Jump to content

  • Quick Navigation
Photo

Why isn't Gluten itself labelled/ declared?


  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 Alfiebru

Alfiebru

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 12 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom

Posted 19 June 2019 - 09:17 AM

Hi

 

In our gluten containing product labels we declare the allergen in the ingredient list by capitalising WHEAT and listing Wheat again in the allergen list. My question is why isn't Gluten itself labelled/ declared?

 

Thanks



#2 Dr.Khan

Dr.Khan

    DR

  • IFSQN Senior
  • 314 posts
  • 124 thanks
23
Excellent

  • Australia
    Australia
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sydney
  • Interests:Food, Reading technical information,provding technical help in QA,R&D,staff Training, products and processes optimisation, watching documentaries and making presentations
    AM available as consultant in Quality Assurance, Product & process development/ optimisation, staff training and trouble shooting in complex manufacturing Environment

    Cal me on +61411588329 to discuss your requirements.

    Am available for International Assignments

Posted 19 June 2019 - 09:34 AM

Hi Alfiebru

 

The Gluten is not declared itself because it is not listed in the product specification as an added ingredient but came from an ingredient (wheat which is listed and is an added ingredient). 

pure gluten is available as a product in the market and when it is part of the ingredient list in the product specification then it should also be listed in the ingredient list of the product label

 

Kind regards

Dr. Humaid Khan

Managing Director

Halal International Services

Australia

+61411588329



#3 zanorias

zanorias

    Grade - PIFSQN

  • IFSQN Principal
  • 757 posts
  • 218 thanks
140
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:UK
  • Interests:Motorcycling, Food Safety, Science, Water Sports, Nature

Posted 19 June 2019 - 09:44 AM

Hi Alfiebru,

 

The EU requirement is for the allergenic ingredient to be emphasised, which in this case is wheat, as per 1169/2011 below:

 

 

29. Cereals containing gluten will be declared in the ingredients list using the specific name of the cereal, i.e. wheat (such as spelt or Khorasan), rye, barley or oats. Where ‘spelt’, ‘Khorasan’and ‘Kamut’have been used;the inclusion of a specific reference to wheat would be required; for example ‘spelt(wheat)’or ‘Khorasanwheat’and ‘Kamut (wheat)’.

30. The voluntary inclusion of glutenwithin the ingredientslist following the mandatory declaration of a cereal containing gluten is possible. However, the regulation requires that it is the cereal that should be emphasised, rather than the gluten; for example ‘barley(gluten)’.

https://acss.food.go...al-guidance.pdf



#4 pHruit

pHruit

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 1,397 posts
  • 593 thanks
300
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Composing/listening to classical music, electronics, mountain biking, science, sarcasm

Posted 19 June 2019 - 10:16 AM

In a general sense it is possible to have an allergy to proteins other than gluten that are found in cereals, hence the cereal itself requiring declaration.



#5 SQFconsultant

SQFconsultant

    SQFconsultant

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 3,099 posts
  • 789 thanks
655
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Truth is like a delicious slice of watermelon... you just want more and more!

Posted 19 June 2019 - 01:02 PM

Because Gluten comes from an ingredient and is not an ingredient itself.


Kind regards,

 

Glenn Oster
 
GOC GROUP / +1.772.646.4115 / Food - Food Packaging - Food Storage/DC

SQF, BRC & IFS System Development, Implementation & Certification Consultants

Serving Small-to-Mid-Size Businesses | Now accepting: BTC, XRP, ETH, DAI, USDCoin & LTC

Internal Auditor Training | eConsultant | FSVP | United States - Panama - Costa Rica

http://www.GlennOsterConsulting.com  -- 

 

 

The United States Digital Dollar (USD-Coin) is NOW Accepted by GOC for all services

... and at a reduction at or about 50% until November 4, 2020

These are exciting times - and this is EXCITING!

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

#6 The Food Scientist

The Food Scientist

    Grade - PIFSQN

  • IFSQN Principal
  • 927 posts
  • 241 thanks
180
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Female
  • Interests:Food Science, Nature, SQF, Learning, Trying out new foods, Sarcasm.

Posted 19 June 2019 - 01:04 PM

Because Wheat is the major food allergen according to FDA, not gluten. Some companies put gluten between brackets next to wheat. You don't see them indicating the protein allergen of shrimp for example. You just list the ingredient itself. 


Edited by The Food Scientist, 19 June 2019 - 01:07 PM.

Everything in food is science. The only subjective part is when you eat it. - Alton Brown.


#7 pHruit

pHruit

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 1,397 posts
  • 593 thanks
300
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Composing/listening to classical music, electronics, mountain biking, science, sarcasm

Posted 19 June 2019 - 01:27 PM

Because Wheat is the major food allergen according to FDA, not gluten. Some companies put gluten between brackets next to wheat. You don't see them indicating the protein allergen of shrimp for example. You just list the ingredient itself. 

 

The OP appears to be in the UK, although the labelling requirement in this area is similar - Annex II of Regulation (EU) 1169/2011 defines the cereal as the allergen rather than the specific protein.

It is optionally permissible to include a reference to gluten within the ingredients list for the EU/UK market, so long as the correct emphasis is placed on the actual ingredient as used - e.g. Wheat (gluten).

However, the Food & Drink Federation (FDF - UK industry trade body) in conjunction with Coeliac UK, The Anaphylaxis Campaign, and BRC, has published best practice guidance on labelling of gluten that recommends against this approach.

Full details in this document: https://www.fdf.org....lling doc_7.pdf



#8 Hank Major

Hank Major

    Grade - SIFSQN

  • IFSQN Senior
  • 317 posts
  • 98 thanks
32
Excellent

  • United States
    United States

Posted 20 June 2019 - 08:53 PM

Also, there's not really such as thing as gluten. The proteins are glutenin (from wheat), hordein (from barley), secalin (from rye); and avenin (from oats).



#9 GMO

GMO

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 2,696 posts
  • 686 thanks
176
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom

Posted 21 June 2019 - 11:49 AM

I suspect when the consultations were going on around what to change and the decision to put the allergens into the ingredients box came about, that probably made the decision for them.  It would be rare for gluten to be specifically added as an ingredient whereas I'm sure they were keen for the allergen names to be as simple as possible for allergic consumers to understand. 

 

Also I believe some of the potential allergic / sensitivity response is meant to be associated with other proteins in the grain not just gluten?  Certainly I have a friend who has anaphylaxis to wheat who cannot eat all gluten free foods.  This can leave you in a bizarre situation where you could have ingredients on the label which are derived from wheat but the product could have a gluten free claim.  For my friend though, the ingredients listing is still really important.



#10 The Food Scientist

The Food Scientist

    Grade - PIFSQN

  • IFSQN Principal
  • 927 posts
  • 241 thanks
180
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Female
  • Interests:Food Science, Nature, SQF, Learning, Trying out new foods, Sarcasm.

Posted 21 June 2019 - 12:30 PM

Also, there's not really such as thing as gluten. The proteins are glutenin (from wheat), hordein (from barley), secalin (from rye); and avenin (from oats).

 

Gluten in wheat is a mixture of glutenin & gliadin. It's simply a mixture of proteins rather than one. 


Everything in food is science. The only subjective part is when you eat it. - Alton Brown.


#11 Hank Major

Hank Major

    Grade - SIFSQN

  • IFSQN Senior
  • 317 posts
  • 98 thanks
32
Excellent

  • United States
    United States

Posted 21 June 2019 - 08:38 PM

Gluten in wheat is a mixture of glutenin & gliadin. It's simply a mixture of proteins rather than one. 

 

 

Exactly. In fact, the glutenins and gliadins are classes of proteins, not named chemicals the way, say, citric acid is. So regulators and people who are allergic don't want to have to parse all that terminology and deal with companies trying to obfuscate their ingredient labels.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

EV SSL Certificate