials and eliminate contamination from production environment.

 

I would do the same for the others.

 

Water would also include

 

Chemical; heavy metals, lead, iron. Nitrates, volatile organic compounds, etc. Preventive control: Municipal water quality report. Effluent/influent reports. Annual water testing

Justification: (look at chemical outbreaks in the past 10 years). Plus the likelihood is low for this because the strict requirements for processing of potable water to the public

jdpaul,

 

Although it did not come up in our recent FDA "FSMA Compliance Audit", I would guess that a preventive control of a water quality report from the Municipal source would not "scientifically" be accepted. The vast majority of those reports are generally a year behind or more.

 

Marshall



#8 Charles.C

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Posted 21 June 2018 - 09:06 AM

Hi Leslie,

 

With respect to the specific items in yr OP I suggest you first start with freely accessible  direct compilations of specific hazard vs ingredient data. A few candidates are  -

 

(1) The (hazard compilation) document in Post 6 link.

Attached File  ref 1 - USA - Appendix1- Potential Hazards for Foods and Processes, 2018.pdf   1.9MB   175 downloads

(2) the CFIA (hazard database) document attached here -

http://www.ifsqn.com...lt/#entry115210

Attached File  ref 2 - Canada - Hazard DataBase 2008.pdf   1.15MB   104 downloads

(3) the UK document (micro specifications only) attached here -

http://www.ifsqn.com...ds/#entry125445

Attached File  ref 3a - micro. specs RTE foods, UK-PHLS,2000.pdf   138.57KB   108 downloads

Attached File  ref 3b - micro.spcs RTE foods ,UK-HPA, 2009.pdf   998.98KB   102 downloads

(the earlier (3a) contained APC data, the later one not)

(4) the ICMSF document (micro specifications only) attached here -

http://www.ifsqn.com...es/#entry118700

Attached File  ref 4 - micro specs Raw and RTE foods,icmsf 2, pt2, 1986.pdf   802.97KB   114 downloads

(5) this ICMSF document (micro specifications only) -

Attached File  ref 5 - ICMSF compilation food micro.criteria.pdf   2.59MB   114 downloads

(6) this EC document (micro specifications only) -

Attached File  ref 6 - EC microbiological criteria 2073-2005.pdf   855.2KB   111 downloads

 

If above not useful, some direct googling for published Specifications for the specific items will often reveal the typical hazards/limits.

 

There are other excellent Book Compilations referenced in this Forum but they are not free. I daresay standard Baking texts will also have relevant data but unfortunately not my area of expertise.

 

PS - municipal water will presumably have no hazards (by definition) if conforming to local regulatory standard (whatever that is) or perhaps to regs of destination if product to be exported.

 

PPS - if the ingredients are Food Grade, then it can be assumed there are no Significant Hazards


Edited by Charles.C, 12 July 2018 - 10:31 PM.
ref. files (1-4) added

Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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#9 lesliee1243

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Posted 21 June 2018 - 01:49 PM

Hello,

 

To answer some questions, DOH COND is Dough Conditioner, and does have flour in it actually, it is a mix of Flour, diacetyl tartaric acid, esters of mono-and diglycerides, soybean oil, l. cystenin, enzyme, ascorbic acid, azodicarbonamide



#10 jdpaul

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Posted 21 June 2018 - 01:58 PM

This may help you for soybean oil

 

http://fic.nfi.or.th...oil-Nov2012.pdf



#11 Charles.C

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Posted 21 June 2018 - 02:25 PM

This may help you for soybean oil

 

http://fic.nfi.or.th...oil-Nov2012.pdf

Thks.

 

Assuming refined Food Grade, IIRC, Safety Hazards = Nil

 

As a corollary to Post 6, I predict that DOH CON will not exist in any ingredient hazard compilations as a single item.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#12 jdpaul

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Posted 21 June 2018 - 02:49 PM

Here is a great resource for the yeast:

 

edit: I included the codex stan for sugar

Attached Files


Edited by jdpaul, 21 June 2018 - 02:53 PM.


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#13 mgourley

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Posted 21 June 2018 - 04:43 PM

Hello,

 

To answer some questions, DOH COND is Dough Conditioner, and does have flour in it actually, it is a mix of Flour, diacetyl tartaric acid, esters of mono-and diglycerides, soybean oil, l. cystenin, enzyme, ascorbic acid, azodicarbonamide

 

So it's DATEM. Salmonella and E. Coli are possible biological hazards.

 

Marshall



#14 bluannie

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Posted 22 June 2018 - 12:20 PM

Hello,

FLOUR

chemical hazard: mycotoxins like Alfatoxin produced by Aspergillus species, Ochratoxin A (in rye flour) procuced by Aspergillus and Penicilium, Deoxynivalenol produced by Fusarium species etc.

biological hazard: amylolytic bacteria that are able to hydrolize starch (ie. Bacillus spp) also

physical hazard: death and alive pests like mites,insects - grain wefts etc. and its larvae, also rodents hair (in flour sacks)

 

Annie



#15 jdpaul

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Posted 22 June 2018 - 12:44 PM

Hello,

FLOUR

chemical hazard: mycotoxins like Alfatoxin produced by Aspergillus species, Ochratoxin A (in rye flour) procuced by Aspergillus and Penicilium, Deoxynivalenol produced by Fusarium species etc.

biological hazard: amylolytic bacteria that are able to hydrolize starch (ie. Bacillus spp) also

physical hazard: death and alive pests like mites,insects - grain wefts etc. and its larvae, also rodents hair (in flour sacks)

 

Annie

Oh yes! The famed flour beetle infestation in the silo



#16 Fishlady

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Posted 24 June 2018 - 03:31 AM

You should also include the chemical hazard of allergens: wheat in the flour, soy in the soybean oil (if it is not highly refined), and any that may be in the subcomponents of the vegetable shortening.



#17 jdpaul

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Posted 25 June 2018 - 08:45 PM

jdpaul,

 

Although it did not come up in our recent FDA "FSMA Compliance Audit", I would guess that a preventive control of a water quality report from the Municipal source would not "scientifically" be accepted. The vast majority of those reports are generally a year behind or more.

 

Marshall

Mgourley,

 

you are probably right on the preventive control aspect. It would probably serve better as a justification for the rating of the raw water; if you have a plethora of past water quality reports that are all in excellent standing this would be added to the justification column.



#18 mgourley

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Posted 25 June 2018 - 09:30 PM

Yep. And since BRC requires those, they are on hand to be referenced if necessary. In addition to twice yearly lab testing of potable water.

 

Marshall


Edited by mgourley, 25 June 2018 - 09:31 PM.


#19 Anne5637

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Posted 18 October 2019 - 06:58 PM

Hi, Can someone help me please...what are the biological limits for RTE finished product for e coli, listeria and salmonella?



#20 GregWoods

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Posted 19 October 2019 - 05:42 AM

The regulation requires that certain activities be performed by a Preventive Controls Qualified Individual (PCQI) who has successfully completed training with best skinny tea.



#21 fepuhe

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Posted 19 October 2019 - 09:40 AM

Hope you find this useful. You may find your local food/ medicine national bodies in your country, find the regulations regard to these raw material.

This one is ours (Indonesia), you may also find in China has a very complete GB standards regard to each raw material/ chemicals.

 

Flour : Physical - impurities

 

Soybean OIl - none

 

Vegetable Shortening

Biology
ALT maks 100 (CFU/g)
Enterobacteriaceae maks 10 (CFU/g)
Chemicals

Arsen (As)/(mg/kg) ≤ 0.1;        
 Lead (Pb) mg/kg ≤ 0.1.
 Merkuri (Hg) mg/kg ≤ 0.05
 Cadmium (Cd) mg/kg ≤ 0.1.
 

Impurities

 

GRAN SUGAR

 

Biologi                                                                                                                                      
Total plate count (35°C, 48 h),
colony/10g ≤ 200;  
Coliform, MPN/g < 3;
Yeast and mold, colony/10 g ≤ 10.

Kimia
Allergen: Belerang dioksida (SO2) maks 2 ppm.
Logam berat: Cadmium (Cd), mg/kg ≤ 0.2;
Lead (Pb), mg/kg ≤ 0.25;
Stantum (Sn), mg/kg ≤ 40.0;
Mercury (Hg), mg/kg ≤ 0.03;
Total arsenic (As), mg/kg ≤ 1.0.

Fisik :
Tidak ada benda asing.

 

SALT

Chemicals:

Kimia
Kadmium (Cd) (mg/kg) Maks.0.5;
Timbal (Pb) (mg/kg) Maks. 10;
Raksa (Hg) (mg/kg) Maks. 0.1;
Arsen (As) (mg/kg) Maks. 0.1.

 

Stones, physical contamination

 

WATER (Municipal water)- possible hazards- BIOLOGICAL- prevantative control is- Yearly testing



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#22 Charles.C

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Posted 19 October 2019 - 09:17 PM

Tthis thread imho may contain some of the longest overkill lists on this forum ! :smile:

 

Do fsma really expect you to write out a BCPA encyclopedia ?

 

None the less thanks to all for the inputs.

 

Surely the basic haccp/harpc requirement for most of the food ingredients would be "food grade". ?  Including water.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C





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