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Accelerated Shelf Life Template for Bakery Product


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#1 StevieP

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Posted 10 July 2019 - 08:29 AM

Good Morning Everyone,

I’m after some advice, I would like to conduct accelerated Shelf-Life testing of ambient long life bakery products e.g. cookies, muffins, flapjacks etc, that have on average a year’s life or over. I wanted to know if anyone has a template to under how I can accelerate  the shelf life for a customer of mine.

Welcome you thoughts.

Thanks,



#2 Charles.C

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Posted 10 July 2019 - 02:42 PM

Good Morning Everyone,

I’m after some advice, I would like to conduct accelerated Shelf-Life testing of ambient long life bakery products e.g. cookies, muffins, flapjacks etc, that have on average a year’s life or over. I wanted to know if anyone has a template to under how I can accelerate  the shelf life for a customer of mine.

Welcome you thoughts.

Thanks,

 

 

Hi StevieP,

 

There are a large number of threads on this topic here.

 

Implementations of ASLT range from not so difficult to highly complex. I doubt you will find a generic template.

 

From a practical POV, I suggest you have a look at this post/thread -

 

https://www.ifsqn.co...ng/#entry108521

(note the caveat in Post 14)

 

To illustrate the theory/details of implementations I have extracted these documents from other threads -

 

Attached File  sl1 - ASLT.pdf   538.86KB   51 downloads

Attached File  sl2 - ASLT.pdf   162.18KB   49 downloads

Attached File  sl3 - ASLT.pdf   904.25KB   50 downloads

 

There is at least one previous thread targetted on Bakeries -

 

https://www.ifsqn.co...ry-dairy-spice/

 

PS -  From another reference, I extracted this simplified "condensed" summary which maybe sort of (reverse) relates to yr OP -

 

The Q-Rule
 

The Q-Rule states that the degradation rate decreases by a constant factor when temperature is lowered by certain degrees.

The value of Q is typically set at 2, 3, or 4. This factor is proportional to the temperature change as Qn, where n equals the temperature change in °C divided by 10°C. Since 10°C is the baseline temperature, the Q-Rule is sometimes referred to as Q10.

 

To illustrate the application of the Q-Rule, let us assume that the stability of a product at 50°C is 32 days.

The recommended storage temperature is 25°C and n = (50 - 25)/10 = 2.5

Let us set an intermediate value of Q = 3. Thus, Qn = (3)2.5 = 15.6. The predicted shelf life is 32 days 3 15.6 = 500 days [maybe a typo, = 32 x 15.6] .

This approach is more conservative when lower values of Q are used.

Both Q-Rule and the bracket methods are rough approximations of stability. They can be effectively used to plan elevated temperature levels as well as the duration of testing in the accelerated stability testing protocol.

 


Edited by Charles.C, 10 July 2019 - 03:01 PM.
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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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