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What action to take if employee is diagnosed with Tuberculosis?


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#1 fuse_23

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Posted 30 May 2019 - 07:02 AM

Hi,

 

What if we have found out one the staff has Tuberculosis, what we must need to do? Any prevention that needs to take?



#2 GMO

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Posted 30 May 2019 - 07:41 AM

I'm not sure it's a food safety risk but it's certainly a transmission risk between them and other staff. 



#3 zanorias

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Posted 30 May 2019 - 08:15 AM

From the UK FSA Fitness to Work:

If food handlers are unable to work without coughing or

sneezing on open food, then they should work elsewhere until they can. A history of

tuberculosis is not a reason to exclude a food handler for food safety reasons. However, the

disease may affect an individual’s general health in such a way as to make them unfit for

work or they may pose a risk of infection to others in the workplace. Health professionals

can provide further advice if it is needed.

https://www.hsl.gov....ireland1009.pdf

 

In food establishments it is spread among food handlers when a TB infected food worker

 

coughs or sneezes, releasing the TB bacteria into the air. Nearby food workers breathe in

these bacteria and become infected. TB cannot be spread by food in a food establishment.

The TB bacteria dies, when it comes in contact with food.

http://www.dynastysc...-prevention.pdf

 

In consultation with the Ministry of Health (MOH), the Singapore Food Agency (SFA), no longer requires food handlers to undergo mandatory typhoid vaccination and tuberculosis screening with effect from 27th September 2010.

 

https://www.sfa.gov....r-food-handlers

 

3. Food handlers may also be an important group to screen for tuberculosis. Such screening is not done to protect customers of food establishments since M. tuberculosis is not transmitted through contaminated food and is unlikely to be spread in food establishments. However, many food handlers are from medically underserved low-income populations and/or foreign-born persons from countries with a high prevalence of tuberculosis. 

 

http://www.mondaq.co...n The Workplace

 

2. CHEST AND OTHER RESPIRATORY DISEASES

 

There is no evidence that these can cause food borne infection.

Coughing and sneezing over food is not hygienically acceptable and employees may

need to be excluded from food handling for this reason. If allowed to stay at work,

emphasise the need for thorough hand washing.

Tuberculosis is not spread through food handling. However, the disease may affect an

individual’s general health so as to make them unfit for work or they may pose a risk of

infection to others in the workplace.

https://www.tendring...tnesstoWork.pdf

 

 

The literature and guidance seems to suggest it is more an employee health concern than a food product-consumer safety risk. I would recommend the employee stays off work to prevent spread through the workforce, and sees a health care professional.

The CDC says:

After you take the medicines for about 2 or 3 weeks, you may no longer be able to spread TB bacteria to others. If your doctor or nurse agrees, you will be able to go back to your daily routine, including returning to work or school.

 

https://www.cdc.gov/...a_tbdisease.htm

 



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#4 fuse_23

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Posted 31 May 2019 - 10:26 AM

From the UK FSA Fitness to Work:

If food handlers are unable to work without coughing or

sneezing on open food, then they should work elsewhere until they can. A history of

tuberculosis is not a reason to exclude a food handler for food safety reasons. However, the

disease may affect an individual’s general health in such a way as to make them unfit for

work or they may pose a risk of infection to others in the workplace. Health professionals

can provide further advice if it is needed.

https://www.hsl.gov....ireland1009.pdf

 

In food establishments it is spread among food handlers when a TB infected food worker

 

coughs or sneezes, releasing the TB bacteria into the air. Nearby food workers breathe in

these bacteria and become infected. TB cannot be spread by food in a food establishment.

The TB bacteria dies, when it comes in contact with food.

http://www.dynastysc...-prevention.pdf

 

In consultation with the Ministry of Health (MOH), the Singapore Food Agency (SFA), no longer requires food handlers to undergo mandatory typhoid vaccination and tuberculosis screening with effect from 27th September 2010.

 

https://www.sfa.gov....r-food-handlers

 

3. Food handlers may also be an important group to screen for tuberculosis. Such screening is not done to protect customers of food establishments since M. tuberculosis is not transmitted through contaminated food and is unlikely to be spread in food establishments. However, many food handlers are from medically underserved low-income populations and/or foreign-born persons from countries with a high prevalence of tuberculosis. 

 

http://www.mondaq.co...n The Workplace

 

2. CHEST AND OTHER RESPIRATORY DISEASES

 

There is no evidence that these can cause food borne infection.

Coughing and sneezing over food is not hygienically acceptable and employees may

need to be excluded from food handling for this reason. If allowed to stay at work,

emphasise the need for thorough hand washing.

Tuberculosis is not spread through food handling. However, the disease may affect an

individual’s general health so as to make them unfit for work or they may pose a risk of

infection to others in the workplace.

https://www.tendring...tnesstoWork.pdf

 

 

The literature and guidance seems to suggest it is more an employee health concern than a food product-consumer safety risk. I would recommend the employee stays off work to prevent spread through the workforce, and sees a health care professional.

The CDC says:

After you take the medicines for about 2 or 3 weeks, you may no longer be able to spread TB bacteria to others. If your doctor or nurse agrees, you will be able to go back to your daily routine, including returning to work or school.

 

https://www.cdc.gov/...a_tbdisease.htm

 

Thank you very much for these inputs.



#5 Setanta

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Posted 31 May 2019 - 11:54 AM

I would also ask for advice from the patient's doctor for final confirmation.


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