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Sweetened Condensed Milk and making other processed dairy Shelf Stable


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#1 thedrumchef

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Posted 09 July 2019 - 02:17 PM

I am creating a coffee drink that uses sweetened condensed milk as an ingredient. 

Am i right in thinking that adding an acidity regulator like potassium carbonate and pasteurising the product to 70 C would make the product safe and shelf stable for a couple of months. 

 



#2 Charles.C

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Posted 10 July 2019 - 06:37 AM

I am creating a coffee drink that uses sweetened condensed milk as an ingredient. 

Am i right in thinking that adding an acidity regulator like potassium carbonate and pasteurising the product to 70 C would make the product safe and shelf stable for a couple of months. 

 

The Product/Process context is rather limited. :smile:

 

How are you proposing to justify the 2 months ?


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#3 NicholasChai

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Posted 10 July 2019 - 06:43 AM

I believe there's a lot of study to be done before determining whether pasteurizing or adding acidity regulator will help. U will need product information such as water activity, ph etc, also the kind of packaging material u r going to store the coffee drink in. But pasteurization for me is the way to go, the temperature and time must be base on target bacteria and log u want to reduce, and will such temp. affect your product quality such as colour etc. 



#4 thedrumchef

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Posted 10 July 2019 - 05:01 PM

Ideally the cold brew coffee would not be affected much with colour and taste from pasteurisation up to about 90C. Same goes for the Condensed Milk as the process to create it is near boiling point. We are based in Scotland so the natural potable water supply is very soft.
Microorganisms to eliminate would be

Bacillus cereus.
Listeria monocytogenes.
Yersinia enterocolitica.
Salmonella spp.
Escherichia coli O157:H7.
Campylobacter jejuni.



#5 thedrumchef

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Posted 10 July 2019 - 05:02 PM

The retail containers are made of glass



#6 Ryan M.

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Posted 10 July 2019 - 06:51 PM

**Edit: I just realized you are in Scotland.  Please refer to their regulations.  I only have expertise in Dairy regulatory in the US.  However, the pathogen concerns and outgrowth are the same.

 

Nope.

 

To be shelf stable it will have to be packed sterile no matter what temperature you "pasteurize".  Dairy products are heavily regulated, and for good reason, they are highly susceptible for pathogen growth and outgrowth.  Aseptic (sterile) dairy operations require minimum of 280oF for 2 seconds of pasteurization according to PMO and require sterility throughout process from pasteurization through packaging (sterile container in sterile environment).

 

Also, depending on the ingredient contents and level of milk protein in the finished product it could be identified as a Grade A dairy beverage and thus fall under the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance (PMO) requirements.  Current PMO revision 2017 is under enforcement.  See excerpt below from PMO, this is from Section 1 Definitions, GG Milk Products Definition.

 

"6. Products not included in Items 1-5 are Grade “A” milk products which have a minimum of 2.0% milk protein (Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen (TKN) X 6.38) and a minimum of sixty five percent (65%) by weight milk, milk product or a combination of milk products. 8 Safe and suitable (as defined in 21 CFR 130.3(d)) non-grade “A” dairy ingredients, can be utilized in the products defined in Items 1-6 when added to a level needed for a functional or technical effect, and limited by Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs) and are either: a. Prior sanctioned or otherwise approved by FDA, or b. GRAS (generally recognized as safe), or c. An approved food additive listed in the CFR"

 

https://www.fda.gov/...114169/download


Edited by Ryan M., 10 July 2019 - 06:52 PM.


#7 Charles.C

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Posted 10 July 2019 - 08:56 PM

Ideally the cold brew coffee would not be affected much with colour and taste from pasteurisation up to about 90C. Same goes for the Condensed Milk as the process to create it is near boiling point. We are based in Scotland so the natural potable water supply is very soft.
Microorganisms to eliminate would be

Bacillus cereus.
Listeria monocytogenes.
Yersinia enterocolitica.
Salmonella spp.
Escherichia coli O157:H7.
Campylobacter jejuni.

 

Sounds like yr coffee contains meat and poultry ??!!


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#8 thedrumchef

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Posted 10 July 2019 - 09:15 PM

As you can tell, totally new to this and appreciate all of the feedback! This is really helpful in our process. Will have to delve deeper into the requirements for dairy pasteurisation in the UK. Cheers Guys!






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