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Nitrile Gloves vs Plastic Gloves


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#1 Parkey_Park

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Posted 10 October 2018 - 05:18 PM

Hey Everyone! 

 

I had a quick question in regards to which type of gloves are best for a processing facility. 

 

We currently use blue nitrile gloves as they are form fitting, resistant to tearing and the color allows us to identify any contamination should it happen. Our operations manager wants to switch to a marginally cheaper plastic glove; the kind you see at cafeterias that are loose, clear and noisy. 

 

I couldn't find anything specific in edition 8 about what kind of gloves to use but I'm worried about tearing and losing a clear glove in the food. 

 

 

What have you seen in other facilities? I thinking I'll do a risk analysis for the situation and suggest that the savings ($0.01/glove) aren't worth the risk. 

 

 

Thanks in advance. 



#2 Tomato Country Girl

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Posted 10 October 2018 - 05:54 PM

First we are a SQF Food Safety and Quality Certified facility, t I would look at the guidance for 11.2.9 below those are the guidelines---do a risk assessment, are the gloves made for food processing, look at durability, also I would do a RLE or rapid learning event- take the blue nitrile and test them right next to the "cheapies", see how long one lasts vs the other.  Also can you get a letter of conformance on those gloves for the purpose you are using them?  Also show when they tear what happens how do you identify the clear glove?  Will it be large enough to cause a choking hazard? Will the loose fit cause an issue?  Hope this helps.

 

Where protective clothing (e.g., gloves, face shields, etc.) is provided and used, it must be made of a material

that is food-safe and is easily cleaned. There must be a cleaning regime in place for protective clothing.

Price should not be the only factor when purchasing equipment, utensils and protective clothing. Site’s need to

consider the role of the new item and choose the right item to do the job.

Written specifications are to be developed that includes the detailed description or features of the item. The

goal of the specification is to outline all the technical details and requirements that the site has in mind for the

purchased item.

Some things that may be considered for the specification document may include, but is not exclusive to the

following:

• What is needed for the equipment and how the equipment will be used;

• Specific features, capabilities, or construction materials that are needed for that equipment;

• Durability of the item;

• Regulatory requirements;

• Manufactured and designed for use in a food site;

• Any required certifications or approvals (i.e., NSF, UL);

Ease and use of cleaning;

 

 



#3 MsMars

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Posted 10 October 2018 - 06:52 PM

I agree with you - savings aren't worth the risk IMO. We have always used brightly colored (usually blue) nitrile gloves in every facility that I've been in.  The risk of a clear thin glove is just too great - most facilities avoid using clear plastic for anything (other than maybe final packaging) at all costs.



#4 PollyKBD

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Posted 10 October 2018 - 07:47 PM

We currently use the cheaper plastic variety as we didn't know there were better options (very small facility new to SQF). The moment we laid eyes on those purple gloves we (both management and the food safety team) were all in love instantly for many different reasons. We haven't switched over yet (not 100% sure why) but it is in the works. The staff liked them, too (definitely a plus!)

We had no problem with our SQF audit using the gloves we use, but we are convinced that we will be making the switch soon. 



#5 Gerard H.

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 07:37 AM

Dear Parkey,

 

There are a few topics to consider in such a change:

  • The portability of the gloves, when you wear them during 8 hours / day & 5 days / week
  • The color, as mentioned above. The risk of damage of the glove during use in the food industry is very likely. So when there has been decided to use gloves, it's better that their colour is remarkable
  • Plastic - The gloves have product contact, so they need to be food grade, analog to your transportation belts and other food contact materials

Kind regards,

 

Gerard Heerkens



#6 Scampi

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 01:30 PM

It's a big ole NO on clear, white or flesh toned anything (gloves, aprons etc) you just cannot see the broken bits

 

The clear plastic ones are considered SINGLE USE.........put on, do that one job, take them off and dispose of. repeat

If there are worn and replaced as designed, they will work out to be more $$$ than nitrile that can be worn much longer without damage.

 

I wouldn't bother with a risk analysis on this, these gloves are not meant for MANUFACTURING.........they are made for food service

 

Right tool for the job at hand

 

Unless of course your boss thinks it's cheaper to rework a bunch of product every time a piece of glove goes missing.....


Because we always have is never an appropriate response!


#7 mgourley

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 10:23 PM

Vinyl is an alternative. Halfway between nitrile and plastic in both durability and cost.

I can get boxes of vinyl gloves in various colors from roughly $23 to $27 a box.

 

As stated above, it all depends on what you are using them for. That being said, I'd never use the cheapo plastic things.

 

Marshall



#8 MQA

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Posted 14 October 2018 - 11:34 AM

SQF or no SQF.  It’s more to do with common sense than GFSI.  

 

What colour are your raw materials or food?  If the clear glove was torn (and this does happen), and fell into food (and this does happen) – will you be able to potentially see it more if the glove was clear or blue? 

 

Put your foot down.  You are a food manufacturing facility.  The glove must be a colour that is not close or the same to the colour of your raw materials/finished product/etc.   

 

 

If you’re looking for cheaper – fine.  Look for different options, but not clear (though nitrile is the best!)

 

If you want to consider cost cutting – audit the way operations are using the gloves.  Sometimes gloves are overused and overdisposed of. 

 

 



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#9 forsakenque

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Posted 19 November 2018 - 06:04 AM

Latex is more stretchy and Nitrile will break or become brittle faster. However, I have no choice. My hands painfully break out iin hives and blisters when I wear latex gloves, and takes at least several days to recover. Nitrile all the way for us allergenic folk...



#10 Scampi

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Posted 20 November 2018 - 04:23 PM

Latex is a big no no in food manufacturing as the allergen could theoretically be based on to the finished product!


Because we always have is never an appropriate response!





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