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#1 HanineTabaja

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Posted 03 April 2019 - 06:47 AM

Hello,

 

For the production of some traditional sweet, we must use a wooden mold.

we are aiming to be iso 2200 certified.

 

the use of wood in this case should be a ccp? oprp? how can I monitor its hygiene to ensure it is safe?



#2 Charles.C

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Posted 03 April 2019 - 09:08 AM

Hello,

 

For the production of some traditional sweet, we must use a wooden mold.

we are aiming to be iso 2200 certified.

 

the use of wood in this case should be a ccp? oprp? how can I monitor its hygiene to ensure it is safe?

 

It may depend on the specific situation, type of wood and its microbiological characteristics.

 

Wood is typically a hygienic No-No with respect to food contact surfaces but, for example, wooden blocks as used in fish processing have a composition which is validatably contamination-resistant/ competitive to plastic versions.so have retained acceptability.

 

Hygiene related aspects are typically controlled/maintained via GMP Prerequisite programs.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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#3 EagleEye

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Posted 03 April 2019 - 10:18 AM

Hello Hanine Tabaja,

 

How much you fear the chances of wood chips to get added to your product during the process? Are you using any X-ray detector or anything in the line later to find out physical hazards?

 

You must have to assess the characteristics of the the wood you are using, I would say..



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#4 HanineTabaja

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Posted 03 April 2019 - 10:20 AM

It may depend on the specific situation, type of wood and its microbiological characteristics.

 

Wood is typically a hygienic No-No with respect to food contact surfaces but, for example, wooden blocks as used in fish processing have a composition which is validatably contamination-resistant/ competitive to plastic versions.so have retained acceptability.

 

Hygiene related aspects are typically controlled/maintained via GMP Prerequisite programs.

Thank you very much

 

Is there any recommended type of wood for the food section?

I know that it is preferable to use the pine, oak ,beech and ash? is that correct?

 

The cleaning of these molds could be done by water? or does this increase the risk of bacterial growth?



#5 HanineTabaja

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Posted 03 April 2019 - 10:32 AM

Hello Hanine Tabaja,

 

How much you fear the chances of wood chips to get added to your product during the process? Are you using any X-ray detector or anything in the line later to find out physical hazards?

 

You must have to assess the characteristics of the the wood you are using, I would say..

Thank you very much

 

No we don't have any x-ray detector, but our most concern is the "microbiological contamination' rather than the "wood chips"

is there are specific characteristics of the wood preferred to be used ?



#6 SQFconsultant

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Posted 03 April 2019 - 10:52 AM

Why must it be wood?


Kind regards,

 

Glenn Oster
 
 
GOC GROUP / +1.800.793.7042 / Food - Food Packaging - Food Storage/DC

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#7 zanorias

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Posted 03 April 2019 - 11:14 AM

This review paper is an interesting read on the microbiological relation of wood as a food contact tool:

https://onlinelibrar...1541-4337.12199

 

 

Table 1, p.495, indicates poplar, beech and pine to be commonly used. The most suitable for your operation will likely depend on your product and process. 



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#8 Charles.C

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Posted 04 April 2019 - 03:04 AM

Thank you very much

 

Is there any recommended type of wood for the food section?

I know that it is preferable to use the pine, oak ,beech and ash? is that correct?

 

The cleaning of these molds could be done by water? or does this increase the risk of bacterial growth?

 

Hi Hanine,

 

The chopping blocks used in seafood were recommended to be made from maple although numerous varieties were (and probably still are) in use.

 

My experience was originally with wood but factory switched to plastic due auditors were invariably unhappy with any wood surfaces/food contact.

 

Auditors' "cons" for wood cf plastic were hygiene related, eg porosity prevented cleaning/sanitisation, often used in poor physical condition, eg fragmenting, risk of non- separation for raw/rte items, eg -

 

http://www.foodsafet...boards.html?m=1

 

It is possible to find both supporting and non-supporting micro. data on such aspects, eg -

 

Attached File  Micro status food_prep_surfaces__2006_.pdf   283.67KB   14 downloads

 

The later, excellent review in Post 7 covers many of these issues in considerable detail.

 

Re-Post6, Is the mold required to work at high temperature ?.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#9 Scampi

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Posted 04 April 2019 - 01:44 PM

https://www.fda.gov/...e/ucm374510.pdf

 

4-101.17 Wood, Use Limitation.

(A) Except as specified in ¶¶ (B), (C), and (D) of this section, wood and wood wicker may not be used as a FOOD-CONTACT SURFACE.

 

(B) Hard maple or an equivalently hard, close-grained wood may be used for: (1) Cutting boards; cutting blocks; bakers' tables; and UTENSILS such as rolling pins, doughnut dowels, salad bowls, and chopsticks; and (2) Wooden paddles used in confectionery operations for pressure scraping kettles when manually preparing confections at a temperature of 110o C (230o F) or above. 111 Single-Service and Single-Use

 

(C) Whole, uncut, raw fruits and vegetables, and nuts in the shell may be kept in the wood shipping containers in which they were received, until the fruits, vegetables, or nuts are used.

 

(D) If the nature of the FOOD requires removal of rinds, peels, husks, or shells before consumption, the whole, uncut, raw FOOD may be kept in: (1) Untreated wood containers; or (2) Treated wood containers if the containers are treated with a preservative that meets the requirements specified in 21 CFR 178.3800 Preservatives for wood.


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