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Is oat an allergen?


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asith

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Posted 11 March 2019 - 03:12 AM

Hi all, 

 

Can any one assist me whether Oat is considered as allergen?



012117

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Posted 11 March 2019 - 04:43 AM

Depending on the regulations I think.

 

If you use the EU, yes.

https://eur-lex.euro...0180101&from=EN

 

If using US:  Different approach.

https://www.fda.gov/...s/ucm362880.htm



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Tony-C

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Posted 11 March 2019 - 06:05 AM

Hi asith,

 

To add to useful links in the previous posts see here: https://ceres.co.nz/...free-heres-why/

 

Kind regards,

 

Tony



Parkz58

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 09:45 PM

Hi asith,

 

To add to useful links in the previous posts see here: https://ceres.co.nz/...free-heres-why/

 

Kind regards,

 

Tony

 

Thanks for posting that link, Tony...but I have issue with that article, as it oversimplifies the gluten issue, and claims that avenin is a gluten protein.  It technically is NOT a gluten protein, but is a very close "cousin", and therefore in some people with gluten sensitivity, it can cause reactions...but not all people with gluten sensitivity have issues with oats/avenin, so it is a gross oversimplification to state that oats are not gluten free...because technically, they ARE gluten free.  I realize that I may be splitting hairs, but we produce oat products...and it's a disservice to scare away people who would otherwise be able to enjoy our products.

 

Brian



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Charles.C

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Posted 14 March 2019 - 11:26 AM

Thanks for posting that link, Tony...but I have issue with that article, as it oversimplifies the gluten issue, and claims that avenin is a gluten protein.  It technically is NOT a gluten protein, but is a very close "cousin", and therefore in some people with gluten sensitivity, it can cause reactions...but not all people with gluten sensitivity have issues with oats/avenin, so it is a gross oversimplification to state that oats are not gluten free...because technically, they ARE gluten free.  I realize that I may be splitting hairs, but we produce oat products...and it's a disservice to scare away people who would otherwise be able to enjoy our products.

 

Brian

 

Hi Brian,

 

The statement that "oats are gluten free" is complicated by the definition/interpretation of "gluten" and its measurement with respect to international labelling standards.

 

Based on the Australian/NZ interpretation, oats will never be "gluten-free", eg

 

Attached File  Oats and the gluten free diet,2015.pdf   53.55KB   13 downloads

 

In the context of Coeliac Disease, I also noticed this -
.

 

Celiac disease is caused by an immune response in genetically predisposed individuals to specific storage proteins, commonly referred to as "glutens," that occur naturally in cereal grains (Shan et al., 2002). Technically, "gluten" is a term applied specifically to the combination of the prolamin proteins called "gliadins" and the glutelin proteins called "glutenins" found in wheat (Brown, 2004). However, the term "gluten" has been used generically to refer to prolamin and glutelin protein mixtures found in other cereal grains (Kasarda, 2005, personal communication). Although all cereal grains contain prolamin and glutelin proteins, these proteins are not identical in different grains. These proteins differ in their amino acid sequences in different grains, and not all have been shown to evoke an abnormal immune response that affects the intestinal lining of persons genetically susceptible to celiac disease (Kasarda, 2003). The term "gluten" will be used in this report in the more general sense of the combination of both prolamin and glutelin proteins found in cereal grains.

 

There is no consensus as to whether oats present a hazard for all individuals with celiac disease. Several studies, including one that lasted 5 years, have reported that most celiac study participants tolerated moderate amounts (e.g., 50-70 grams daily) of oats (Janatuinen et al., 1995; Janatuinen et al., 2000; Janatuinen et al., 2002; Lundin et al., 2003; Arentz-Hansen et al., 2004). The oats used by Lundin et al. (2003) and Arentz-Hansen et al. (2004) were tested to ensure that they did not contain any gluten proteins from wheat, rye, or barley.

 

Currently, commercial immunology-based ELISA test kits for the detection of gluten in foods are manufactured by Immunotech (Czech Republic), Ingenasa (Spain), Morinaga (Japan), Diffchamb (Sweden), Neogen Corporation (U.S.), R-Biopharm (Germany), and Tepnel BioSystems (U.K.). All of these detect prolamins, the proteins found in soluble aqueous-alcohol extracts from cereals. None is designed to detect all proteins associated with celiac disease.

These ELISA test kits cross-react, to differing degrees, with prolamins derived from wheat, rye, and barley. None of the test kits cross-reacts with protein extracts from oats (Gabrovsk´ et al., 2004; Nonaka, 2004; Abouzied, 2004; Brewer et al., 2004). As such, the ELISA test kits do not provide protection to individuals with celiac disease who are sensitive to oats (Peraaho et al., 2004; Storsrud et al., 2003; Arentz-Hansen et al., 2004; Lundin et al., 2003)

 

Attached File  FDA - Allergen thresholds, Celiac disease.pdf   437.53KB   7 downloads

(no refs after 2006 although latest "update" stated 2018)

 

and (includes a few later refs) -

Gluten is a composite of proteins contained in cereal grains.

Gluten from wheat, barley, and rye is distinct from gluten from other sources, possessing a unique, repetitive amino acid motif capable of provoking celiac disease (CD) in genetically susceptible individuals.(1-4)

The role of gluten derived from oats in the pathogenesis of CD remains unresolved. The majority of clinical studies suggest that oats can be tolerated by CD patients without imparting disease.(5-11) Accordingly, sporadic cases of oat reactivity in CD patients have largely been attributed to cross-contact caused by agronomic practices or manufacturing methods.(12-15) However, a handful of clinical studies have demonstrated that consumption of oats in long-term, daily-challenge studies can lead to intestinal inflammation in a subset of celiac subjects.(16, 17),

........................

Although not definitive, these findings implicate avenins in the pathogenesis of CD.

 

Attached File  Assessment of Avenins in Oat Varieties,2017.pdf   312.46KB   10 downloads

 

A more optimistic (I think) assessment here -

 

Attached File  Why Oats are safe and healthy for Celiac Disease patients,2016.pdf   914.97KB   10 downloads


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C





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