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#1 QA_123

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Posted 18 January 2019 - 08:15 PM

Is there some good documentation that I can show someone who does not agree that a mop that has been used in a bathroom should only be used in a bathroom?  To me this is common sense but apparently it is not to everyone.

 

Thank you



#2 Scampi

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Posted 18 January 2019 - 08:25 PM

"Routine surface cleaning is recommended to control the spread of pathogens in hospital environments. In Norway, ordinary cleaning of patient rooms is traditionally performed with soap and water. In this study, four floor-mopping methods e dry, spray, moist and wet mopping e were compared by two systems using adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence (Hygiena and Biotrace). These systems assess residual organic soil on surfaces. The floor-mopping methods were also assessed by microbiological samples from the floor and air, before and after cleaning. All methods reduced organic material on the floors but wet and moist mopping seemed to be the most effective (P < 0.001, P < 0.011, respectively, ATP Hygiena). The two ATP methods were easy to use, although each had their own reading scales. Cleaning reduced organic material to 5-36% of the level present before cleaning, depending upon mopping method. All four mopping methods reduced bacteria on the floor from about 60-100 to 30-60 colony-forming units (cfu)/20 cm2 floor. Wet, moist and dry mopping seemed to be more effective in reducing bacteria on the floor, than the spray mopping (P ¼ 0.007, P ¼ 0.002 and P ¼ 0.011, respectively). The burden of bacteria in air increased for all methods just after mopping. The overall best cleaning methods seemed to be moist and wet mopping. ª 2008 The Hospital Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved"

One can then assume that the micobial load is now in the washwater and hence, that bucket and mop should not be used elsewhere

 

https://www.cmmonlin...s-easy-as-1-2-3

https://www.ciriscie...ublic-Restrooms

https://info.debgrou...ublic-washrooms

 

Plus the general GROSS this should be a no brainer

 

Ask that someone if they would also like to do their dishes in the toilets


Please stop referring to me as Sir/sirs


#3 vingal

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Posted 18 January 2019 - 08:49 PM

Well.... you can use color code cleaning utensils, create a SOP for color code utensils,  first assign color by area: RAW, RTE, Office, Restrooms, then make a poster explaining the color code for cleaning utensils, post it in visible areas and perform training sessions with its corresponding training records. 



#4 SQFconsultant

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Posted 18 January 2019 - 09:39 PM

Pink Slip.


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