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#1 Amy Thest

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Posted 11 March 2019 - 07:45 AM

Hi Everyone! 

 

I am now on the process of writing our Food Safety and Quality Manual for our company. 

 

I doubt if I should or should not used the word "SHALL" in the document? 

 

 

Hoping for a response. 

 

Thanks, 

Amy 



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#2 Andy_Yellows

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Posted 11 March 2019 - 08:44 AM

I'd say 'shall' is a pretty reasonable word to use in your procedures in the right context. I tend to use 'must' and 'should' for instructional sentences but I'm sure 'shall' would also be fine


Farke's on a horse


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#3 SQFconsultant

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Posted 11 March 2019 - 11:43 AM

Shall is an action word as opposed to wishy washy words like should or may, might etc.

Shall is then a must - must and shall could be interchangeable.

Shall is an excellent word to use as it is an intent.


Kind regards,
Glenn Oster
 
GOC Group | +1.800.793.7042 | Serving the Food, Food Packaging & Food Storage Industry
SQF Development, Implementation & Certification Consultants
Serving the beautiful United States of America - all of it!

http://www.GlennOsterConsulting.com  

 

 


#4 Amy Thest

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Posted 12 March 2019 - 01:43 AM

Good Day! 

 

Your response helps a lot on my doubts. 

Thank you.

 

Then I will be using "SHALL" with this document. 

I am using the ISO 22000-2018 as my reference in doing this and ISO/TS 22000-1 for the PRP's. 

I hope  this is just fine. I did copy some words from it. 

 

As per Sir Charles say, I just have to make an overview of what we do for food safety and that makes up our Food Safety Manual

 

Hehe :) 

 

 

Best Regards, 

Amy



#5 Amy Thest

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Posted 12 March 2019 - 01:48 AM

I wish there's someone out there who can check my output for this and do corrections for free. 

 

Hehe :) ... I would be very glad. 

 

 

 

Regards, 

Amy



#6 Charles.C

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Posted 12 March 2019 - 08:44 AM

I wish there's someone out there who can check my output for this and do corrections for free. 

 

Hehe :) ... I would be very glad. 

 

 

 

Regards, 

Amy

 

Hi Amy,

 

You are always  welcome to upload yr "output" for comments.

 

I have one caveat for using "Shall" in Procedures, etc, Preferably avoided if you know that implementation will subsequently, visibly show claim will be unfulfilled.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#7 Amy Thest

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 07:28 AM

Hi Sir Charles! 

 

Thank you. But I doubt if its okay to upload my output in here. 

Or maybe I can send it to a personal account? 

 

 

With regards to using "SHALL" in our Food Safety and Quality Manual, are you saying I should avoid using this word in this document? 

 

 

Regards, 

Amy



#8 Cathy

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 12:22 PM

Word choice is completely up to you.  I highly recommend using words that work well in your own culture.   Would you normally speak that way? If not, avoid it.  In my opinion, too many people write "to the code" opr just repeat the code and this does not add value to  your organization. 


Edited by Cathy, 13 March 2019 - 12:22 PM.

Cathy Crawford, HACCP Consulting Group
http://haccpcg.com/

#9 Scampi

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 12:32 PM

As Glenn pointed out SHALL = MUST 

therefore if you use the word SHALL and you KNOW it's not always going to get done as written then you should use another word, or better yet evaluate why you think it won't always get done

 

I like to think of my written programs like a legal document (which depending on where you are, they may very well be) and am very careful about word choice; you may or may not want to leave wiggle room for interpretation..... all CCP documents (program, monitoring, deviations etc.) for example should NOT leave any room for interpretation  


Because we always have is never an appropriate response!


#10 jcieslowski

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 12:36 PM

I'm not really adding much new to the discussion, but I prefer the word 'Will' to 'shall'.  I write my sops and procedures very 'plain language'. 

For example: "Shipping Filter Baskets will be checked for damages or findings after each load by the shipper.  The findings will be recorded on the Filter Basket Inspection Form.  If any holes or damages are found, the truck will be unloaded, the filter replaced, and the sugar re-run through the new filter."

The language is 'plain' and easy to understand, but it is not ambiguous.  I hate 'should' in a procedure.  If you 'should' do something it means it's up to the person doing it if they want to or not.  And if it's an optional step it doesn't really belong in a procedure.  

For example:  "Shipping Filter Baskets should be checked for damages or findings after each load.  The findings should be recorded on the Filter Basket Inspection Form.  If any holes or damages are found, the shipper should unload the truck, replace the filter, and re-run the sugar through the new filter."

 

Should, in this case means that the shipper may decide not to check the filter basket.  It also means he might not rerun the truck if he finds damages to the filter.  If I put my auditor hat on, the top example gives me some confidence that if the basket is damaged, the product will be rerun.  The second example gives me no confidence at all.  

 

I guess my point being: don't confuse style with substance.  I've not had any problems with my 'less formal' style because my substance is still specific.






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